Where in the World Archives

March 2013 Issue

Split Apple Rock, South Island, New Zealand


Split Apple Rock, just off of Kaiteriteri Beach in Abel Tasman National Park, South Island, New Zealand
Two gods of Maori legend were fighting over the possession of a large boulder. To settle the matter, they used their godlike strength to break it in half. That’s the origin story of the subject of January’s photo, Split Apple Rock, just off of Kaiteriteri Beach in Abel Tasman National Park, South Island, New Zealand.

(An alternate theory, suggested by geologists, is that water seeped into a crack in the rock during an ice age and froze, expanding in volume and splitting the stone. But that’s not as much fun, is it?).

Fifty-six readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and FRED LOKAY of Williamsburg, Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Rosemary McDaniel of Trenton, Florida, for sending in the photo.
Split Apple Rock, South Island, New Zealand

Tvindefossen, a waterfall north of Voss, Norway

February 2013 Issue

Tvindefossen, a waterfall north of Voss, Norway




Why do more than 200,000 people every year visit the subject of December’s photo, Tvindefossen, a waterfall 12 kilometers north of Voss, Norway? Perhaps because the 379-foot-high fall, which cascades over 10 tiers of rock, is easily accessible and highly photogenic.

Or it could be because a sip of the fall’s water is reputed to confer long life and success in love. (We won’t speculate that the local Chamber of Commerce might have started those rumors....)

Twenty-three readers sent in correct answers, and RICHARD WELCH of Annandale, Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Carolyn Casperson of Banning, California, for contributing the photo.

January 2013 Issue

El Palau de les Arts (Palace of the Arts) Reina Sofia in Valencia, Spain


El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia

The location of the subject of November’s photo is in Valencia, Spain.

In what was once part of the Turia riverbed, the city fathers built a park. Starting in 1996, the park became the site of The City of Arts and Sciences, a complex of buildings dedicated to the pursuit of entertainment and culture. November’s photo depicts the most recent addition to the complex, El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia, a center for opera and other performing arts.

Forty-seven readers sent in correct answers, and JOE D. ROBERSON of Opelika, Alabama, won the drawing. We thank Judy Spielman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for sending in the photo.
El Palau de les Arts (Palace of the Arts) Reina Sofia in Valencia, Spain

Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park

December 2012 Issue

Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park


The Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park

“. . . and let it begin with me.”

Installed in 1955, the subject of October’s photo is the Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park.

Nagasaki native son Seibo Kitamura created the 32-foot bronze, whose right arm points upward toward the threat of nuclear destruction while the left arm is extended in a gesture of peace. His eyes are closed in prayer for the dead, but his muscular figure symbolizes the strength needed by the living to keep the dream of peace alive.

Fifty-two readers sent in correct answers, and TOM LAHMON of Anaheim, California, won the drawing. We thank Stanley and Thomasine Elefant of San Jose, California, for contributing the photo.

November 2012 Issue

17th-century palace in Gondar, Ethiopia


One of the 17th-century palaces in Gondar, Ethiopia

The subject of September’s photo can be found within the city of Gondar in Ethiopia. It is one of the 17th-century palaces in the Royal Enclosure.

For centuries, Ethiopian royalty was nomadic, living in tents and moving from place to place. In 1635, Emperor Fasiledes established Gondar as Ethiopia’s capital city, which it remained until 1855. Today, what's left of many of the royal palaces, churches and other buildings lie surrounded by the modern city.

Six readers sent in correct answers, and RICHARD WALKER of La Jolla, California, won the drawing. We thank Betty Serow of Tallahassee, Florida, for sending in the photo.
17th-century palace in Gondar, Ethiopia

St. George by Catalan artist Josep Maria Subarichs

October 2012 Issue

St. George by Catalan artist Josep Maria Subarichs


Pilgrims have been making the trek up Our Lady’s Hill to the Shrine in Montserrat, Spain, for centuries, but it wasn’t until 1986 that the subject of August’s photo was installed near the top of the path.

It’s a sculpture of St. George by Catalan artist Josep Maria Subarichs (b. 1927). Subarichs is best known for carving the Passion Façade at Sagrada Família cathedral in Barcelona.

