Where in the World Archives

November 2020 Issue

Brouq Nature Reserve (Qatar)


Visitors to Qatar's Brouq Nature Reserve who have seen “2001: A Space Odyssey” may be surprised to see something resembling the huge obelisk that appears in the 1968 film. However, the Qatar sculpture includes four “obelisks,” not just one. All four are visible in our September mystery photo.

Erected in 2014 and spanning a distance of about one kilometer, the 4-part sculpture known as “EAST-WEST/WEST-EAST” is made up of 4-inch-thick steel plates that stand between 48 and 55 feet high. Despite the differences in height, artist Richard Serra ensured that the tops of the plates would be level with each other, allowing for differences in topography. At the tip of the Zekreet Peninsula, the reserve is located about 45 miles of the country's capital, Doha — a 1- or 1½-hour drive away.

Ten correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the picture in the September 2020 issue, and CAROL PEIM of Hendersonville, North Carolina, won the drawing. We thank Lucyna Boyle of Mesa, Arizona, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Joan Barrett, Tucson, AZ; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Sherryl Frisch, Wimauma, FL; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; WINNER: Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Eileen Schattner, Alhambra, CA; Jennifer Schultz, Northbrook, IL.
Brouq Nature Reserve (Qatar)

House-Museum of the Farmer & the Monument to Fertility (Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain)

October 2020 Issue

House-Museum of the Farmer & the Monument to Fertility (Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain)


Rising to a height of 49 feet from the center of Lanzarote — fourth largest of Spain's Canary Islands — is a unique sculpture that is part of the island's Casa-Museo del Campesino y Monumento a la Fecundidad (House-Museum of the Farmer and the Monument to Fertility). Attractions include a museum of local handcrafts and a restaurant inside an underground volcanic cave.

Created from old water tanks by Jésus Soto in 1968 (following a design by native artist César Manrique), the sculpture is an example of the type of art César began creating in the mid 1960s in an effort to safeguard the island's natural heritage and culture.

Twelve correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the picture in the August 2020 issue, and KAREN WAGNER of Monarch Beach, California, won the drawing. We thank Rick Sinding of Princeton, New Jersey, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Jennifer Schultz, Northbrook, IL; Eric Tobin, Doylestown, PA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; WINNER: Karen Wagner, Monarch Beach, CA; James A. White, Omaha, NE.

September 2020 Issue

Mausoleum of Habib Bourguiba (Monastir, Tunisia)


The eventual occupant of the mausoleum pictured in our July mystery photo was still alive at the time it was completed in 1963. In fact, Habib Bourguiba, president of Tunisia from 1957 to 1987, lived until April 2000. Flanked by two 82-foot-tall minarets, the mausoleum — located on the western side of the Sidi el-Mézeri cemetery in the former president's hometown of Monastir — is topped by a gilded dome that sits between two green domes.

Bourguiba is often referred to as the “father of Tunisian independence.” During his presidency, a legal minimum age for marriage was established, and women were given the right to be educated, vote and hold public office.

Ten correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the picture, and ARNE PEDERSEN of Little Silver, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Helga Smith of New York, New York, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; James Hansen, Weeki Wachee, FL; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; WINNER: Arne Pedersen, Little Silver, NJ; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Karen Schaeffer, Tigard, OR; Eileen Schattner, Alhambra, CA; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA.
Mausoleum of Habib Bourguiba (Monastir, Tunisia)

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Cape Town, South Africa)

August 2020 Issue

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Cape Town, South Africa)


An unusual museum opened at the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront in Cape Town, South Africa, in September 2017: the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa.

From an idea by British designer Thomas Heatherwick, densely packed, 187-foot-tall concrete grain silos, originally constructed in 1921, were carved out to make a number of galleries and a large central atrium. The ovoid atrium — pictured in our June mystery photo — features angled cross-sections of the silos. The 9-story museum also has educational areas, a sculpture garden, a restaurant and a shop. On top of the museum is a 5-story hotel.

Seven correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the picture, and SIGRID SOUTHWORTH of Honolulu, Hawaii, won the drawing. We thank Thom Wilson of Scottsdale, Arizona, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Lucyna Boyle, Mesa, AZ; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Avi Ivan, West Hollywood, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Beth Powell, Eureka, CA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; WINNER: Sigrid B. Southworth, Honolulu, HI.

July 2020 Issue

St. Mark's Campanile (Venice, Italy)


Dominating the skyline of Venice, Italy, the 323-foot-tall St. Mark's Campanile is located in St. Mark's Square, and at its base is a loggia and balcony, all designed and built by Jacopo Sansovino between 1537 and 1549. The balcony was the subject of our May photo.

Three marble friezes, carved by students of Sansovino, front the balcony. The two seen in our May photo are (at left) the personification of Venice as the goddess of Justice, holding a sword and seated on a lion throne, and (to the right) an allegorical representation of the island of Cyprus, then part of the Venetian Republic. To the far left, not seen, is a representation of Crete.

