Where in the World Archives

September 2019 Issue

Sculpture of Hutton's Unconformity (The Eel)


In May 2006 in southern Scotland, a serpentine-shaped sculpture was unveiled honoring the work of the scientist James Hutton, aka “the father of geology.” Titled “The Eel,” the sculpture represents Hutton's Unconformity, the rock formation at eastern Scotland's Siccar Point that inspired Hutton's revolutionary theories about the age of the Earth.

(One of several sites so labeled, the Siccar Point site comprises folded bands of vertical 435-million-year-old graywacke (a type of sandstone) overlain “unconformably” by layers of 370-million-year-old horizontal layers of red sandstone.)

Standing in Lothian Park in the town of Jedburgh, the 40-foot-long, 9-foot-high dry-stone sculpture was made from whinstone topped with sandstone by Scottish sculptor Max Nowell.

Three correct answers were submitted naming the location shown in our July mystery photo, and CYNTHIA ANCHONDO of Moreno Valley, California, won the drawing. We thank Brita Bishop of Dallas, Texas, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

WINNER: Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan.
Sculpture of Hutton's Unconformity (The Eel)

Petrovaradin Fortress clock tower (Novi Sad, Serbia)

August 2019 Issue

Petrovaradin Fortress clock tower (Novi Sad, Serbia)


Over 300 years ago, the clock tower seen in our June 2019 “mystery photo” was created to be part of the Petrovaradin Fortress in Novi Sad, northern Serbia. On the tower, each of the four clock faces (measuring about 6½ feet in diameter) is unique in that the hour hand is long and the minute hand is short — the opposite of typical clocks. (Being able to see the hour from a distance came in handy for boatmen on the Danube River, which flows alongside the city.)

Construction of the tower spanned 88 years, from 1692 to 1780, during the reigns of several Austrian emperors. Today, the clock still operates and rings each hour.

Twenty-six correct answers were submitted, and RAYMOND PRINCE of Maple Valley, Washington, won the drawing. We thank Dave Bentzin of Casper, Wyoming, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; Dean Aulick, Silver Spring, MD; Rachel Bishar, Santa Barbara, CA; Mike Brandt, El Dorado Hills, CA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Heidi Foggatt, Phoenix, AZ; Te Gurule, Jamestown, TN; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; W. Wayne Lindsey, Las Vegas, NV; Janell Lopus, Naples, FL; Milana Naddeo, Chesterbrook, PA; Ron Oakham, Tucson, AZ; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; WINNER: Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Rod Smith, Oskaloosa, KS; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.

July 2019 Issue

Veliki Tabor Castle (Croatia)


Including elements of Late Gothic and Renaissance architecture, the structure shown in our May mystery photo is a fort that has stood atop Mt. Hum Košnički in northwestern Croatia since the mid-15th century. Known as Veliki Tabor, the fort/castle is situated nearly 1,100 feet above sea level, providing views that stretch as far as Slovenia.

In the 18th century, the fort's four towers were converted into space for housing. During World War I, Veliki Tabor served as a prison. Subsequently, it was consigned to nuns and later used as a warehouse. In the late 1980s, the whole place was revitalized, with activities held there such as falconry and knight tournaments. In 2003, a museums organization took over, with financing from the Croatian Ministry of Culture.

Ten correct answers were submitted, and MARIA CUETO of Weehawken, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Pat Minami of Brookeville, Maryland, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; WINNER: Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Margo Mata, Carlsbad, CA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.
Veliki Tabor Castle (Croatia)

Statue of Ingolfur Arnarson (Reykjavik, Iceland)

June 2019 Issue

Statue of Ingolfur Arnarson (Reykjavik, Iceland)


Recognized as one of the first permanent Norse settlers of Reykjavík, Iceland, Ingólfur Arnarson is believed to have settled on the west coast of Iceland in 874, along with his wife and foster brother. In commemoration of Ingólfur's position as one of Reykjavík's founders, a bronze statue of him — pictured in the mystery photo in our April 2019 issue — was erected in the city in 1924.

For a brief period of time, Ingólfur was the legal owner of the southwestern portion of the island. Eventually, he donated or sold much of the land to Scandinavian colonists during what has been termed the Viking Age (late 8th to mid 11th centuries).

Near the center of Reykjavik, the statue of Ingólfur is located on the knoll Arnarhóll, on the eastern end of the Old Harbour.

