South Sudan’s first steps

This item appears on page 16 of the September 2011 issue.
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On July 9, 2011, the Republic of South Sudan became the world’s newest nation. Breaking away from Sudan and forming its own government, the new country has survived civil war but faces many challenges.

Issues include resolving a bloody border dispute, settling the economics of oil (South Sudan produces it but must, by agreement, use shipping and refining infrastructures in Sudan) and battling corruption and poverty. The US Department of State warns of the risks in South Sudan and the border region between Sudan and South Sudan.

Both South Sudan AND Sudan have issued new currencies. These will have different exchange rates and may cause problems with getting cash and using credit cards.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

On July 9, 2011, the Republic of South Sudan became the world’s newest nation. Breaking away from Sudan and forming its own government, the new country has survived civil war but faces many challenges.

Issues include resolving a bloody border dispute, settling the economics of oil (South Sudan produces it but must, by agreement, use shipping and refining infrastructures in Sudan) and battling corruption and poverty. The US Department of State warns of the risks in South Sudan and the border region between Sudan and South Sudan.

Both South Sudan AND Sudan have issued new currencies. These will have different exchange rates and may cause problems with getting cash and using credit cards.