Where in the World Archives

November 2018 Issue

Pyramids of Meroe (Karima, Sudan)


The pyramids of Meroë, a UNESCO World Heritage Site located nearly 250 miles north of Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, were pictured in our September mystery photo. Near the town of Karima, the pyramids are situated along the eastern bank of the Nile, where Nubian kings once ruled the Kingdom of Kush, c. 750 BC-AD 350.

Centuries of erosion have damaged the pyramids and other structures, among which were several royal pyramids, 13 temples and three palaces. Inscriptions found in the temples and palaces at Meroë, along with ancient burial mounds in and around the nearby 300-foot-tall sandstone mountain Gebel Barkal, are representative of the Napatan and Meroitic cultures, spanning the years 2700 BC to AD 350.

Thirty-seven correct answers were submitted, and DONNA PETERSON of Patch Grove, Wisconsin, won the drawing. We thank Helga Smith of New York, New York, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Peter Basto, Newton, NJ; Shirley Becker, Skokie, IL; Mike Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Carla De Went, Grandville, MI; Mike & Yvonne Dixon, Washington, D.C.; Patricia Fwyer, Watertown, CT; Janice Gay, Vero Beach, FL; Helen Gigliotti, Sanger, CA; Brooks Goddard, Needham, MA; Beverly Green, Greeley, CO; Joy Hafner, Brooklyn, NY; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Magali V. Hinojosa, Laredo, TX; Samuel Leon Hochman, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Sarah Kirtland, New York, NY; Jason Kornmueller, Lake Forest, CA; Mary Lao, San Francisco, CA; Allan Little III, Atlanta, GA; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; Hazel C. Moss, St. Helens, OR; Arlene Obetts, Rockford, MI; Patricia Ove, Aurora, CO; Arne Pedersen, Little Silver, NJ; WINNER: Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Jim Randall, Sequim, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Jean Rusk, Park City, UT; C.T. (Samantha) Sartain, Colorado Springs, CO; Ed Schlenk, Marshalltown, IA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Regine Schumacher, Seal Beach, CA.
Pyramids of Meroe (Karima, Sudan)

Liberty Statue (Budapest, Hungary)

October 2018 Issue

Liberty Statue (Budapest, Hungary)


The Szabadság Szobor (Hungarian for “Liberty Statue” or “Freedom Statue”), located in Budapest, Hungary, was pictured in our August 2018 mystery photo. Hungarian artist Zsigmond Kisfaludi Strobl sculpted the bronze female figure, which was first erected in 1947 in remembrance of the country's liberation from the Nazis by the Soviets during World War II.

Towering above the city at a height of 131 feet, the icon can be seen by all of Budapest. Standing atop Gellért Hill and an 85-foot-tall pedestal, the 46-foot-tall figure holds a large palm leaf in her hand. On either side are two shorter male figures representing “progress” and “evil.”

After the fall of Communism in 1989, the inscription on the statue was changed from, in part, “To the memory of the liberating Soviet heroes. . .” to “To the memory of those who sacrificed their lives for the independence, freedom and prosperity of Hungary.”

Forty-one correct answers were submitted, and KATHLEEN WOOD of Lakewood Ranch, Florida, won the drawing. ITN Assistant Editor Dan Barr took the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Nanci Alexander, Lexington, KY; Ralph Barrett, Knoxville, TN; Peter Basto, Newton, NJ; Shirley Becker, Skokie, IL; Rachel Bishar, Santa Barbara, CA; Lucyna Boyle, Mesa, AZ; William H. Brown, Baton Rouge, LA; Diane Casillo, Dallas, TX; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; John F. Dubay, Spokane, WA; Nancy England, Oak Ridge, TN; Rita Fisher, Des Moines, IA; Russell Gluck, Franklin Lakes, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Magali V. Hinojosa, Laredo, TX; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Deb Kalikow, Westford, MA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Margaret Kilgore, Sharpsburg, GA; Theodore Liebersfeld, Boynton Beach, FL; Milton Lilie, Rye, NY; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; Nick Melillo, Carlsbad. CA; Edith F. Moates, Norman, OK; Ron Oakham, Tucson, AZ; James Oerding, Capay, CA; David J. Patten, St. Petersburg, FL; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Lisa Robertiello, Burbank, CA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Ed Schlenk, Marshalltown, IA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Jacqueline Siegel, Davis, CA; Phyllis & David Stolls, Riverside, CA; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Karen Warburg, Seaside, CA; Kathy Wilhelm, Cary, NC; WINNER: Kathleen Wood, Lakewood Ranch, FL.

September 2018 Issue

Bridge of Peace (Tbilisi, Georgia)


Stretching a distance of nearly 500 feet across Georgia's Mtkvari (Kura) River, the bow-shaped pedestrian bridge shown in our July 2018 “mystery” photo is known as the Bridge of Peace, connecting Old Tbilisi with the capital's new district. Officially opened in May 2010, the bridge is reported to symbolize the country's transition from the past to a better future.