Twenty-eight correct answers were submitted, and E. Marlin Causey of Marietta, Georgia, won the drawing. We thank Diane Harrison of Chesterfield, Missouri, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Cynthia Anchondo, Moreno Valley, CA; WINNER: E. Marlin Causey, Marietta, GA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Steve Flexer, Gig Harbor, WA; Carla Gale, Denver, CO; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Anne Jinks, St. Clair Shores, MI; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Gert Kipnis, Tucker, GA; Thomas E. Lahmon, Anaheim, CA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Sandra L. Pelletier, Capay, CA; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Gladys Sheldon, Oconomowoc, WI; Peter Smith, Streamwood, IL; John Stern, Los Angeles, CA; Karen Swenson, South Huntington, NY; Jean Woltjer, Holland, MI.

May 2019 Issue

'Courage' monument (Brest, Belarus)


Four years after the Central Committee of the Byelorussian Communist Party gave its approval for construction to begin on the Brest Hero Fortress, the war-memorial complex was opened on Sept. 25, 1971, in Brest, Belarus. Within the complex, the main monument, “Courage,” is the statue seen in our March mystery photo.

Portraying the head of a Soviet soldier with a banner behind him, the statue (cast concrete on a steel framework and hollow inside) measures 177 feet wide by 98 feet tall. Next to it is the 328-foot-tall Bayonet-Obelisk, bearing the names of those who died during the siege of Brest Fortress, in World War II's Operation Barbarossa, during the summer of 1941.

Thirty-two correct answers were submitted, and MARY SCHMIDT of Fairfax, Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Tony Leisner of Tarpon Springs, Florida, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Ronnie Allen, Bala Cynwyd, PA; Mary Attick, Lititz, PA; Rachel Bishar, Santa Barbara, CA; Larry Brown, Las Vegas, NV; Jim Carlton, Ponca City, OK; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Tom Conner, Scottsdale, AZ; Maria Cueto, Weekawken, NJ; Sherryl Frisch, Wimauma, FL; Stanley Gorcik, Buffalo Grove, IL; Marijke Grotz, Pasadena, CA; Thomasina Gurule, Jamestown, TN; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Natallia Khoshchynka, Hallandale Beach, FL; ert Kipnis, Tucker, GA; Robert Kowalczyk, North Dartmouth, MA; William Lang, Tucson, AZ; Mel McBeth, Concord, CA; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Sandra Pelletier, Capay, CA; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; WINNER: Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Allan Singer, Rolling Hills Estates, CA; Helga Smith, New York, NY; James Stefan, Sarasota, FL; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Kathryn Witmer, Bellingham, WA.
'Courage' monument (Brest, Belarus)

Umeda Sky Building (Osaka, Japan)

April 2019 Issue

Umeda Sky Building (Osaka, Japan)


Visitors to the site pictured in our February-issue mystery photo are rewarded with a 360-degree view of Osaka, Japan, and a panorama of Osaka Bay. To get to the deck offering that view, and back down, requires a long escalator ride inside each of two (now translucent) glass-enclosed escalators inside the Umeda Sky Building.

Sitting at a height of 550 feet, the circular deck connects the two 40-story towers of the Sky Building, crossing a wide, atrium-like space. Among other attractions of the building are the rooftop Floating Garden Observatory, a gourmet market in the basement and, at the base of the towers, an urban garden featuring flowers, walking trails and a waterfall.

Japanese architect Hiroshi Hara designed the 568-foot-tall building, and construction was completed in 1993.

Thirteen correct answers were submitted, and JAMES STEFAN of Sarasota, Florida, won the drawing. ITN Editor David Tykol took the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Janet Landfried, Redlands, CA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Ron Merlo, Glendale, CA; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; David Roed, Hermosa Beach, CA; WINNER: James Stefan, Sarasota, FL; Mike Stooke, O'Fallon, IL; Lynn Tam, Waipahu, HI; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada.

March 2019 Issue

Amphitheatre of El Djem, Tunisia


Although modeled after the well-known Colosseum in Rome, the structure seen in our January mystery photo was recognized by most of those submitting answers this month as the Amphitheatre of El Djem (a town formerly called Thysdrus) in the North African country of Tunisia. The camel parked in front of the structure was a good clue.

At its widest point, the well-preserved amphitheater measures 486 feet, and at one time, the tiers of seats rose to a height of 118 feet. It is estimated that the structure was able to accommodate up to 35,000 spectators. Its construction is believed to have begun in AD 238 by order of the province's proconsul, Gordian. Built with no foundation and made entirely of stone blocks, it served as a fortress during the Middle Ages.

