Where in the World Archives

The O2, aka the Millennium Dome

June 2013 Issue

The O2, aka the Millennium Dome


The O2, aka the Millennium Dome

Can you walk on air? Well, in London, England, the site of April’s photo, you can walk on O2. The photo shows the top of The O2, aka the Millennium Dome, built in 1999 to house an exhibit to celebrate the third millennium, then sold, refurbished and renamed to be the center of a complex of entertainment venues.

Located in the North Greenwich district, The O2 houses a concert arena, a cinema complex, a dance club, an exhibit space and much more. Or you can walk across the dome’s roof and take in the view from 196 feet up; visit www.theo2.co.uk.

Eighteen readers sent in correct answers, and MARY O’DONNELL of Wilton Manors, Florida, won the drawing. We thank Judy Spielman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were sent in by:

Stephen O. Addison, Jr. & Paula Owens, Charlotte, NC; Steven Beningo, Derwood, MD; Richard & Joan Blacharski, Cumming, GA; Philip L. Cosgrove, Houston, TX; Richard Felak, Niskayuna, NY; John Gleason, Bossier City, LA; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; WINNER: Mary O’Donnell, Wilton Manors, FL; R.A. McQueen, Florence, SC; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Joe D. Roberson, Opelika, AL; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Brian Weaver, Burlington, KY; Richard Welch, Annandale, VA; Kathy Wilhelm, Cary, NC, and Marj Wright, Marlboro, VT.

May 2013 Issue

Shlisselburg Fortress, Russia


Shlisselburg Fortress

The subject of March’s photo is Shlisselburg Fortress, located by Lake Ladoga near the head of the Neva River in northwestern Russia.

There’s been a fortification on the site of Shlisselburg for 800 years. Possession of the site ping-ponged between Sweden and the Novogorod Republic for centuries until Peter the Great of Russia “won” the battle for it in 1702. (Russia lost 6,000 men and Sweden, 110, but Russia got the fortress.) Today Shlissleburg is home to the Museum of Political Prisoners of the Russian Empire.

Four readers sent in the correct answer, and MAUREEN PATRICK of Margate, Florida, won the drawing. We thank Wanda Bahde of Summerfield, Florida, for sending in the photo.
Shlisselburg Fortress, Russia

Pablo Picasso sculpture on Lake Vänern near Kristinehamn, Sweden

April 2013 Issue

Pablo Picasso sculpture on Lake Vänern near Kristinehamn, Sweden


The location of the subject in February’s photo is the shore of Lake Vänern near Kristinehamn, Sweden. Pictured is a 15-meter-tall sculpture imagined by Pablo Picasso and built by Norwegian artist Carl Nejsar in 1965. Its steel frame was filled with small stones and concrete, and the exterior patterns then were created through sand blasting. The sculpture is a portrait of Picasso’s wife, Jacqueline. (From another angle, the sculpture resembles a face in profile.)

Five readers sent in the correct answer, and RICHARD SUNDEEN of Manhattan Beach, California, won the drawing.

We thank Carole Jacobs of Golden, Colorado, for contributing the photo.

March 2013 Issue

Split Apple Rock, South Island, New Zealand


Split Apple Rock, just off of Kaiteriteri Beach in Abel Tasman National Park, South Island, New Zealand
Two gods of Maori legend were fighting over the possession of a large boulder. To settle the matter, they used their godlike strength to break it in half. That’s the origin story of the subject of January’s photo, Split Apple Rock, just off of Kaiteriteri Beach in Abel Tasman National Park, South Island, New Zealand.

(An alternate theory, suggested by geologists, is that water seeped into a crack in the rock during an ice age and froze, expanding in volume and splitting the stone. But that’s not as much fun, is it?).

Fifty-six readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and FRED LOKAY of Williamsburg, Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Rosemary McDaniel of Trenton, Florida, for sending in the photo.
Split Apple Rock, South Island, New Zealand

Tvindefossen, a waterfall north of Voss, Norway

February 2013 Issue

Tvindefossen, a waterfall north of Voss, Norway




Why do more than 200,000 people every year visit the subject of December’s photo, Tvindefossen, a waterfall 12 kilometers north of Voss, Norway? Perhaps because the 379-foot-high fall, which cascades over 10 tiers of rock, is easily accessible and highly photogenic.

Or it could be because a sip of the fall’s water is reputed to confer long life and success in love. (We won’t speculate that the local Chamber of Commerce might have started those rumors....)

Twenty-three readers sent in correct answers, and RICHARD WELCH of Annandale, Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Carolyn Casperson of Banning, California, for contributing the photo.

January 2013 Issue

El Palau de les Arts (Palace of the Arts) Reina Sofia in Valencia, Spain


El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia

The location of the subject of November’s photo is in Valencia, Spain.

In what was once part of the Turia riverbed, the city fathers built a park. Starting in 1996, the park became the site of The City of Arts and Sciences, a complex of buildings dedicated to the pursuit of entertainment and culture. November’s photo depicts the most recent addition to the complex, El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia, a center for opera and other performing arts.

Forty-seven readers sent in correct answers, and JOE D. ROBERSON of Opelika, Alabama, won the drawing. We thank Judy Spielman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for sending in the photo.
El Palau de les Arts (Palace of the Arts) Reina Sofia in Valencia, Spain

Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park

December 2012 Issue

Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park


The Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park

“. . . and let it begin with me.”

Installed in 1955, the subject of October’s photo is the Peace Statue in Nagasaki, Japan’s, Peace Park.

Nagasaki native son Seibo Kitamura created the 32-foot bronze, whose right arm points upward toward the threat of nuclear destruction while the left arm is extended in a gesture of peace. His eyes are closed in prayer for the dead, but his muscular figure symbolizes the strength needed by the living to keep the dream of peace alive.

Fifty-two readers sent in correct answers, and TOM LAHMON of Anaheim, California, won the drawing. We thank Stanley and Thomasine Elefant of San Jose, California, for contributing the photo.

November 2012 Issue

17th-century palace in Gondar, Ethiopia


One of the 17th-century palaces in Gondar, Ethiopia

The subject of September’s photo can be found within the city of Gondar in Ethiopia. It is one of the 17th-century palaces in the Royal Enclosure.

For centuries, Ethiopian royalty was nomadic, living in tents and moving from place to place. In 1635, Emperor Fasiledes established Gondar as Ethiopia’s capital city, which it remained until 1855. Today, what's left of many of the royal palaces, churches and other buildings lie surrounded by the modern city.

Six readers sent in correct answers, and RICHARD WALKER of La Jolla, California, won the drawing. We thank Betty Serow of Tallahassee, Florida, for sending in the photo.
17th-century palace in Gondar, Ethiopia

St. George by Catalan artist Josep Maria Subarichs

October 2012 Issue

St. George by Catalan artist Josep Maria Subarichs


Pilgrims have been making the trek up Our Lady’s Hill to the Shrine in Montserrat, Spain, for centuries, but it wasn’t until 1986 that the subject of August’s photo was installed near the top of the path.

It’s a sculpture of St. George by Catalan artist Josep Maria Subarichs (b. 1927). Subarichs is best known for carving the Passion Façade at Sagrada Família cathedral in Barcelona.

Five readers sent in correct answers, and LYNN SIMS of Springfield, Missouri, won the drawing.

We thank Phyllis Mueller of San Jose, California, for contributing the photo.

September 2012 Issue

“Crocodile Rock” on the Isle of Cumbrae, Scotland


The subject of July’s photo is the “Crocodile Rock,” one of the painted rocks on the Isle of Cumbrae, off the coast of North Ayrshire, Scotland. The croc, in Cumbrae’s only town, Millport, is not far from the pub which its creator, retired architect Robert Brown, had just visited on the day in 1913 when he decided to paint this cheerful reptile. The paint has been touched up over the years, but Brown’s original design remains intact.

Seven readers sent in the correct answer, and DAVID E. IRVING of Media, Pennsylvania, won the drawing. He added this note: “My mother emigrated to the US from Scotland. She showed me a 1944 photo snapped of her as an 8-year-old on holiday on Cumbrae in front of a funny painted rock. I forgot all about it. Sixty years later, as a travel agent, I was in Glasgow and had a free day. I took the ferry to Millport, rented a bike and, out of nowhere, came across the rock. With tears in my eyes, I asked a local to photograph me where my mother had once stood.”

We thank Janet Brenneman of Billings, Montana, for sending in the photo taken by her husband, Jim Kyle.
“Crocodile Rock” on the Isle of Cumbrae, Scotland