Eight correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the photo, and RAYMOND PRINCE of Maple Valley, Washington, won the drawing. We thank David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Nanci Alexander, Lexington, KY; Lottaine Banfi, Jackson, NJ; Richard E. Hart, Renton, WA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; WINNER: Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Francine A. Silberman, Dunedin, FL.
St. Mark's Campanile (Venice, Italy)

Monument to Independence of Turkmenistan (Ashgabat)

June 2020 Issue

Monument to Independence of Turkmenistan (Ashgabat)


The structure shown in our April 2020 mystery photo is something that is seen by virtually everyone visiting Ashgabat, the capital of the Central Asian country of Turkmenistan. Sometimes referred to as “The Plunger,” the Monument to the Independence of Turkmenistan is 299 feet tall. Saparmurat Atayevich Niyazov, who ruled the country until his death in December 2006, ordered the monument's construction, which began in August 2006. (The country's date of independence was Oct. 27, 1991.)

The monument is surrounded by 27 gold-plated statues. The statue shown in the foreground of April's picture depicts Oguz Khan, a mythical figure usually considered to be the founder of the Turkmen people.

Fifty-eight correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the photo, and STEVEN CLIFT of North Little Rock, Arkansas, won the drawing. We thank Dan Lundberg of North Miami, Florida, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Lucyna Boyle, Mesa, AZ; Michael Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Debra Brown, Malvern, OH; Bob Canepa, Mill Valley, CA; Michael Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; WINNER: Steven A. Clift, North Little Rock, AR; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Erika Daileda, Torrance, CA; John Deppman, Fort Myers, FL; David Eickhoff, Burton, TX; Sandy & Jim Farrell, Fort Worth, TX; William Fitzgerald, Torrance, CA; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Loren Gardner, San Diego, CA; Stanley Gorcik, Buffalo Grove, IL; Susan Greek, Corona, CA; Brice Harris, Pasadena, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Margaret Kilgore, Sharpsburg, GA; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Susan Kipp, Oyster Bay, NY; Sarah Kirtland, New York, NY; Kathryn Kostrub, Landisville, PA; Fred Kranz, Potomac, MD; Mary Lao, San Francisco, CA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Greg Mannion, Fountain Hills, AZ; William B. Mason, Jr., Tampa, FL; Bennetta McLaughlin, Dallas, TX; Ron Merlo, Glendale, CA; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Tom O'Hara, San Luis Obispo, CA; David J. Patten, St. Petersburg, FL; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Tricia Schierman, Richland, WA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Rick Sinding, Princeton, NJ; Yvette Wigman-Childers, Honolulu, HI; Steven Zhong, South San Francisco, CA; Margaret J. Zimmerman, Austin, TX.

May 2020 Issue

Empress of Ireland Pavilion (Rimouski, Québec, Canada)


Just two years after the sinking of the Titanic, another maritime disaster, one that took the lives of more than 1,000 passengers, occurred near the mouth of the St. Lawrence River in northeastern Canada. On May 29, 1914, the RMS Empress of Ireland collided with a Norwegian ship, the SS Storstad, and sank within 14 minutes.

In commemoration, the Empress of Ireland Pavilion, designed to resemble a sinking ship, was built at the Pointe-au-Pere Maritime Historic Site near Rimouski, Québec, and opened in 2000. More than 200 artifacts from the wreck are displayed in the museum, along with photos and written accounts from passengers and their descendants. Visitors also can experience a multimedia show called “The Last Journey.”

Ten correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the March photo, and PAMELA ROSS of Louisville, Kentucky, won the drawing. We thank Marilyn Jestes of Roulette, Pennsylvania, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Graham C. Miller, Alhambra, CA; Ardith Ortgies, Des Moines, IA; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; WINNER: Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA.
Empress of Ireland Pavilion (Rimouski, Québec, Canada)

Big Fiddle of the Ceilidh (Nova Scotia, Canada)

April 2020 Issue

Big Fiddle of the Ceilidh (Nova Scotia, Canada)


Any attraction referred to as “world's largest” is likely to be at least a little bit famous, so it's no wonder so many of our readers correctly named the location in our February mystery photo.

What is believed to be the world's largest illuminated fiddle stands on the waterfront next to the Joan Harriss Cruise Pavilion in Sydney, on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada. Designed by Sydney artist Cyril Hearn, the 60-foot-tall, solid-steel fiddle was unveiled in January 2005.

In honor of the area's Celtic community, the fiddle was officially named Fidheal Mhor A' Ceilidh, or Big Fiddle of the Ceilidh. (Ceilidh is Gaelic for “social visit.”)