Sixty-four correct answers were submitted, and ARLENE BOND of Fort Worth, Texas, won the drawing. We thank Rick Sinding of Princeton, New Jersey, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Stephen Addison, Charlotte, NC; Brita Bishop, Dallas, TX; WINNER: Arlene Bond, Fort Worth, TX; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Frances Carrico, Phoenix, AZ; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Marjorie A. Clark, Lone Tree, CO; Tom Conner, Scottsdale, AZ; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Carla De Went, Grandville, MI; Marlene Dehn, Davis, CA; Christine Donchin, Ashland, OR; Steve Drosman, Encinitas, CA; Theresa Egan, Gaithersburg, MD; T. Myers Elefant, San Jose, CA; Steven Emmet, Encinitas, CA; Heidrun Foggatt, Phoenix, AZ; Deborah Futch, Winter Haven, FL; Janice Gay, Vero Beach, FL; Jean Giacchina, Grosse Pointe Park, MI; George Gianopulos, Fresno, CA; Stanley Gorcik, Buffalo Grove, IL; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; William Hollifield, Lutherville, MD; Mark & Linnea Holmer, Algona, IA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Elaine Hutchinson, Garden Ridge, TX; Robin Ilardi, Morgantown, WV; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Paul Kastin, Atlanta, GA; Sarah Kirtland, New York, NY; Joseph B. Lambert, San Antonio, TX; Deborah A. Larson, Winter Springs, FL; Alan Law, Kelowna, BC, Canada; Allan Little III, Atlanta, GA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Greg Mannion, Fountain Hills, AZ; Steven Matthews, Orleans, VT; Eleanor Minich, Albuquerque, NM; Dan Mitchell, Prior Lake, MN; Robert Mitchell, Waukesha, WI; Margaret Norman, Gurnee, IL; J.B. Oerding, Capay, CA; Kathy Parsons, Ann Arbor, MI; Carol Peim, Hendersonville, NC; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Kay Roberts, Dayton, OH; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Eileen Schattner, Alhambra, CA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Cindy Shurtleff, Seattle, WA; James P. Sibley, Spring, TX; Albert Simonson, Santa Ysabel, CA; Mike Stooke, O'Fallon, IL; Douglas Storey, Mississauga, ON, Canada; Kathy Symons, Arcadia, CA; Susan Tartaglino, Alvord, TX; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Judy Vanderstar, Waynesboro, VA; Karen Warburg, Seaside, CA.
Amphitheatre of El Djem, Tunisia

Monument of Ancient People and Pioneers of Ushaia (Argentina)

February 2019 Issue

Monument of Ancient People and Pioneers of Ushaia (Argentina)


When the design for the monument pictured in our December 2018 mystery photo was chosen from five different contest entries in May 2015, it had already been “waiting 20 years to be built,” according to the mayor of Ushuaia, Argentina. The design was that of local artist Antonino Pilello, and two years later, on June 21, 2017, the “Monument of Ancient People and Pioneers of Ushuaia” was formally inaugurated in the Civic Plaza in front of the city's port.

The white-stone sculpture depicts a mountainous island, with different historical events portrayed within the external and internal slopes, all enveloped by the head and wings of an albatross, a bird whose image is incorporated into the flag of Tierra del Fuego province.

Thirteen correct answers were submitted, and SIGNE HAUGEN of San Carlos, California, won the drawing. ITN Assistant Editor Dan Barr took the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Nicholas Anderson, Windom, MN; Linda Beuret, Santa Barbara, CA; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; WINNER: Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Walter Hinchman, Pomfret, CT; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Ann Kruse, Sammamish, WA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Mike Stooke, O'Fallon, IL; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA.

January 2019 Issue

Monument to the Wind (Puerto Natales, Chile)


“The monument blends the area's raging winds with an amazing view of distant, glacier-topped peaks and a glacial lake.” This is how the contributor of November's mystery photo described the spot where she captured this sculpture on film.

The spot is Puerto Natales, Chile, sometimes referred to as a gateway to southern Patagonia's Torres del Paine National Park, and visitors strolling along the Avenida Pedro Montt will get a close-up view of this unusual work of art, “Monumento al Viento” (“Monument to the Wind”). Designed by Chilean sculptor Marcela Romagnoli Espinosa, the national monument was inaugurated on June 1, 2012, celebrating the 101st anniversary of the founding of the city.

Thirty-one correct answers were submitted, and MARY-PAT PARKER of Colorado Springs, Colorado, won the drawing. We thank Wanda Bahde of Summerfield, Florida, for submitting the picture. We also thank Perry McIntosh of Wangulen Odyssey (a longtime ITN advertiser) for providing us with the sculptor's name.

Correct answers were submitted by:

BJ Bjorklund, Frisco, TX; Michael Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Heidi Foggatt, Phoenix, AZ; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; John Heberle, Rochester, NY; Carl Herzog, Charlotte, VT; John Hicks, Tehachapi, CA; Mike Holloway, Lumberton, NJ; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Gordon Kitchens, Atlanta, GA; Dan Lundberg, North Miami, FL; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; Hai Madarang, Kennewick, WA; Connie Martin, Prescott, AZ; Christian Moser, Puerto Natales, Chile; Cheri Ng, San Ramon, CA; WINNER: Mary-Pat Parker, Colorado Springs, CO; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Preston Reeves, Seguin, TX; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Malcolm Smith, Berkeley, CA; Phyllis Stolls, Riverside, CA; Joanne Stone, Tucson, AZ; Mike Stooke, O'Fallon, IL; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Mary Ann Wilder, Victor, NY; Kathy Wilhelm, Cary, NC.
Monument to the Wind (Puerto Natales, Chile)

Monument to Russian Navy (Moscow, Russia)

December 2018 Issue

Monument to Russian Navy (Moscow, Russia)


The 322-foot-tall statue pictured in our October 2018 mystery photo has an interesting history. Erected in 1997 in central Moscow, Russia, on a man-made island at the western confluence of the Moskva River and the Vodootvodny Canal, the statue commemorates 300 years of the Russian Navy, which was formed by Peter the Great in 1696.

Allegedly, the statue was originally intended to portray Columbus, in celebration of the 500th anniversary of his first voyage to the New World in 1492, but because there was a lack of interest for placing it at any site in America, the figure was declared to be a depiction of Peter the Great.

Zurab Tsereteli, a designer from the Caucasus country of Georgia, created the huge image using 600 tons of stainless steel, bronze and copper.

Seventy-five correct answers were submitted, and CATHY BRINER of Eugene, Oregon, won the drawing. We thank Fred Steinberg of New York, New York, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Stephen Addison, Charlotte, NC; Jack L. Alexander, Lamesa, TX; Nanci Alexander, Lexington, KY; Mary Ambrosio, Williamsburg, VA; Earl F. Ancell, San Dimas, CA; Ralph N. Barrett, Knoxville, TN; Victor Becker, Skokie, IL; Roger & Noella Benvenuti, Corona, CA; Rachel Bishar, Santa Barbara, CA; Lucyna Boyle, Mesa, AZ; WINNER: Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Tom Bulloch, Woodland Park, CO; Butch & Susie Carter, Santa Ysabel, CA; Marlin Causey, Marietta, GA; Michael Anthony Chrusciel, Riverview, MI; Marjorie A. Clark, Lone Tree, CO; Maria A. Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; Steve Daley, Sacramento, CA; Hans H. Dibbern, Santa Cruz, CA; Gena Doyscher, Minneapolis, MN; Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Janice Gay, Vero Beach, FL; Gerald Gould, Cumming, GA; Theresa Graves, Bluffton, SC; Alexander Gushansky, Encino, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Mary Hayes, Chapel Hill, NC; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Roger Jester, Tarpon Springs, FL; Andrea Jones, San Francisco, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Mary Kelly, Baton Rouge, LA; Margaret Kilgore, Sharpsburg, GA; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Sarah Kirtland, New York, NY; Janice Kolbaska, Mt. Prospect, IL; Katie Koloboff, Orinda, CA; Jason Kornmueller, Lake Forest, CA; Kathy Kostrub, Landisville, PA; Carol Lafrenaye, Yorktown, VA; Janet Landfried, Redlands, CA; Mary Lao, San Francisco, CA; Mary Latham, Dallas, TX; Joan Lenard, Oviedo, FL; John Leo, Centerville, OH; Arlene Lichtenstein, Commack, NY; Earl Mack, San Ramon, CA; L.J. Mack, Huntington Beach, CA; Greg Mannion, Fountain Hills, AZ; Mary Jane Matheny, Zolfo Springs, FL; Robert McCarron, Cuyahoga Falls, OH; Mary J. McDonald, Milwaukee, WI; Michelle Mellen, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA; Charles Moody, San Francisco, CA; Al & Emily Moore, Greenville, CA; Charlotte Moser, Ballwin, MO; Ron Oakham, Tucson, AZ; Anthony Osretkar, Frederick, MD; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Paula Prindle, Orient, OH; Marcia Ritter, St. Louis, MO; Pam Ross, Louisville, KY; Lyn Scanlon, Naples, FL; Mary Schmidt, Fairfax, VA; Rick Sinding, Princeton, NJ; John Stern, Los Angeles, CA; Mike Stooke, O'Fallon, IL; Rosalie Tabor, Carlsbad, CA; Bill Thames, St. Laurel, MS; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Denzil Verardo, Elk Grove, CA; Gail Wang, Troy, MI; Kathy Whitmer, Bellingham, WA; Laurie Young, Kalamazoo, MI.