Madagascar instability

This item appears on page 19 of the February 2011 issue.
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In March 2009, with the military’s backing, Andry Rajoelina toppled the elected president of Madagascar. On Nov. 17 in a controversial vote, Madagascar citizens approved a new constitution, one which could keep Rajoelina in power indefinitely. Midway through voting day, a group of mutinous officers tried to seize power; the rebel officers were captured four days later.

Courts approved the new constitution, and the government scheduled parliamentary elections for March 2011 and presidential elections for May. Political demonstrations are probable during those months.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In March 2009, with the military’s backing, Andry Rajoelina toppled the elected president of Madagascar. On Nov. 17 in a controversial vote, Madagascar citizens approved a new constitution, one which could keep Rajoelina in power indefinitely. Midway through voting day, a group of mutinous officers tried to seize power; the rebel officers were captured four days later.

Courts approved the new constitution, and the government scheduled parliamentary elections for March 2011 and presidential elections for May. Political demonstrations are probable during those months.