Where in the World Archives

November 2021 Issue

"La Pleureuse" ["The Mourner"] (Hakone Open-Air Museum, Japan)


One of the most unusual sculptures in the world lies in central Japan's Hakone Open-Air Museum, an outdoor sculpture park that "plays with nature." The museum is in the eastern part of the town of Hakone, which is about 60 miles south of Tokyo on the country's main island, Honshu.

"La Pleureuse" ("The Mourner") is the name of the artwork, pictured in our September mystery photo. Created by husband-and-wife team François-Xavier and Claude Lalanne in 1986, the head was carved from a huge piece of Italian Trani limestone and placed in a pond that is perpetually filled with water ... keeping alive the sculpture's "hair" of bright green leaves. Both artists were well known for combining flora and fauna in unique ways.

Fourteen correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and KARYN KANDELL of Kyoto, Japan, won the drawing. We thank Daissy Prada Owen of Iowa City, Iowa, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Tom Bulloch, Woodland Park, CO; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; William Fitzgerald, Torrance, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Scott Kammer, Centerville, MN; WINNER: Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Beth Powell, Eureka, CA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Walter & Jeanne Schwartz, San Mateo, CA; Gary Spinks, DeWitt, MI; Cheryl Sullivan, Skiatook, OK; Ann White, Concord, CA.
"La Pleureuse" ["The Mourner"] (Hakone Open-Air Museum, Japan)

La Statue de Sainte-Genevieve (Paris, France)

October 2021 Issue

La Statue de Sainte-Genevieve (Paris, France)


The story behind the statue in our August mystery photo begins with a woman named Geneviève. She was born in Nanterre, France, circa 423 and later moved to Paris. She was a young woman when Parisians feared an invasion by Attila the Hun. Genevieve refused to flee and urged others to remain in the city and pray. When Attila bypassed Paris, people believed a miracle had occurred. Geneviève was later declared the patroness saint of Paris.

In 1928, the 18-foot-tall La Statue de Sainte-Geneviève (atop a 46-foot-tall base) was built on the Pont de la Tournelle bridge, spanning the Seine in Paris. Sculptor Paul Landowski had wanted the statue to face west toward Notre Dame, but city officials preferred that it face the opposite direction, toward the enemy troops that never arrived.

Seventeen correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and WILLIS FRICK of San Clemente, California, won the drawing. We thank Gordon Kitchens of Atlanta, Georgia, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Peter Beuret, Santa Barbara, CA; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Mary Carlson, Mission Viejo, CA; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; WINNER: Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Sylvie Gould, Cumming, GA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Robin Parker, Little Rock, AR; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Paula Prindle, Orient, OH; Lenny Lianne Resch, Peoria, AZ; Jean Schroeder, Redding, CT; Jennifer Schultz, Northbrook, IL; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Catherine Vernon, Osprey, FL.

September 2021 Issue

Catedral de la Inmaculada Concepción


Located in Cuenca, Ecuador, the Catedral de la Inmaculada Concepción (seen in our July mystery photo) is also known as Catedral Nueva (New Cathedral). It was constructed over 90 years, from 1885 to 1975, and it replaced the smaller Old Cathedral, located nearby.

Due to a calculation error by the architect, German-born friar Johannes Bautista Stiehle, the bell towers had to be shortened because their foundations couldn't support the intended height of the towers. Topping the cathedral are three large domes covered by blue and white glazed tile imported from Czechoslovakia. The cathedral's floor is made of pink marble from Carrara, Italy.

Thirteen correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and CATHY BRINER of Eugene, Oregon, won the drawing. We thank Stephen Addison of Charlotte, North Carolina, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER:  Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Ann Cabot, Austin, TX; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Robyn Rishe, Monterey Park, CA; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Helga Smith, New York,NY; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.
Catedral de la Inmaculada Concepción

Conakry Grand Mosque (Conakry, Guinea)

August 2021 Issue

Conakry Grand Mosque (Conakry, Guinea)


The mystery photo in our June issue showed the interior of a mosque in Conakry, Guinea, that was completed in 1982. The Grande Mosquée de Conakry, or the Conakry Grand Mosque, was built during the administration of Guinea's first president, Ahmed Sékou Touré, with funding from King Fahd of Saudi Arabia.

The mosque has room for 10,000 men on the lower level and 2,500 women on the upper level. There is also space for an additional 12,500 worshipers in the mosque's large esplanade.

This time, only ONE correct answer was submitted naming the location in the picture. The prize goes to CYNTHIA ANCHONDO of Moreno Valley, California. We thank Hugh Randall of Jacksonville, Florida, for submitting the photo.

July 2021 Issue

Palacio de Valle (Cienfuegos, Cuba)


Built by Italian architect Alfredo Colli during the years 1913-17, the Palacio de Valle in the harbor of Cienfuegos, Cuba (pictured in our May mystery photo), is a blend of three types of architecture: Gothic, Venetian and neo-Moorish.

Originally intended to be the private home of a local businessman (Celestino Caces), the palace was sold to a wealthy Spaniard before construction was complete.

