Where in the World Archives

July 2014 Issue

Curvilinear Range, Irish National Botanic Gardens, in Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland


The mystery photo in the May 2014 issue was taken in the Irish National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin, a neighborhood in the Northside area of Dublin, Ireland. The row of greenhouses is part of a structure called the Curvilinear Range.

Most of those who submitted guesses, however, thought the picture was taken at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, England. There's no mystery why the structures are similar. Dublin-born ironmaster Richard Turner, who designed the Curvilinear Range, was also involved with the design and construction of the Victorian-style Palm Houses at Kew Gardens and in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

In the Glasnevin gardens (where admission is free), the oldest part of the Curvilinear Range is the East Wing, built in 1843. The remaining sections of the building were completed in 1869, when the size of each of the two extreme wings was doubled. Renovations done in 1995 used the structure’s original wrought iron.

Built between 1844 and 1848, the Victorian-style Palm House in London's Kew Gardens is 30 feet longer than Glasnevin’s Curvilinear Range, and, at its highest point, 32 feet taller than the central dome in Glasnevin’s row of greenhouses.

MARIANNE AYRES of Tucson, Arizona, provided the only correct answer. We thank Diane Harrison of Chesterfield, Missouri, for contributing the photo. Diane told ITN that she’s been to Kew Gardens as well and thinks the greenhouses at Glasnevin are more beautiful.
Curvilinear Range, Irish National Botanic Gardens, in Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland

Manaca-Iznaga Tower, Cuba

June 2014 Issue

Manaca-Iznaga Tower, Cuba


Manaca-Iznaga Tower

Looking down from the top of Manaca-Iznaga Tower over the Valle de Los Ingenios (Valley of the Sugar Mills), a UNESCO World Heritage Site in central Cuba, is an experience that was limited to only a few privileged individuals a couple of centuries ago.

Pictured in the April 2014 issue, the tower was built in 1816 by Alejo Maria Iznaga y Borrell, a plantation owner who wanted to make sure others recognized his power and wealth. The bell that hung in the tower announced the start and end of each workday for slaves working in the sugar mills and plantations, but it also sounded an alarm should any of them escape. At one time, more than 30,000 slaves worked in cane sugar mills throughout the three valleys.

A 184-step stairway in the center of the 147-foot tower, 12 kilometers northwest of the town of Trinidad, takes visitors all the way to the top. Divided into seven levels of different geometric shapes, the tower is made of mud bricks and a mortar of lime and sand.

Five correct answers were submitted, and JOYCE RENEE LEWIS of Camano Island, Washington, won the drawing. We thank Diana Butler of El Sobrante, California, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

T.M. Elefant, San Jose, CA; Wendlandt Hasselle, Tunica, MS; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; WINNER: Joyce Renee Lewis, Camano Island, WA; Mark A. Varnau, Indianapolis, IN.

May 2014 Issue

Falkirk Wheel, Scotland


Just west of the town of Falkirk in central Scotland is where you’ll see the unusual structure shown in the photo in the March 2014 issue. The Falkirk Wheel is the only rotating boat lift in the world. It connects the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal near Falkirk, transporting narrowboats 115 feet between the different levels of water.
Falkirk Wheel

When the lift opened in 2002, it was the first time the two canals had been connected since the 1930s, when the locks were dismantled after the canals fell into disuse. Located halfway between Edinburgh and Glasgow, the lift also reopened the water route between the two cities. Prior to 1933, boats traveled through a series of 11 locks between the canals.

Actually, the picture shows the aqueduct that connects the Union Canal to the Falkirk Wheel’s upper gondola. (Karl Snepp of Redmond, WA, and the Lathens of Occidental, CA — who were among those who guessed correctly — pointed this out.)