Italian architect Michele de Lucchi's design of the span includes over 1,200 custom LED fixtures that light up not only the bridge but both banks of the river. Four different types of programmed light displays are run every hour throughout the night.

Forty-seven correct answers were submitted this month, and KAREN WAGNER of Monarch Beach, California, won the drawing. We thank Michele Burgess of Huntington Beach, California, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Russell Adams, Reading, PA; Donna Amariglio, New York, NY; Mary Attick, Lititz, PA; Shirley Becker, Skokie, IL; Lucyna Boyle, Mesa, AZ; Laurie Campbell, Levittown, NY; Kay Casey, San Francisco, CA; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Michael Dixon, Washington, D.C.; Steve Emmet, Encinitas, CA; William Fitzgerald, Torrance, CA; Stanley Gorcik, Buffalo Grove, IL; Susan Greek, Corona, CA; James Hamel, Monroeville, PA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Sarah Kirtland, New York, NY; Robert Kowalczyk, North Dartmouth, MA; William A. Lang, Tucson, AZ; Theodore Liebersfeld, Boynton Beach, FL; René Mutchler, Port Lavaca, TX; Phyllis Niemela, Gold Canyon, AZ; Earl K. Mack, San Ramon, CA; David J. Patten, St. Petersburg, FL; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Robyn E. Rishe, Monterey Park, CA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Jocelyn L. Ross, Cherry Hill, NJ; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Eileen Schattner, Alhambra, CA; Ed Schlenk, Marshalltown, IA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; James P. Sibley, Houston, TX; Christina Skinner, Lawrenceville, GA; Judy Spielman, Philadelphia, PA; Janet & Don Steig, South Orange, NJ; John Stern, Los Angeles, CA; Lina Treleaven, Pinellas Park, FL; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; WINNER: Karen Wagner, Monarch Beach, CA; John Williamson, Beavercreek, OH; James Wolfe, Bloomfield Hills, MI; Margaret J. Zimmerman, Austin, TX.
Bridge of Peace (Tbilisi, Georgia)

Botchan Karakuri Clock (Matsuyama, Japan)

August 2018 Issue

Botchan Karakuri Clock (Matsuyama, Japan)


In Matsuyama in 1994, Dōgo Onsen Honkan, one of the oldest public bathhouses in Japan, celebrated its 100th anniversary. In commemoration, the Botchan Karakuri Clock (the subject of our June 2018 mystery photo) was built near the hot springs, steps away from the Dōgo Onsen tram station.

Located in the Hōjōen plaza, the clock “comes to life” each hour between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m., when mechanical figures depicting characters in the Japanese novel “Botchan,” written by Natsume Sōseki, emerge to act out scenes from the story. Next to the clock is a footbath that is free to all visitors.

Starting Jan. 15, 2019, various parts of the bathhouse will be closed for renovations over several years.

Eleven correct answers were submitted this month, and KARYN KANDELL of Kyoto, Japan, won the drawing. We thank John Penisten of Hilo, Hawaii, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Russell Gluck, Franklin Lakes, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; WINNER: Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, JAPAN; Melanie Lathen, Sebastopol, CA; David & Yoko Light, St. Louis, MO; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Karen Wagner, Monarch Beach, CA.

July 2018 Issue

Chaukhtatgyi Buddha Temple (Yangon, Myanmar)


Tucked behind the 216-foot-long reclining Buddha at the Chaukhtatgyi Buddha Temple in Yangon, Myanmar, is a row of 33 smaller statues, each one demonstrating a different mudra (hand position) used by the Buddha. Many were pictured here in the May 2018 issue.

Construction of the original large Buddha was sponsored by a wealthy Burmese Buddhist (U Po Tha) in 1899. After its completion in 1907, however, it was decided that the statue's face appeared aggressive, so the image was destroyed in the 1950s and work began on a new image. The new statue was consecrated in 1973.

Six correct answers were submitted this month, and CLARK MASTERS of Westborough, Massachusetts, won the drawing. We thank George Anderson of Minneapolis, Minnesota, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Trixie Bentley, Los Gatos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; WINNER: Clark Masters, Westborough, MA; Audrey Moore, Naples, FL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Barbara Ryan, Naples, FL.
Chaukhtatgyi Buddha Temple (Yangon, Myanmar)

Avalanche memorial (Seydisfjordur, Iceland)

June 2018 Issue

Avalanche memorial (Seydisfjordur, Iceland)


In 1885 in the town of Seyðisfjörður in eastern Iceland, an avalanche swept several homes into the fjord and killed 24 people. In 1996 in the same town, another avalanche wiped out a fish factory, leaving several of the factory's girders mangled. Luckily, no lives were lost in the 1996 event, but the twisted girders were painted white and erected to create a memorial to those who had previously died. It was named “Snjóflóð” (“Avalanche”).

As the author wrote in his guidebook “Rick Steves Iceland,” “Scenic as they are, the steep mountain walls around Seyðisfjörður come with a steep price: the danger of being buried by snow.”

