Where in the World Archives

'Beehive' houses in Harran, Turkey

February 2012 Issue

'Beehive' houses in Harran, Turkey


The “beehive” houses in Harran in the southeastern Anatolian region of Turkey

What’s made of mud, stays cool in the hottest weather and boasts a design that hasn’t changed in 3,000 years?

The subject of December’s photo, the “beehive” houses in Harran in the southeastern Anatolian region of Turkey, located very near the border with Syria.

Since the Assyrians first built them, people lived in houses like this in Harran until the 1980s; today, they remain as tourist exhibits.

Thirty-one readers sent in the correct answer, and GORDON STOFF of Venice, Florida, won the drawing.

We thank Michele Burgess of Huntington Beach, California, for contributing the photo.

January 2012 Issue

Island of Hvar, in Adriatic Sea off Dalmatian coast of Croatia


The island of Hvar, in the Adriatic Sea off the Dalmatian coast of Croatia

“When I think of our day on Hvar, I am reminded of the smell of lavender,” wrote BONNIE FLOYD of Sacramento, California, the winner of this month’s drawing. She, along with many of the twenty-eight other readers who sent in correct answers, had been to the subject of November’s photo, the island of Hvar, in the Adriatic Sea off the Dalmatian coast of Croatia.

The photo shows the view from a high point of Hvar city, overlooking the many small islands off Hvar’s coast.

Lavender, grown for perfume, is one of many crops that grow in Hvar’s mild and fertile climate.

Hvar is a two-hour ferry ride from the city of Split, Croatia, and is a favorite destination for travelers to the region.

We thank Helen Weismeyer of Port Ludlow, Washington, for contributing the photo.
Island of Hvar, in Adriatic Sea off Dalmatian coast of Croatia

"Gateway," a 75-foot-high monument in New Zealand

December 2011 Issue

"Gateway," a 75-foot-high monument in New Zealand


Gateway, a 75-foot-high monument in New Zealand.

New Zealand artist Chris Booth built “Gateway,” the 75-foot-high monument that’s the subject of October’s photo, between 1986 and 1990. Since then, the two columns of rock, “joined” by an arch of water, have stood sentinel at one of the entrances of Albert Park in central Auckland, New Zealand.

One art critic said that Booth “creates memorable works that sit respectfully in the landscape.”

Two readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and BETH POWELL of Eureka, California, won the drawing. We thank Sharon VanDewark of San Diego, California, for contributing the photo.

November 2011 Issue

Museo de Arte Comtemporãnea de Niterói (MAC) in Niterói, Brazil


The Museo de Arte Comtemporãnea de Niterói (MAC) in Niterói, Brazil

Any fan of science fiction, “The Jetsons” or just whimsical design might like to check out the article on architect Oscar Niemeyer on Wikipedia, to see photos of some of his amazing buildings.

In 1996, at age 89, Niemeyer designed the subject of September’s photo, the Museo de Arte Comtemporãnea de Niterói (MAC) in Niterói, Brazil (across the bay from Rio de Janeiro). The flying-saucer-shaped building is one of many futuristic, playful creations by the prize-winning architect, who is to celebrate his 104th birthday on Dec. 15, 2011.

Thirty-five readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and RUTH-ELLEN DANZ of Wilmette, Illinois, won the drawing. We thank Thom Wilson of Scottsdale, Arizona, for contributing the photo.
Museo de Arte Comtemporãnea de Niterói (MAC) in Niterói, Brazil

Liebfraukirche in Trier, Germany

October 2011 Issue

Liebfraukirche in Trier, Germany


The Liebfraukirche in Trier, Germany

August’s photo depicts the entrance to the Liebfraukirche in Trier, Germany.

Completed in 1260, it is one of the oldest Gothic churches in Germany. (The other contender for the title of “oldest Gothic church” is in Marburg.)

Twelve is the number that dominates the interior of the church. The floor plan resembles a 12-petaled rose, the Mystic Rose that is one of the symbols for the Virgin Mary. On 12 columns, the 12 apostles are painted along with the 12 articles of the Apostle’s Creed.

The 12 tribes of Israel are also symbolized in the church.