Decades later, Fulgencio Batista (Cubas president in 1940-44 and dictator in 1952-59) had planned to convert the colorful, eclectic palace into a casino until Fidel Castro came to power in the 1959 revolution. The palace is now a restaurant with a rooftop bar.

Twenty-four correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and FRED STEINBERG of New York, New York, won the drawing. We thank Nick and Michaele Stooke of OFallon, Illinois, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Ginny Gunter Arndt, Solomons, MD; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Linda Elzer, Wading River, NY; Heidi Foggatt, Phoenix, AZ; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Laurel Glassman, Chevy Chase, MD; Susan Hamilton, Boulder, CO; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; David Jack, Modesto, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Gert Kipnis, Tucker, GA; Sarah Kirtland, New York, NY; Sylvia Levi, Sherman Oaks, CA; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Vicki Reed, San Diego, CA; Sandy Robson, Brunswick, OH; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Leslie Russum, Broomfield, CO; WINNER: Fred Steinberg, New York, NY; Mary Turney, Fair Play, SC.
Palacio de Valle (Cienfuegos, Cuba)

Qutb Minar (Delhi, India)

June 2021 Issue

Qutb Minar (Delhi, India)


Eighteen miles southeast of Delhi, India, stands the Qutb Minar, a structure dating back to the early 13th century and an unforgettable sight for anyone visiting the area. The 240-foot-tall minaret, measuring 49 feet in diameter at the base and 8 feet across at the top, was built in celebration of the Muslims' conquest over Delhi's Hindu rule in the late 12th century.

Its construction began in 1193 under the authority of Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the city's first Muslim ruler. Red standstone was used to create the first three stories of the 5-story tower, and the top two stories were made of marble and sandstone. The top story, however, wasn't completed until 1385.

One hundred-one (!) correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and LINDA CRAIN of Signal Hill, California, won the drawing. We thank Stephen Addison of Charlotte, North Carolina, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Dr. Adi Adens, Walnut Creek, CA; Emanuela Allgood, Fremont, CA; Lisa Anway, Pebble Beach, CA; Deepak Awasthi, Destrehan, LA; Erna Bailey, Reno, NV; Shelly L. Bednar, Temecula, CA; Rosalba Benitez, Las Vegas, NV; Bobbi Benson, Burlingame, CA; Anna Berg, Deerfield, IL; Sejal Bhatt, Fort Mill, SC; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Georgia Briscoe, Lafayette, CO; Rick Bush, Helena, MT; Emerald Causey, Marietta, GA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Robert Coffman, Green Cove Springs, FL; WINNER: Linda Crain, Signal Hill, CA; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Sue Cutler, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Joel & Elaine Daniels, Canby, OR; Fay Denzler, Encino, CA; John C. Deppman, Fort Myers, FL; James Downs, Lafayette, CO; Debra Minar Driscoll, Dallas, OR; Beverly Epstein, New York, NY; Lois Fate, Puyallup, WA; Heidi Foggatt, Phoenix, AZ; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Russell Gluck, Franklin Lakes, NJ; Brooks Goddard, Needham, MA; Sylvie Gould, Cumming, GA; Susan Greek, Corona, CA; Laura Hall, San Diego, CA; Jan Harvey, San Antonio, TX; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Bob Havlen, Albuquerque, NM; Sally Heath, Santa Rosa, CA; Samuel Leon Hochman, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Gordon Hostetler, Elkhart, IN; Kembell Huyke, Flushing, NY; Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Steve Jones, Fiddletown, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Janice Kolbaska, Mt. Prospect, IL; Madalyn Kolton, Roseville, MI; Robert Kowalczyk, North Dartmouth, MA; Ken Lammers, Cleveland, OH; Julie Leanna, Little Suamico, WI; Tony Lee, San Francisco, CA; Vincent Liggio, Norwalk, CT; W. Wayne Lindsey, Las Vegas, NV; Sandra Loebs, Murrells Inlet, SC; Laura Lorman, Sunnyvale, CA; Melissa Anne Lum, Fort Worth, TX; Janet McGary, Medford, OR; Bennetta McLaughlin, Dallas, TX; Barbara Morgan, Shelbyville, TN; Frank Morris, Mt. Vernon, WA; Asish Mukherjee, Maumee, OH; Tony Nies, Corte Madera, CA; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Mike & Connie O'Dwyer, Millbrae, CA; Tom O'Hara, San Luis Obispo, CA; Dr. & Mrs. Francis Pease, Leawood, KS; Steve Piccolo, Seattle, WA; Edward Pinsky, Montrose, NY; Beth Podol, El Paso, TX; Betty Podol, Reston, VA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; William Raffel, Rockville, MD; Jim Randall, Sequim, WA; Carolyn Rawles, Corvallis, OR; Preston Reeves, Seguin, TX; Marcia Reynolds, Orange, CA; Marcia Ritter, Kirkwood, MO; Henry D. Rogers, Jacksonville, FL; Turner Rogers, Mobile, AL; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Irwin Schatzman, Scottsdale, AZ; Jimmy Schottel, Basehor, KS; Jennifer Schultz, Northbrook, IL; Richard Sherrick, Greensboro, NC; James Sibley, Spring, TX; Sheila Siener, Exeter, NH; Rick Sinding, Princeton, NJ; Janet Smith, Grosse Pointe Farms, MI; Ben Hinson & Jamie Stamey, Sherrills Ford, NC; Larry Szymczak, Chicago, IL; Leo Tallieu, Northville, MI; Nancy Toledo, Rio Vista, CA; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Faz Ulla, San Jose, CA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Robert Vancreveld, Portland, OR; Karen Wagner, Monarch Beach, CA; Brian Weaver, Burlington, KY; Eve Wertsch, San Francisco, CA; Richard A. Wood, Lancaster, CA; Nellie Ziegler, Tucson, AZ; Valerie Zorich, Napa, CA.

