Africa

This item appears on page 20 of the June 2011 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

If you would like to read an issue from the archives that is free to nonsubscribers click here.

• In Côte d’Ivoire, forces loyal to the newly elected president, Alassane Ouattara, successfully gained control of the country and, on April 11, arrested the previous president, Laurent Gbagbo. Although the situation has calmed since Mr. Gbagbo’s arrest, law and order has yet to return to all of Abidjan’s neighborhoods. Food shortages and the banking crisis are potential problems

• As Sudan prepares to split into two countries in July, fighting continues over the soon-to-be north/south border region in the Nuba Mountains.

• In Uganda, protests over food prices in the capital of Kampala have increased in frequency and violence. Travelers are urged to avoid any demonstrations and not to travel at night.

• In Nigeria, tens of thousands of people fled their homes and as many as 500 people may have been killed in April due to riots and violence following the election of President Goodluck Jonathan.

The US Department of State warns of the risks of travel to much of Nigeria because of the risks of kidnapping, robbery and other armed attacks by individuals and gangs as well as by persons wearing police and military uniforms, especially at night. Since January 2009, more than 140 foreign nationals have been kidnapped in Nigeria, including five US citizens since November 2010. Home invasions remain a serious threat

There are regular reports of piracy off the coast of Nigeria in the Gulf of Guinea.

• In Ouagadougou and several other cities throughout Burkina Faso, including Fada N’Gourma and Tenkodogo, mutineering soldiers have protested violently, looted and committed carjackings.

In Ouagadougou, April 14-16, heavily armed individuals in military and civilian clothing fired weapons and attacked residences of several government officials, robbed private homes, raided numerous hotels and forcibly seized vehicles (most of which were recovered with minimal damage).

On April 16, protesting civilians destroyed some government and private buildings and property. From April 16 to 18, there was renewed violence from mutineering soldiers in a few other cities.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

• In Côte d’Ivoire, forces loyal to the newly elected president, Alassane Ouattara, successfully gained control of the country and, on April 11, arrested the previous president, Laurent Gbagbo. Although the situation has calmed since Mr. Gbagbo’s arrest, law and order has yet to return to all of Abidjan’s neighborhoods. Food shortages and the banking crisis are potential problems

• As Sudan prepares to split into two countries in July, fighting continues over the soon-to-be north/south border region in the Nuba Mountains.

• In Uganda, protests over food prices in the capital of Kampala have increased in frequency and violence. Travelers are urged to avoid any demonstrations and not to travel at night.

• In Nigeria, tens of thousands of people fled their homes and as many as 500 people may have been killed in April due to riots and violence following the election of President Goodluck Jonathan.

The US Department of State warns of the risks of travel to much of Nigeria because of the risks of kidnapping, robbery and other armed attacks by individuals and gangs as well as by persons wearing police and military uniforms, especially at night. Since January 2009, more than 140 foreign nationals have been kidnapped in Nigeria, including five US citizens since November 2010. Home invasions remain a serious threat

There are regular reports of piracy off the coast of Nigeria in the Gulf of Guinea.

• In Ouagadougou and several other cities throughout Burkina Faso, including Fada N’Gourma and Tenkodogo, mutineering soldiers have protested violently, looted and committed carjackings.

In Ouagadougou, April 14-16, heavily armed individuals in military and civilian clothing fired weapons and attacked residences of several government officials, robbed private homes, raided numerous hotels and forcibly seized vehicles (most of which were recovered with minimal damage).

On April 16, protesting civilians destroyed some government and private buildings and property. From April 16 to 18, there was renewed violence from mutineering soldiers in a few other cities.