Alas, not 12 but only three readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and JIM and LINDA McLELLAN of The Woodlands, Texas, won the drawing.

ITN’s Jane Albusche contributed the photo.

September 2011 Issue

Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco


Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco
Most every reader who sent in an answer this month had one comment: this place stinks! (Literally.)

July’s photo depicts the Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco. Barbara McIntosh of Roseville, California, who contributed the photo, wrote, “The tannery has been in use since medieval times. With the natural dyes in reds, yellows and blues, the mud-brick vats are beautiful.

Hides from sheep, goats, cows and camels are first treated in the white vats, which are filled with a solution of pigeon droppings and lime to remove the hair. Next, barefoot workers dye the skins. An adjoining shop sells leather goods, from handbags to bacouches (colorful slippers).”

This was a popular one. We had 295 correct answers, and JOAN OFFERLE of Austin, Texas, won the drawing.
Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco

"Mount Sumeru," a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife

August 2011 Issue

"Mount Sumeru," a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife


“Mount Sumeru,” is a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife.

Not a lot of room at the top! The piece shown in June’s photo, “Mount Sumeru,” is a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife.

The 1.5-meter-high, bronze, Ming Dynasty statue stands in front of the Yonghegong (Hall of Harmony and Peace), one of the five halls comprising the Yonghe Temple (aka the Lama Temple) in Beijing, China.

As legend has it, at the very top of Mount Sumeru is paradise, where those who have achieved nirvana dwell.

Beneath that are the realms for mankind and the heavenly kings, while at the bottom, below the sea waves, “evil spirits, devils and criminals abide in hell.”

One reader sent in the correct answer by the deadline, so JOE ROBERSON of Opelika, Alabama, is the winner. We thank Dave Bruels of Seattle, Washington, for contributing the photo.

July 2011 Issue

Statue outside Museu da Indústria Baleeira, Portugal


The statue of a whaler outside the Museu da Indústria Baleeira in São Roque, Pico, Azores, Portugal

Thar she blows! May’s photo depicts the statue of a whaler, in his tiny craft, outside the Museu da Indústria Baleeira in São Roque, Pico, Azores, Portugal.

In 1979, Portugal outlawed whaling and turned the waters around the Azores into a natural refuge. Today, visitors can go whale-watching and peaceably observe a plethora of cetacean species, including sperm whales, blue whales, fin whales, orcas and many varieties of dolphins.

Fourteen readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline, and BEVERLY CONGLETON of Lehigh Acres, Florida, won the drawing. We thank John and Jean Frazier of Scarborough, Maine, for sending the photo.
Statue outside Museu da Indústria Baleeira, Portugal

Huashan (Flowery Mountain), located just outside Xi’an, China

June 2011 Issue

Huashan (Flowery Mountain), located just outside Xi’an, China


Huashan (Flowery Mountain) is located just outside of Xi’an, China, in Shaanxi Province.

When climbing the “Stairway to Heaven,” watch your step. In fact, the climb up the side of Huashan, the sacred mountain pictured in April’s photo, is so precipitous that signs read “No watching when walking. When walking, no watching” (suggesting that you stop climbing before taking your eyes off the path to enjoy the view).

Located just outside of Xi’an, China, in Shaanxi Province, Huashan (Flowery Mountain) has had a climbing path to its peak since, at least, the third century AD.

Today, you can climb the 5,295 feet of paths and stairways to the temples at the top or take a cable car partway and climb the rest.

Seven readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline and SUBHADRA SURESH of Cincinnati, Ohio, won the drawing. We thank Dave Bruels of Seattle, Washington, for contributing the photo.

May 2011 Issue

Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka


The sun never sets on the (former) British Empire. March’s photo depicts the very Anglican-looking Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, located in Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka.
The very Anglican-looking Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, located in Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka

Although Sri Lanka achieved its independence in 1948, there remain many hints of its colonial past, such as this church, built in 1899 by tea growers. The gravestones bear the English names of the plantation owners and their families.

Four excellent guesses were sent in, but no correct answers were received by the deadline. DAVID PATTEN of Saint Petersburg, Florida, who sent us the photo, wins the prize for stumping the readers.
Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka