Côte d’Ivoire crisis

This item appears on page 18 of the February 2011 issue.
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At press time, the situation remained very tense in Côte d’Ivoire. Political violence over a contested presidential election held on Nov. 28, 2010, had resulted in over 170 deaths and the fleeing of about 14,000 refugees to Liberia.

The incumbent leader, Laurent Gbagbo, and his opponent, Alassane Ouattara, each claimed to be the elected president. The United Nations and the African Union as well as neighboring countries were urging Gbagbo to step down to prevent another civil war.

Based on the deteriorating political and security situation and growing anti-Western sentiment, on Dec. 20 the Department of State ordered the departure of all nonemergency personnel from the US Embassy.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

At press time, the situation remained very tense in Côte d’Ivoire. Political violence over a contested presidential election held on Nov. 28, 2010, had resulted in over 170 deaths and the fleeing of about 14,000 refugees to Liberia.

The incumbent leader, Laurent Gbagbo, and his opponent, Alassane Ouattara, each claimed to be the elected president. The United Nations and the African Union as well as neighboring countries were urging Gbagbo to step down to prevent another civil war.

Based on the deteriorating political and security situation and growing anti-Western sentiment, on Dec. 20 the Department of State ordered the departure of all nonemergency personnel from the US Embassy.