Twenty-three correct answers were submitted, and MARIE T. MURR of Mooresville, NC, won the drawing. We thank Judy Spielman of Philadelphia, PA, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Stephen O. Addison, Jr., Charlotte, NC; Thomas Beam, Great Falls, MT; Jerry Coleman, Sebastopol, CA; Jan Foster, Seattle, WA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jeffrey Henn, Tinton Falls, NJ; Allan Hodgson, Lakeway, TX; Lee Lamond, North Wales, PA; Sue Larson, Mountain View, CA; Melanie & Gary Lathen, Occidental, CA; Nancy A. Logan, Jamestown, RI; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Cynthia E. Lyle, San Antonio, TX; Alexander McDonald, Dana Point, CA; WINNER: Marie T. Murr, Mooresville, NC; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Donna Pyle, Boulder, CO; David Riegert, Reno, NV; Karl Snepp, Redmond, WA; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Robert P. Townley, Columbia, CA; Dr. Joseph Whitehouse, Oakland, CA; Janet D. Sheridan & DeWitt (Dee) Whittington, Richmond, VA.
Falkirk Wheel, Scotland

Defenders of the Soviet Arctic

April 2014 Issue

Defenders of the Soviet Arctic


If the February “Where in the World?” photo looked familiar, it’s because a picture of the same monument was printed in this space in the April '12 issue. This time, however, you got to see the FRONT of the statue.
Alyosha

The massive monument “Defenders of the Soviet Arctic during the Great Patriotic War,” also known as Alyosha, stands in Murmansk, northwestern Russia, honoring the Soviet soldiers, sailors and airmen who defended their homeland against the Germans during World War II. In October of this year, it will have been 40 years since Alyosha was erected.

Thirty-three correct answers were submitted, and JOHN KIRCHGESNER of Demarest, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Pete Gandell of San Francisco, California, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Irina, Ontario, Canada; Patricia Bunyard, Cambria, CA; Janice Buxton, Huntington Beach, CA; Ron Dahl, Balboa, CA; Susan Darsey, La Selva Beach, CA; Tom & Linda DeChaine, Penn Valley, CA; Marilyn Drews, San Mateo, CA; Nan Hampton, Austin, TX; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Leslie Jones, Oakland, CA; KR Kennedy, Portland, OR; WINNER: John Kirchgesner, Demarest, NJ; Lee Lamond, North Wales, PA; Sue Larson, Mountain View, CA; Kenneth Levine, Greenbelt, MD; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Sandra Lydahl, Temple, TX; Carol Ann Nulk, San Jose, CA; Anthony Osretkar, Frederick, MD; Sally Otto, Dunedin, FL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; John Reading, Brookline, MA; Gerry Rollefson, St. Michaels, MD; Lorenz Rychner, Denver, CO; Mona Sage, Ponca City, OK; Barbara Skelly, Oakland, CA; Michael Tolle, Menlo Park, CA; Pamela Trucks, Mesa, AZ; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Sharon VanDewark, San Diego, CA; Ronald Weddle, Golden, CO; Scott White, Durango, CO; Eilean D. Yates, Pittsboro, NC.

March 2014 Issue

Tomb of John Russell Colvin


The Red Fort of Agra, India, is where January’s photo was taken. It shows the tomb of John Russell Colvin, a British civil servant who served as lieutenant-governor of British India's North-West Frontier Provinces in the 1850s.
The tomb of John Russell Colvin.

Four years after Colvin was appointed to the post, mutiny (now known as India’s First War for Independence) erupted in India. In 1857, at the height of the rebellion, Colvin died of cholera at the age of 50. The rebellion signaled the end of India’s rule by Britain’s East India Company and the beginning of direct rule by the British crown. The British Raj (reign) lasted from 1857 to 1947, when the Indian Empire was split into two sovereign states: India and Pakistan.

Shortly before his death, Colvin issued a proclamation that recommended leniency for most of the rebels. Although this policy was criticized at the time, British authorities eventually adopted it.

The 94-acre Red Fort, a combination of Hindu and Islamic architecture, was rebuilt with red sandstone by Mughals in the 16th century. The original fort was made of brick as early as the 11th century.