Seventy-four correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the February photo, and MARVIN SOFFER of Boynton Beach, Florida, won the drawing. We thank Susan Darsey of La Selva Beach, California, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Eugene Adelmann, St. Louis, MO; Lynn Boreson, Madison, WI; Lucyna Boyle, Mesa, AZ; Mark A. Brown & Cathy Wooley-Brown, Brandon, FL; Mary Carlson, Mission Viejo, CA; Anna Causey, Marietta, GA; Jill Cohen, Stony Brook, NY; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Patricia de la Cuesta, Redondo Beach, CA; John C. Deppman, Fort Myers, FL; Donald Eager, San Jose, CA; Diane Powell Ferguson, Scottsdale, AZ; Patricia Fickess, Fresno, CA; Amelia Finan, Annapolis, MD; Linda Fornelli, Carlsbad, CA; Mary Lou Fournier, Oro Valley, AZ; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Charmaine Furman, Palo Alto, CA; Judy Garrett, Rochester Hills, MI; Russell Gluck, Franklin Lakes, NJ; Ken Gould, Clearwater, FL; Jane A. Green, Montvale, NJ; Cheri Guariglia, Pompano Beach, FL; S. Hains, Austin, TX; Lynn Harris, Plano, TX; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jim Hinkle, Alameda, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Kembell Huyke, Flushing, NY; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Beryl Kay, San Francisco, CA; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Gert Kipnis, Tucker, GA; Judee Kline, Cecil, WI; Jason Kornmueller, Lake Forest, CA; George O. Lange, San Diego, CA; Mary Lao, San Francisco, CA; George Lauscher, Pocono Summit, PA; Vince Liggio, Norwalk, CT; John Lucas, Richmond, VA; John Maas, Raleigh, NC; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; Sharon A. Mazurek, Grosse Pointe Woods, MI; Barbara McMahon, Williamsburg, VA; Pat McMindes, Plano, TX; Robert Morton, St. Louis, MO; Jack Moss, Flowery Branch, GA; Barry & Ann Muhs, Rochester, NY; Dave Netzer, West Barnstable, MA; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; David O'Donnell, Sacramento, CA; Sari E. Oosta, Owens Cross Roads, AL; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Glenn Peterson, Carlsbad, CA; Beth Podol, El Paso, TX; Betty Podol, Reston, VA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Robert Quillin, Centennial, CO; Deb Riley, De Pere, WI; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Wanda Ross, Tucson, AZ; Barbara Ryan, Naples, FL; Lorenz Rychner, Denver, CO; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Charles Shelleman, Arlington, VA; James Smith, Gilbert, AZ; WINNER: Marvin Soffer, Boynton Beach, FL; Shawn Sweeney, Santa Fe, NM; Ken Turja, Indialantic, FL; John Weiss, Canton, CT; Phil Youngberg, Dunwoody, GA.

March 2020 Issue

Our Lady of the Assumption Cathedral (Granada, Nicaragua)


According to some sources, the first version of Our Lady of the Assumption Cathedral (the subject of our January mystery photo), located in Granada, Nicaragua, was built almost 500 years ago, in 1525. Despite its having suffered fires twice by 1578 (the original building included a straw roof), it became known as La Iglesia Bonita (The Beautiful Church). It wasn't until 1751 that the structure was rebuilt with more durable materials: stone and and brick.

In 1856, the church was completely destroyed by American-born mercenary William Walker. In 1915, three years after the Roman Catholic Church created the Diocese of Granada, the church was rebuilt, its central dome now with an iron frame. In 1972, the yellow-and-white Spanish-colonial structure would reach its full measure, almost 39,000 square feet.

Twenty-one correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the January photo, and PIOTR KUMELOWSKI of Forest Hills, New York, won the drawing. We thank Jim Simpson of Glen Mills, Pennsylvania, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Michael Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Jose N. Cruz, San Antonio, TX; Juanjo Cuenca, Hollywood, FL; Marcia Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Robert Havlen, Albuquerque, NM; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; David Jack, Modesto, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; WINNER: Piotr Kumelowski, Forest Hills, NY; William B. Mason, Jr., Memphis, TN; Peggy Nute, Palo Alto, CA; Arne Pedersen, Little Silver, NJ; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Robert H. Rhoads, Sullivan, MO; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Karen Schaeffer, Tigard, OR; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Helga Smith, New York, NY; Linda Tabb, Champaign, IL.
Our Lady of the Assumption Cathedral (Granada, Nicaragua)

'Big Seated' sculpture (Würzburg, Germany)

February 2020 Issue

'Big Seated' sculpture (Würzburg, Germany)


Gazing into the sky while seated on a stairway between the Würzburg Cathedral (Dom St. Kilian) and the Museum am Dom in the Bavarian city of Würzburg, Germany, is a life-sized iron statue that looks more like a mummy than a man. Known as the “Big Seated,” this statue was the subject of our December mystery photo.

Several years ago, after the short flight of stairs was added to improve the square's appearance, city planners realized that the stairs posed a safety hazard and ordered the museum to add a railing. Not wanting to ruin the aesthetics, the museum instead asked German artist Maria Lehnen to create a statue, which was then placed in a central spot at the top of the stairs. It's been said the bound-up man represents a way of following the letter of the law but not its spirit.

Fourteen correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in the December photo, and SIGNE HAUGEN of San Carlos, California, won the drawing. We thank Wanda Bahde of Summerfield, Florida, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Thomasina Gurule, Jamestown, TN; Nancy Hamilton, Red Lodge, MT; WINNER: Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Edward Pinsky, Montrose, NY; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Linda Vargo, Laguna Beach, CA.