Libya’s transition

This item appears on page 18 of the October 2011 issue.
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Although the six-month conflict in Libya began winding down in August after the taking of Tripoli and the ouster of Gaddafi from the capital by rebel fighters, the country remains unsafe for travel. There is still sporadic violence between rebel fighters and remaining pro-Gaddafi personnel. There also are retribution attacks on civilians and some looting.

An estimated 50,000 people died or disappeared during the conflict. The National Transitional Council began the difficult work of piecing together a new government and restoring civil order.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Although the six-month conflict in Libya began winding down in August after the taking of Tripoli and the ouster of Gaddafi from the capital by rebel fighters, the country remains unsafe for travel. There is still sporadic violence between rebel fighters and remaining pro-Gaddafi personnel. There also are retribution attacks on civilians and some looting.

An estimated 50,000 people died or disappeared during the conflict. The National Transitional Council began the difficult work of piecing together a new government and restoring civil order.