Where in the World Archives

'Big Seated' sculpture (Würzburg, Germany)

February 2020 Issue

'Big Seated' sculpture (Würzburg, Germany)


Gazing into the sky while seated on a stairway between the Würzburg Cathedral (Dom St. Kilian) and the Museum am Dom in the Bavarian city of Würzburg, Germany, is a life-sized iron statue that looks more like a mummy than a man. Known as the “Big Seated,” this statue was the subject of our December mystery photo.

Several years ago, after the short flight of stairs was added to improve the square's appearance, city planners realized that the stairs posed a safety hazard and ordered the museum to add a railing. Not wanting to ruin the aesthetics, the museum instead asked German artist Maria Lehnen to create a statue, which was then placed in a central spot at the top of the stairs. It's been said the bound-up man represents a way of following the letter of the law but not its spirit.

Fourteen correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the December photo, and SIGNE HAUGEN of San Carlos, California, won the drawing. We thank Wanda Bahde of Summerfield, Florida, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Thomasina Gurule, Jamestown, TN; Nancy Hamilton, Red Lodge, MT; WINNER: Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Edward Pinsky, Montrose, NY; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Linda Vargo, Laguna Beach, CA.

January 2020 Issue

Abbaye Notre-Dame de Sénanque (Provence, France)


Founded in 1148 by Cistercian monks, the Sénanque Abbey (Abbaye Notre-Dame de Sénanque) was the fourth Cistercian abbey founded in Provence, France. The abbey is the building pictured in our November mystery photo.

Other structures at the site were built over the next few centuries, most during the 13th and 14th centuries. During that time, the abbey operated four mills, seven granges and large estates in Provence. The lands were auctioned off during the French Revolution and, for a time, used as a farm. The French government bought the land in 1846, but serious renovation of the buildings didn't start until the 1990s.

Twenty-two correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in our November mystery photo, and TIMOTHY SLATER of New Orleans, Louisiana, won the drawing. We thank Nanci Alexander of Lexington, Kentucky, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Bill Bittner, Lake Worth, FL; Judith & Chet Bowie, Kaneohe, HI; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Mary Carlson, Mission Viejo, CA; Michael Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Greg Duckworth, Charlotte, NC; Rita K. Fisher, Des Moines, IA; Brinda Gala, Johnson City, TN; Benjamin Glick, Naples, FL; John Haseman, Grand Junction, CO; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Allan Little III, Atlanta, GA; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Ron Oakham, Phoenix, AZ; Robert Ono, Davis, CA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; WINNER: Timothy Slater, New Orleans, LA; Martha Sternitzke, New Orleans, LA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Jim Wenck, Carlsbad, CA.
Abbaye Notre-Dame de Sénanque (Provence, France)

Mausoleum of António Agostinho Neto (Luanda, Angola)

December 2019 Issue

Mausoleum of António Agostinho Neto (Luanda, Angola)


The final resting place of the first president of Angola (and the subject of our October photo), the Mausoleum of António Agostinho Neto rises, obelisk-like, 393 feet from the center of Luanda, the capital of Angola. Despite Neto's having died in 1979, the brutalist-style mausoleum was not completed until 2012.

As well as being a politician, Neto was known in his native country as an accomplished poet. According to some, the design of the monument is based on his poem “A Path to the Stars.” During its construction, it was locally nicknamed “Sputnik” due to its spaceship-like shape.

Ten correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in our October mystery photo, and DONNA PETERSON of Patch Grove, Wisconsin, won the drawing. We thank Gunter and Ginny Arndt of Solomons, Maryland, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

John Haseman, Grand Junction, CO; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Justine Kirby, New York, NY; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; WINNER: Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; JoAnn Schwartz, Los Altos, CA.

November 2019 Issue

"La Conversacion" sculpture (Old Havana, Cuba)


In Cuba, Old Havana saw a new addition to its Plaza de San Francisco de Asís in May 2012. The bronze abstract statue seen in the September mystery photo portrays two people having a conversation. Mounted on a marble slab, “La Conversación” was created by French sculptor Etienne and donated to the city by Havana's French ambassador, Vittorio Perrota.

The missing portions of the bodies are said to represent the need to “read between the lines” when talking with others, not to mention the importance of communicating face to face instead of through social media or texting.

Twenty-three correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in our September mystery photo, and EUGENE ADELMANN of St. Louis, Missouri, won the drawing. We thank Skip Carpenter of Coronado, California, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Eugene Adelmann, St. Louis, MO; Antoinette Anderson, Carson, CA; Bobbi Benson, Burlingame, CA; BJ Bjorklund, Frisco, TX; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; John C. Deppman, Fort Myers, FL; Barbara L. Fenby, Marlborough, MA; Elizabeth Hamel, Monroeville, PA; Joan Hollis, Torrance, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Melanie Jones, Cathedral City, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Beth Klob, La Junta, CO; William A. Lang, Tucson, AZ; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; David J. Patten, St. Petersburg, FL; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Lyn Scanlon, Naples, FL; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Louise Talley, Wauna, WA; John Williamson, Beavercreek, OH.
"La Conversacion" sculpture (Old Havana, Cuba)

Il Pozzo dei Grifi e dei Leoni (Montepulciano, Italy)

October 2019 Issue

Il Pozzo dei Grifi e dei Leoni (Montepulciano, Italy)


Almost 500 years ago, in 1520, Renaissance architect Antonio da Sangallo (Sangallo the Elder) built the structure shown in our August mystery photo. Sometimes referred to as a fountain, the well is called Il Pozzo dei Grifi e dei Leoni (the Well of the Griffins and Lions), and it can be found in the Tuscan town of Montepulciano, central Italy.

Located in the Piazza Grande, the well is situated between the Palazzo Nobili Tarugi and the Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo. Two stone lions sitting atop it hold the Medici coat of arms.

Twenty-four correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in our August mystery photo, and MICHAEL BRANDT of El Dorado Hills, California, won the drawing. We thank Gordon Kitchens of Atlanta, Georgia, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by: Nanci Alexander, Lexington, KY; Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Vince Anderson, Tempe, AZ; Svetlana Bogorad, Cherry Hill, NJ; WINNER: Michael Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Rick Madden, Frisco, TX; Bill Mainar, Paris, TX; Barbara McMahon, Williamsburg, VA; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Carol Peim, Hedersonvile, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Charles Zahn, San Diego, CA.

September 2019 Issue

Sculpture of Hutton's Unconformity (Jedburgh, Scotland)


In May 2006 in southern Scotland, a serpentine-shaped sculpture was unveiled honoring the work of the scientist James Hutton, aka “the father of geology.” Titled “The Eel,” the sculpture represents Hutton's Unconformity, the rock formation at eastern Scotland's Siccar Point that inspired Hutton's revolutionary theories about the age of the Earth.

(One of several sites so labeled, the Siccar Point site comprises folded bands of vertical 435-million-year-old graywacke (a type of sandstone) overlain “unconformably” by layers of 370-million-year-old horizontal layers of red sandstone.)

Standing in Lothian Park in the town of Jedburgh, the 40-foot-long, 9-foot-high dry-stone sculpture was made from whinstone topped with sandstone by Scottish sculptor Max Nowell.

Three correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in our July mystery photo, and CYNTHIA ANCHONDO of Moreno Valley, California, won the drawing. We thank Brita Bishop of Dallas, Texas, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan.
Sculpture of Hutton's Unconformity (Jedburgh, Scotland)

Petrovaradin Fortress clock tower (Novi Sad, Serbia)

August 2019 Issue

Petrovaradin Fortress clock tower (Novi Sad, Serbia)


Over 300 years ago, the clock tower seen in our June 2019 “mystery photo” was created to be part of the Petrovaradin Fortress in Novi Sad, northern Serbia. On the tower, each of the four clock faces (measuring about 6½ feet in diameter) is unique in that the hour hand is long and the minute hand is short — the opposite of typical clocks. (Being able to see the hour from a distance came in handy for boatmen on the Danube River, which flows alongside the city.)

Construction of the tower spanned 88 years, from 1692 to 1780, during the reigns of several Austrian emperors. Today, the clock still operates and rings each hour.

Twenty-six correct answers were submitted, and RAYMOND PRINCE of Maple Valley, Washington, won the drawing. We thank Dave Bentzin of Casper, Wyoming, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Dean Aulick, Silver Spring, MD; Rachel Bishar, Santa Barbara, CA; Mike Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Heidi Foggatt, Phoenix, AZ; Te Gurule, Jamestown, TN; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; W. Wayne Lindsey, Las Vegas, NV; Janell Lopus, Naples, FL; Milana Naddeo, Chesterbrook, PA; Ron Oakham, Tucson, AZ; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; WINNER: Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Rod Smith, Oskaloosa, KS; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.