May 2021 Issue

Great Enclosure, Great Zimbabwe (southeastern Zimbabwe)


With an outer wall measuring up to 32 feet high in spots, the Great Enclosure is part of a complex of granite structures called Great Zimbabwe, the ruins of which cover almost 1,800 acres in what is now southeastern Zimbabwe. It was built by the Shona tribe, part of the Bantu civilization, from the 11th to 15th centuries. The entrance to the Great Enclosure can be seen in our March mystery photo.

Because the structures among the ruins were built without mortar, it is believed they were intended to symbolize power and prestige rather than serve as a defense against enemies. One large conical tower is thought to have been a granary.

Eleven correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and KARYN KANDELL of Kyoto, Japan, won the drawing. We thank Fred Koehler of Orange, California, for submitting the photo. (Editor's note: Twice as many incorrect answers as correct answers were submitted this time, most of which identified the structure as Newgrange in County Meath, Ireland.)

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Lynne D'Andrea, Hanover, MA; Susan Greek, Corona, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Samuel Leon Hochman, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; WINNER:  Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; James Stefan, Sarasota, FL; Anne Tam, Honolulu, HI.
Great Enclosure, Great Zimbabwe (southeastern Zimbabwe)

Independence Monument (Phnom Penh, Cambodia)

April 2021 Issue

Independence Monument (Phnom Penh, Cambodia)


Photographed during a January 2013 cruise up the Mekong River, the Independence Monument (the structure seen in our February mystery photo) stands in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. An Angkorian-style tower, it was erected in 1958 and commemorates the country's independence from France five years earlier.

Cambodian architect Vann Molyvann designed the monument, under the direction of Prince Norodom Sihanouk. The prince wanted the monument, which resembles a lotus-shaped stupa, to combine “the religious and the secular.” During national celebrations, a ceremonial flame is often lit on a pedestal inside the monument, with flowers lining the stairs.

Nineteen correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and GEORGE C. KINGSTON of East Longmeadow, Massachusetts, won the drawing. We thank Linda Beuret of Santa Barbara, California, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Gary Atwood, Las Vegas, NV; James Bluck, Westfield, NJ; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Lee Chum, Gresham, OR; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Leslie Hosmer, Mechanicsville, MD; Bert Jeung, San Jose, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; WINNER: George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Jane Kolber, Bisbee, AZ; Don Miller, Crown Pointe, IN; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pamela Ross, Louisville, KY; Karen Wagner, Monarch Beach, CA.

March 2021 Issue

Hluboka Castle (Hluboka nad Vitavou, Czechia)


Considered one of the most beautiful castles in Czechia, Hluboká Castle was the building pictured in our January mystery photo. The architectural style of the original castle, built in the second half of the 13th century, was Gothic, but the style changed with later reconstructions.

After being expanded during the Renaissance period, the castle was rebuilt in the Baroque style in the early 18th century. During the mid-19th century, using Windsor Castle for inspiration, Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg had the castle rebuilt to resemble a Romantic Neo-Gothic château. In 1940, Germany's Gestapo seized the castle, but following World War II the government of Czechoslovakia took control of it. Now open to the public, the castle houses several art exhibits belonging to the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery.

Ten correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and MARCIA RITTER of Kirkwood, Missouri, won the drawing. We thank Donna Pyle of Boulder, Colorado, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Barbara McMahon, Williamsburg, VA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; WINNER: Marcia Ritter, Kirkwood, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.
Hluboka Castle (Hluboka nad Vitavou, Czechia)

Reconstructed Wall of Ancient Babylon (Hillah, Baghdad)

February 2021 Issue

Reconstructed Wall of Ancient Babylon (Hillah, Baghdad)


Located in what is now central Iraq, Babylon, founded in 2300 BC, was the capital of the Neo-Babylonian Empire from 626 to 539 BC. Nebuchadnezzar II, who ruled that empire at one point, is credited with ordering the construction of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Pictured in our December mystery photo is a reconstructed portion of gates of the ancient city of Babylon. The site is near Hillah, capital of Babil Governorate (Babylon Province), about 70 miles south of modern-day Baghdad.

Five correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and CATHY BRINER of Eugene, Oregon, won the drawing. We thank Laurel Glassman of Chevy Chase, Maryland, for submitting the photo.

The photographer was Michel Behar, tour leader of Laurel's group when they visited the Babylon archaeological site in November 2018.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA.