A gîte in Brittany

By Mary Rack & Dave Fulk
This item appears on page 28 of the April 2013 issue.
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We have visited France 30-some times but until recently had stayed only in hotels, mainly family-run places in small towns. We had noticed attractive vacation cottages for rent but learned that they generally go for a week at a time and almost always Saturday p.m. to Saturday a.m.

This never quite worked for us until 2012, when everything fell into place: flights, train schedules and an available rental near sufficient history/scenery/restaurants to keep us busy for at least a week. We flew to Paris, took the TGV to Brest, rented a car and drove about an hour to our gîte near Crozon.

Gîte Kergolezec in Crozon, Brittany. Photo: Fulk

We had found the one-bedroom, ground-floor cottage in Brittany on www.gites-de-france.com and rented it from Oct. 6 to 13. It was Gîte Kergolezec. (The name of the gîte isn’t given, just its location: the commune of Crozon in the department of Finistère. Or you can contact the owner, Jean-Pierre Guéguéniat, directly; email jph.guegueniat@orange.fr.)

The owners welcomed us with local flowers, cider and cookies. They showed us around the recently renovated property and indicated where the tourist information and appliance instructions were kept, then departed with entreaties for us to call them with any questions.

Near the coast in northwest Brittany, our gîte was located on a tiny road through the residential village of Kegolezec, just outside the commune of Crozon with its shops and restaurants.

We made use of our kitchen facilities for breakfasts and light suppers but took full advantage of the area’s seafood restaurants and crêperies for other meals.

With all of the scenic and historic attractions of the Crozon peninsula less than 30 minutes away, we spent every day exploring coastal cliffs and beaches, old fishing villages, Celtic megaliths and ancient chapels.

A cove on the rugged coast of the Crozon peninsula — Brittany, France. Photo: Fulk

For our gîte, we paid €240 (near $310) for the week, about half the high-season rate. There was an additional fee of €14 for using the website to make our reservation. We had a power-usage allowance built into the rental fee and exceeded it by using the electric heat on chilly mornings, but that cost only an additional €7. There would have been a cleaning fee of €40, but we did the cleaning, ourselves, in about an hour.

Gîtes de France is an organization of independently owned holiday properties that accommodate two to 20-plus guests. Self-catering properties range from city apartments to rural houses; bed-and-breakfasts are listed as well. Most, but not all, can be rented through the website and accept credit cards. Contact information for the owner is provided.

The standard rental period for a rural gîte is Saturday afternoon to the following Saturday morning. Exceptions are possible, especially outside of high season.

Bed linens are sometimes included in the rental; otherwise, they can generally be rented. Be sure to ask about bath and kitchen towels.

Rather terrifying-looking lunch at the Hôtel de France in Camaret. Photo: Fulk

Kitchens should have sufficient dishes, utensils and pots/pans to meet basic needs. (At our gîte, we could have had a fabulous dinner party for at least six!)

Heat might not be included in the basic rental charge.

Bear in mind that most renters are budget-minded, live in France or neighboring countries and travel by car.

If you would like more information or assistance in booking a gîte, feel free to contact us at maryand dave@sbcglobal.net.

MARY RACK & DAVE FULK
Overland Park, KS

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

We have visited France 30-some times but until recently had stayed only in hotels, mainly family-run places in small towns. We had noticed attractive vacation cottages for rent but learned that they generally go for a week at a time and almost always Saturday p.m. to Saturday a.m.

This never quite worked for us until 2012, when everything fell into place: flights, train schedules and an available rental near sufficient history/scenery/restaurants to keep us busy for at least a week. We flew to Paris, took the TGV to Brest, rented a car and drove about an hour to our gîte near Crozon.

Gîte Kergolezec in Crozon, Brittany. Photo: Fulk

We had found the one-bedroom, ground-floor cottage in Brittany on www.gites-de-france.com and rented it from Oct. 6 to 13. It was Gîte Kergolezec. (The name of the gîte isn’t given, just its location: the commune of Crozon in the department of Finistère. Or you can contact the owner, Jean-Pierre Guéguéniat, directly; email jph.guegueniat@orange.fr.)

The owners welcomed us with local flowers, cider and cookies. They showed us around the recently renovated property and indicated where the tourist information and appliance instructions were kept, then departed with entreaties for us to call them with any questions.

Near the coast in northwest Brittany, our gîte was located on a tiny road through the residential village of Kegolezec, just outside the commune of Crozon with its shops and restaurants.

We made use of our kitchen facilities for breakfasts and light suppers but took full advantage of the area’s seafood restaurants and crêperies for other meals.

With all of the scenic and historic attractions of the Crozon peninsula less than 30 minutes away, we spent every day exploring coastal cliffs and beaches, old fishing villages, Celtic megaliths and ancient chapels.

A cove on the rugged coast of the Crozon peninsula — Brittany, France. Photo: Fulk

For our gîte, we paid €240 (near $310) for the week, about half the high-season rate. There was an additional fee of €14 for using the website to make our reservation. We had a power-usage allowance built into the rental fee and exceeded it by using the electric heat on chilly mornings, but that cost only an additional €7. There would have been a cleaning fee of €40, but we did the cleaning, ourselves, in about an hour.

Gîtes de France is an organization of independently owned holiday properties that accommodate two to 20-plus guests. Self-catering properties range from city apartments to rural houses; bed-and-breakfasts are listed as well. Most, but not all, can be rented through the website and accept credit cards. Contact information for the owner is provided.

The standard rental period for a rural gîte is Saturday afternoon to the following Saturday morning. Exceptions are possible, especially outside of high season.

Bed linens are sometimes included in the rental; otherwise, they can generally be rented. Be sure to ask about bath and kitchen towels.

Rather terrifying-looking lunch at the Hôtel de France in Camaret. Photo: Fulk

Kitchens should have sufficient dishes, utensils and pots/pans to meet basic needs. (At our gîte, we could have had a fabulous dinner party for at least six!)

Heat might not be included in the basic rental charge.

Bear in mind that most renters are budget-minded, live in France or neighboring countries and travel by car.

If you would like more information or assistance in booking a gîte, feel free to contact us at maryand dave@sbcglobal.net.

MARY RACK & DAVE FULK
Overland Park, KS