July 2019 Issue

Veliki Tabor Castle (Croatia)


Including elements of Late Gothic and Renaissance architecture, the structure shown in our May mystery photo is a fort that has stood atop Mt. Hum Košnički in northwestern Croatia since the mid-15th century. Known as Veliki Tabor, the fort/castle is situated nearly 1,100 feet above sea level, providing views that stretch as far as Slovenia.

In the 18th century, the fort's four towers were converted into space for housing. During World War I, Veliki Tabor served as a prison. Subsequently, it was consigned to nuns and later used as a warehouse. In the late 1980s, the whole place was revitalized, with activities held there such as falconry and knight tournaments. In 2003, a museums organization took over, with financing from the Croatian Ministry of Culture.

Ten correct answers were submitted, and MARIA CUETO of Weehawken, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Pat Minami of Brookeville, Maryland, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; WINNER: Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Margo Mata, Carlsbad, CA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.
Veliki Tabor Castle (Croatia)

Statue of Ingolfur Arnarson (Reykjavik, Iceland)

June 2019 Issue

Statue of Ingolfur Arnarson (Reykjavik, Iceland)


Recognized as one of the first permanent Norse settlers of Reykjavík, Iceland, Ingólfur Arnarson is believed to have settled on the west coast of Iceland in 874, along with his wife and foster brother. In commemoration of Ingólfur's position as one of Reykjavík's founders, a bronze statue of him — pictured in the mystery photo in our April 2019 issue — was erected in the city in 1924.

For a brief period of time, Ingólfur was the legal owner of the southwestern portion of the island. Eventually, he donated or sold much of the land to Scandinavian colonists during what has been termed the Viking Age (late 8th to mid 11th centuries).

Near the center of Reykjavik, the statue of Ingólfur is located on the knoll Arnarhóll, on the eastern end of the Old Harbour.

Twenty-eight correct answers were submitted, and E. Marlin Causey of Marietta, Georgia, won the drawing. We thank Diane Harrison of Chesterfield, Missouri, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; WINNER: E. Marlin Causey, Marietta, GA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Steve Flexer, Gig Harbor, WA; Carla Gale, Denver, CO; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Anne Jinks, St. Clair Shores, MI; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Gert Kipnis, Tucker, GA; Thomas E. Lahmon, Anaheim, CA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Sandra L. Pelletier, Capay, CA; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Peter Smith, Streamwood, IL; John Stern, Los Angeles, CA; Karen Swenson, South Huntington, NY; Jean Woltjer, Holland, MI.

May 2019 Issue

'Courage' monument (Brest, Belarus)


Four years after the Central Committee of the Byelorussian Communist Party gave its approval for construction to begin on the Brest Hero Fortress, the war-memorial complex was opened on Sept. 25, 1971, in Brest, Belarus. Within the complex, the main monument, “Courage,” is the statue seen in our March mystery photo.

Portraying the head of a Soviet soldier with a banner behind him, the statue (cast concrete on a steel framework and hollow inside) measures 177 feet wide by 98 feet tall. Next to it is the 328-foot-tall Bayonet-Obelisk, bearing the names of those who died during the siege of Brest Fortress, in World War II's Operation Barbarossa, during the summer of 1941.

Thirty-two correct answers were submitted, and MARY SCHMIDT of Fairfax, Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Tony Leisner of Tarpon Springs, Florida, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Ronnie Allen, Bala Cynwyd, PA; Mary Attick, Lititz, PA; Rachel Bishar, Santa Barbara, CA; Larry Brown, Las Vegas, NV; Jim Carlton, Ponca City, OK; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Tom Conner, Scottsdale, AZ; Maria Cueto, Weekawken, NJ; Sherryl Frisch, Wimauma, FL; Stanley Gorcik, Buffalo Grove, IL; Marijke Grotz, Pasadena, CA; Thomasina Gurule, Jamestown, TN; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Natallia Khoshchynka, Hallandale Beach, FL; ert Kipnis, Tucker, GA; Robert Kowalczyk, North Dartmouth, MA; William Lang, Tucson, AZ; Mel McBeth, Concord, CA; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Sandra Pelletier, Capay, CA; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; WINNER: Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Allan Singer, Rolling Hills Estates, CA; Helga Smith, New York, NY; James Stefan, Sarasota, FL; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Kathryn Witmer, Bellingham, WA.
'Courage' monument (Brest, Belarus)