The strange sculpture was pictured in the mystery photo in our April 2018 issue. Two correct answers were submitted this month, and RAYMOND PRINCE of Maple Valley, Washington, won the drawing. We thank Linda Beuret of Santa Barbara, California, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY.

May 2018 Issue

National Tea House (Hisor, Tajikistan)


Called one of the world's most "magnificent" and "unusual" buildings when it was inaugurated in the city of Hisor on Oct. 27, 2015, Tajikistan's 2-story National Tea House is large enough to accommodate 2,000 people. Located 9 miles west of the country's capital of Dushanbe, Hisor is the capital of the Hisor District. The 141-foot-tall structure, which from a distance looks like a giant watermelon, was the image shown in our March 2018 mystery photo. Melons are an important crop in Tajikistan and the surrounding area.

Two correct answers were submitted this month, and ERIKA DAILEDA of Torrance, California, won the drawing. We thank Jim Royle of San Diego, California, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Erika Daileda, Torrance, CA; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI.
National Tea House (Hisor, Tajikistan)

Rendall Doocot (The Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland)

April 2018 Issue

Rendall Doocot (The Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland)


Nearly four centuries ago, in 1648, to be exact, a structure for birds was built for the lairds of the Hall of Rendall on The Mainland, which is the main island of Orkney, off the northeastern shore of Scotland. The location of the beehive-shaped structure, known as the Rendall Doocot and pictured in our February 2018 issue, was the challenge.

Young pigeons were considered a delicacy in ancient Rome, and the dovecotes housing them were a common sight. Centuries later, the Normans introduced dovecotes (doocots) to Britain. The Rendall Doocot's beehive or wedding-cake shape sets it apart from others in the area, since most are rectangular with lean-to roofs.

Five correct answers were submitted, and JANE B. and CLYDE F. HOLT of Hinesburg, Vermont, won the drawing. We thank Gordon Kitchens of Atlanta, Georgia, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA.

March 2018 Issue

Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana - Lake Titicaca, Bolivia


Built on the shore of Lake Titicaca, within Bolivia and near Peru, is a basilica that was built in the mid-16th century. The full name of this Spanish-colonial shrine — the subject of our January 2018 mystery photo — is the Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana. Originally built by the Dominicans, it was first rebuilt between 1610 and 1651. The present basilica was completed in 1805.

Inside the shrine is a carefully preserved, 4-foot-tall statue of the Virgen de la Candelaria (aka Dark Virgin of the Lake), sculpted from maguey wood in 1580 by Francisco Tito Yupanqui. In April 2013, thieves stripped the statue of many of its gold and silver accessories, including the sculpture of the baby Jesus. However, the theft has not lessened the popularity of the basilica and the statue as objects of reverence.

Twenty-two correct answers were submitted, and LEE ROSATI of Williamsville, New York, won the drawing. We thank Nick Stooke of O'Fallon, Illinois, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Alla Campbell, Greensboro, GA; Edwin “Toby” Earl, Laguna Beach, CA; Russell Gluck, Franklin Lakes, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; William C. Ives, Chapel Hill, NC; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Ron Lambert, Bend, OR; Dan Lundberg, North Miami, FL; Tim Meyer, Las Vegas, NV; James B. Oerding, Capay, CA; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; WINNER: Lee Rosati, Williamsville, NY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; James P. Sibley, Houston, TX; Kay Stevens, Santa Barbara, CA; Subhadra Suresh, Wyoming, OH; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Violet White, Carmel, IN; Blake Whitehead, Fremont, CA.
Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana - Lake Titicaca, Bolivia

Old Town Clock - Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

February 2018 Issue

Old Town Clock - Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada


Known as the Town Clock (or Old Town Clock or Citadel Clock Tower), the clock tower seen in the December 2017 mystery photo stands on Citadel Hill in the city of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and its clock has been keeping accurate time for over 214 years.

The structure was built from 1801 to 1803 after being commissioned by Prince Edward, commander-in-chief of the North American British military forces at the time. (It is said the prince hoped to resolve the local garrison's problem with tardiness.) The 3-tiered, irregular-octagon tower was built atop a one-story, Palladian-style, white clapboard building.

In 1960, the outer facade was restored to its original Georgia appearance. The faces of the clock were restored in 2005. To minimize stress on the mechanism, the clock is wound twice a week.

Twenty-three correct answers were submitted, and CHARLES TWINE of Durham, North Carolina, won the drawing. We thank Jonathan van Bilsen of Port Perry, Ontario, Canada, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Norman Barrett, Knoxville, TN; Sally Bingley, Richmond, VA; Michael Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Suzanne DeLong, Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada; Donald Eager, San Jose, CA; Ed & Jasi Faker, Rochester, NY; Fidel E. Gaviola, Mesa, AZ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Robert Hetzler, Bay City, MI; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Bill Johannes, Columbus, OH; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Mary Lao, San Francisco, CA; Janet Leonard, Winnetka, IL; Susan Levine, Falls Church, VA; Theodore Liebersfeld, Boynton Beach, FL; Edith Moates, Norman, OK; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Ben Seidman, Longmont, CO; WINNER: Charles Twine, Durham, NC.