Five readers sent in correct answers, and LYNN SIMS of Springfield, Missouri, won the drawing.

We thank Phyllis Mueller of San Jose, California, for contributing the photo.

September 2012 Issue

“Crocodile Rock” on the Isle of Cumbrae, Scotland


The subject of July’s photo is the “Crocodile Rock,” one of the painted rocks on the Isle of Cumbrae, off the coast of North Ayrshire, Scotland. The croc, in Cumbrae’s only town, Millport, is not far from the pub which its creator, retired architect Robert Brown, had just visited on the day in 1913 when he decided to paint this cheerful reptile. The paint has been touched up over the years, but Brown’s original design remains intact.

Seven readers sent in the correct answer, and DAVID E. IRVING of Media, Pennsylvania, won the drawing. He added this note: “My mother emigrated to the US from Scotland. She showed me a 1944 photo snapped of her as an 8-year-old on holiday on Cumbrae in front of a funny painted rock. I forgot all about it. Sixty years later, as a travel agent, I was in Glasgow and had a free day. I took the ferry to Millport, rented a bike and, out of nowhere, came across the rock. With tears in my eyes, I asked a local to photograph me where my mother had once stood.”

We thank Janet Brenneman of Billings, Montana, for sending in the photo taken by her husband, Jim Kyle.
“Crocodile Rock” on the Isle of Cumbrae, Scotland

Invercargill Water Tower

August 2012 Issue

Invercargill Water Tower


Tanks for the memories.... When 19th-century Europeans began developing Invercargill, South Island, New Zealand, they faced the problem of supplying water to the new settlement. The area around Invercargill is very flat, so they couldn’t rely on a gravity-fed system. The solution is the subject of the June 2012 photo: the Invercargill Water Tower.

Built in 1889, the 131-foot-high tower is topped with a water tank that holds 78,459 gallons. The ornate red-brick-and-plaster cupola around the tower is considered to be a prime example of the Victorian style of decorating utilitarian structures.

Visitors used to be able to tour the inside of the tower, but as of February ’12 the tower has been closed, awaiting clearance by earthquake-safety inspectors.

Three readers sent in correct answers, and GEORGE KINGSTON of East Longmeadow, Massachusetts, won the drawing. We thank Nanci Alexander of Lexington, Kentucky, for contributing the photo.

July 2012 Issue

Jantar Mantar observatory in Jaipur



Maharajah Jai Singh II really wanted to keep track of all things heavenly. The site of May’s photo, the Jantar Mantar observatory in Jaipur, India, is one of five astronomical facilities which he had built during his reign, 1699-1743.

Jantar mantar means “calculation instrument,” and May’s photo depicts one of the 14 stone-and-marble devices that used geometry in astronomical observations. It is the Narivalaya Yantra, an equatorial sundial.

Sixty-eight readers sent in correct answers, and SUSAN ROSENZWEIG of Owings Mills, Maryland, won the drawing. We thank Marilyn Santiago of Port Angeles, Washington, for contributing the photo.
Jantar Mantar observatory in Jaipur

Alyosha, granite monument on Russia's Litsa River

June 2012 Issue

Alyosha, granite monument on Russia's Litsa River



For four years, from 1941 to 1944, the Litsa River frontier in the Russian Arctic was the focus of an attempt by German forces to take Murmansk, site of a harbor crucial to the Soviets. Tens of thousands of men on both sides died during the battle. Although Murmansk, itself, was bombed into ruins, no Axis forces ever succeeded in setting foot in the city.

October 19, 1974, was the 30th anniversary of the final defeat of the German forces in the Arctic, and the subject of April’s photo was dedicated on that day in a solemn ceremony. “Defenders of the Soviet Arctic during the Great Patriotic War,” aka Alyosha (a diminutive of "Aleksey"), is a 116-foot-tall granite monument standing on a 23-foot-high pedestal.

Alyosha faces west toward what during the war was known as “Death Valley” but what today is called “Valley of Glory.” The statue weighs 5,000 tons and is hollow, but, to the Russians, the victory certainly was not.

Fifteen readers sent in the correct answer, and BRENDA DOHERTY of Clifton, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Susan Darsey of La Selva Beach, California, for contributing the photo.