Sudan tensions rising

This item appears on page 67 of the May 2011 issue.
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As southern Sudan prepares for the July 9 secession date that will split the country into North Sudan and South Sudan, the threat of violence has increased.

In March, both the north and south sent armed forces to the central border region of Abyei, both sides having claimed this region during the civil war that lasted five years. A UN peacekeeping force of 10,000 is helping enforce the 2005 cease-fire, but tensions have increased as struggles over oil revenue and border towns continue.

In Darfur (the western region of northern Sudan), the conflict between armed militia groups continues.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

As southern Sudan prepares for the July 9 secession date that will split the country into North Sudan and South Sudan, the threat of violence has increased.

In March, both the north and south sent armed forces to the central border region of Abyei, both sides having claimed this region during the civil war that lasted five years. A UN peacekeeping force of 10,000 is helping enforce the 2005 cease-fire, but tensions have increased as struggles over oil revenue and border towns continue.

In Darfur (the western region of northern Sudan), the conflict between armed militia groups continues.