Labor protests in Greece

This item appears on page 21 of the November 2011 issue.
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As the unpopular austerity measures passed by the Greek government take effect in the coming months, street demonstrations and more frequent labor union strikes are likely in cities around the country. Riot police are frequently called out to contain the demonstrations, and sometimes tear gas is used.

Greece’s two main labor unions represent about 2.5 million people, about half of all workers in a country of over 11 million people. In September, strikes by the transport workers brought metro, tram, train, bus and trolley transport to a stop for several hours and created massive traffic jams. Flight delays occurred when air traffic controllers refused to work overtime.

Labor unions usually announce when strikes are planned, and the US Department of State is posting this info on the website.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

As the unpopular austerity measures passed by the Greek government take effect in the coming months, street demonstrations and more frequent labor union strikes are likely in cities around the country. Riot police are frequently called out to contain the demonstrations, and sometimes tear gas is used.

Greece’s two main labor unions represent about 2.5 million people, about half of all workers in a country of over 11 million people. In September, strikes by the transport workers brought metro, tram, train, bus and trolley transport to a stop for several hours and created massive traffic jams. Flight delays occurred when air traffic controllers refused to work overtime.

Labor unions usually announce when strikes are planned, and the US Department of State is posting this info on the website.