Four correct answers were submitted, and WILLIAM RAFFEL of Savannah, Georgia, won the drawing. We thank David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Lavinia Marx, Portland, OR; WINNER: William Raffel, Savannah, GA; Pam Reimann, Evansville, IN.
Tomb of John Russell Colvin

Mausoleo di Teodorico, Italy

February 2014 Issue

Mausoleo di Teodorico, Italy


Planning ahead, Theoderic (sometimes spelled Theodoric) the Great, king of the Ostrogoths from AD 493 until his death in 526, built his tomb in 520 on the outskirts of Ravenna, Italy. Pictured in the December '13 issue, the Mausoleo di Teodorico, the only surviving example of a king's tomb from this period, is recognized for its style and decoration,* devoid of any Roman or Byzantine artwork. The lower story of the mausoleum is a decagon, while the upper story is circular, with a 36-foot-wide monolithic dome made of limestone imported from Istria (in modern-day Croatia).

Twelve correct answers were submitted, and D'NESE GRANGER of Princeville, Hawaii, won the drawing. We thank Solomon Gold of Las Vegas, Nevada, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Jack Brown, Chicago, IL; Yvonne Dixon, Washington, D.C.; Richard A. Foltz, Emmaus, PA; WINNER: D'nese Granger, Princeville, HI; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Karen Knish, Canton, OH; Margaret McCormick, Brookline, MA; Janet McGary, Sunnyvale, CA; Patricia Ove, Rio Rancho, NM; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Richard Taylor, Natchitoches, LA; Claire Wait, Sutter Creek, CA.

*In the February '14 issue, the answer stated that the Mausoleum of Theoderic the Great "has been recognized for its Gothic style and decoration." Reader David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, who has a master's degree in Art and Architectural History, pointed out, "Built in 520 CE, the mausoleum is difficult to identify stylistically. It's really not Byzantine, nor can one call it Early Christian. It's also too early to call Romanesque. I'd probably call it very late Roman." (Correction published in the March 2014 issue.)

January 2014 Issue

Ak-Sarai Palace, Uzbekistan


Over 600 years have passed since construction began on the structure you see in November’s photo. It is what remains of Ak-Saray (Ak-Sarai), which was Amir Timur’s (Amir Temur's) summer palace, built in his hometown of Shakhrisabz, Uzbekistan. Construction is said to have begun in 1380, and a surviving inscription gives the date of the palace's completion as "798 A.H.," or AD 1395-96. However, further construction and embellishment went on until Timur's death in 1405. Today, all that remains are the huge portals.
Ak-Sarai Palace, Uzbekistan

The ruler of Uzbekistan, Amir Timur — also known as Timur the Great and Tamerlane — believed his buildings to be the best in the world. One legend claims that gold sand was put into the clay used to make the first bricks for the palace. The height of the main portal was 230 feet, as tall as a 20-story building, and the corner towers were more than 30 feet taller than that.

Twenty-four correct answers were submitted, and PRESTON REEVES of Seguin, Texas, won the drawing. We thank Alan R. Lichtenstein of Commack, New York, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Bette Adelman, Scottsdale, AZ; Dottie & Bud Anderson, Concord, CA; Shirley & Victor Becker, Skokie, IL; Robert Bowes, Cleveland Heights, OH; Robert W. Clemmer, Yorba Linda, CA; Brooks Goddard, Needham, MA; Stuart A. Green, M.D., Los Alamitos, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Magali V. Hinojosa, Laredo, TX; Neil Johnson, San Jose, CA; Mark Kirby, New York, NY; Janet Lakin, Redmond, OR; Joseph B. Lambert, San Antonio, TX; David J. Patten, St. Petersburg, FL; Dr. Richard C. Pearson, Raleigh, NC; WINNER: Preston Reeves, Seguin, TX; Cleo Reilly, Portland, OR; Rick Sinding, Princeton, NJ; Jeanne & Dave Smith, Irvine, CA; George Sonnichsen, The Villages, FL; Barbara Virden, Santa Ana, CA; Robert C. Wilson, Indian Head, MD; Wendy Windebank, Pacific Palisades, CA; Teresa Zabala, Salinas, CA.
Ak-Sarai Palace, Uzbekistan

Cruz del Tercer Milenio, Chile

December 2013 Issue

Cruz del Tercer Milenio, Chile


Cruz del Tercer Milenio (Cross of the Third Millennium), Chile

October’s photo shows the Cruz del Tercer Milenio, or Cross of the Third Millennium, in Coquimbo, Chile, a monument erected to commemorate the Catholic Church’s Great Jubilee, in 2000, in recognition of the beginning of the third millennium following the birth of Christ.

Erected at the summit of Cerro el Vigia (Lookout Hill) at 197 meters (646 feet) above sea level, the cross consists of three columns emerging from an equilateral triangle, representing the Holy Trinity. It also has a high-tech bell tower, life-size bronze sculptures of the Stations of the Cross, a large chapel and a replica of Michelangelo’s "Pietà."

Standing 83 meters (272 feet) tall, the cross is the tallest monument in South America. The arms of the cross stretch 40 meters wide, and windows allow a 360-degree panoramic view of the city, bay and Pacific Ocean. Visitors can reach the windows by elevator or stairs in the structure’s central column.

Nine correct answers were submitted, and BRIAN WEAVER of Burlington, Kentucky, won the drawing. We thank Jack W. Dini of Livermore, California, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were sent in by:

Cynthia Bauzon, Rockville, MD; Terrell Emmons, Springfield, VA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; John & Eileen Leach, Hickory, NC; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Charles Rhine, Greeley, CO; Maureen Rompasky, Kula, HI; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; WINNER: Brian Weaver, Burlington, KY.

November 2013 Issue

Druk Wangyal Khangzang, Bhutan


September’s photo depicts the Druk Wangyal Khangzang at Dochula Pass in Bhutan, 30 kilometers northeast of the capital, Thimphu.
Druk Wangyal Khangzang at Dochula Pass in Bhutan

In 2003, Assamite separatists from India set up military operations within Bhutan’s borders. The usually peaceful Bhutanese raised an army 7,000 strong to drive the rebels back over the border. Druk Wangyal, constructed in 2004, honors the souls of those who died. It comprises a main chorten and some of the surrounding 108 smaller chortens. (A chorten is a religious structure commemorating an event or person or which acts as protection for a place. 108 is one of the holy numbers in Buddhism.)

Reader Gloria Helmuth of Tulsa, Oklahoma, saw the memorial with a guide who had fought in the battle.

Eighty-seven correct answers were sent in, and GEORGE W. HOBGOOD of Austin, Texas, won the drawing. We thank Keith D. Jackson of Parksville, British Columbia, Canada, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were sent in by:

Mr. & Mrs. D. Adolphson, Walnut Creek, CA; Ronald Arrants, Benicia, CA; Gary & Lajetta Atwood, Burien, WA; V. Ruth Barnes, Merritt Island, FL; Gerald Becker, Calabasas, CA; Mrs. Peter Beuret, Santa Barbara, CA; Fritz Beyerlein, Sunnyvale, CA; Rita Bocher, Wynnewood, PA; Paul Braeckmans, San Gabriel, CA; Betty Breed, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Marie Brown, Baldwin, NY; Steven Buchwalter, West Orange, NJ; Mary Bush, Hillsboro, OR; Ron Calderoni, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada; V. Joan Campbell, Reynoldsburg, OH; Julie Cassen, Charlotte, NC; Phyllis Christenson, Monument, CO; Lydia Clement, Las Vegas, NV; Deborah Conklin, Cedar Rapids, IA; Irving Dayton, Corvallis, OR; Beverly De Graaf, Morristown, NJ; Linda Devlin, Waterbury, VT; Donn Duling, Omaha, NE; Edwin Tobias Earl, Laguna Beach, CA; Betty Edmonson, Tucson, AZ; Alvin Faierman, Del Mar, CA; Bruce Fink, Londonderry, NH; Julie Fisher, Sacramento, CA; Ione Fujio, Honolulu, HI; Helen Gigliotti, Sanger, CA; Don Gillies, Santa Barbara, CA; Russell Gluck, Franklin Lakes, NJ; Kenneth Gould, Clearwater Beach, FL; Dora Gropp, Anchorage, AK; Susan Hart, Delmar, NY; Gloria Helmuth, Tulsa, OK; Iris Herrin, St. Augustine, FL; WINNER: George Hobgood, Austin, TX; Carol Hodgson, De Pere, WI; Linda Huetinck, Alhambra, CA; Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Kathleen Jensen, Alameda, CA; Marilyn Jestes, Roulette, PA; J. Christine Johnson, San Ramon, CA; Judie Johnson, Grand Marais, MN; Sabine Joyce, Harwood, MD; Arno Lauterbach, San Jose, CA; David Ligerman, Miami, FL; Sandra Lovell, Cambridge, MA; Helen Maguire, Great Falls, MT; Clark Masters, Westborough, MA; Rosemary McDaniel, Trenton, FL; Barbara McIntosh, Roseville, CA; Josephine Moore, New Windsor, NY; Bonnie Neel, Springfield, VA; Michael Newman, Los Angeles, CA; Dave Netzer, West Barnstable, MA; Mark Paine, North Salem, NY; Marisol Pelaez-Leong, Brooklyn, NY; Joel Pollack, Denver, CO; Beth Powell; Judi Purcell, Pensacola Beach, FL; Vicki Reed, San Diego, CA; Wanda Ross, Cupertino, CA; Larry Sanchez, La Mesa, CA; Phyllis Schlesinger, New York, NY; Cindy Shurtleff, Seattle, WA; Jeanne Smith, Irvine, CA; Francine Sterle, Iron, MN; Phyllis & David Stolls, Riverside, CA; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Charlotte Temple; Diana Thomson; Susan Tittle, Palos Verdes Estates, CA; Peg Tredennick, Littleton, CO; Robert Turk, Dayton, OH; Alice Tucker, Honolulu, HI; Mary Turney, WY; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Kathryn Verwillow, Palo Alto, CA; Richard Walker, La Jolla, CA; Gail Wang, Troy, MI; Yvette Wigman-Childers, Honolulu, HI; Mark Wilkins, Sedro Woolley, WA; Wendy Windebank, Pacific Palisades, CA; and Sandra Winter, San Diego, CA.
Druk Wangyal Khangzang, Bhutan

Taung Kalat Buddhist monastery, Myanmar

October 2013 Issue

Taung Kalat Buddhist monastery, Myanmar


A precarious pyroclastic perch? August’s photo depicts the lovely Taung Kalat Buddhist monastery, which sits atop a 2,417-foot-high, sheer-sided volcanic plug that formed way off on the southwestern slope of 4,981-foot-high Mount Popa in central Myanmar.
Czech artist David Cerny’s sculpture “Man Hanging Out”

It’s believed that 37 nats (demigods) make Taung Kalat their home, and there are festivals every year at which devotees, bearing flowers and other offerings, climb the 777 steps to the shrine at the top. Pilgrims and visitors are cautioned to keep an eye out for the resident macaque monkeys, who like to help themselves to anything not nailed down.

Twenty-one correct answers were sent in, and DORANNE JACOBSON of Springfield, Illinois, won the drawing. We thank Joan Poultney and Lewis Whitaker of Wilton, Connecticut, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were sent in by:

Shirley Becker, Skokie, IL; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Edwin Tobias Earl, Laguna Beach, CA; Lucille Fjoslien, San Francisco, CA; Dora Gropp, Anchorage, AK; Louis Haba, Somis, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Magali Hinojosa, Laredo, TX; WINNER: Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Eddie Joseph, Encino, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Steve Lopes, Lawrence, KS; Chuck Perelman, Culver City, CA; Tad Riley, Fairfield, CA; Joy Robinson, Palo Alto, CA; Helga Smith, New York, NY; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Karen Watkins, Schenectady, NY; Violet White, Carmel, IN; Kathy Wilhelm, Cary, NC; and Michael & Janet Wincour, Beverly, MA.