Where in the World Archives

November 2014 Issue

Hall of Liberation, Kelheim, Germany



The Befreiungshalle (Hall of Liberation), which stands on Mount Michelsberg above the city of Kelheim, Germany, was shown in the photo in the September issue. Overlooking the Danube a few miles upstream from Regensburg, the hall commemorates the country’s victories over Napoleon during the Wars of Liberation, which lasted from 1813 to 1815.

Construction of the 18-sided, 150-foot-tall rotunda began in 1842 upon orders from King Ludwig I of Bavaria, and it was completed in 1863. Standing inside the neoclassical rotunda and paying tribute to the combined efforts of the Germans are 34 winged goddesses of victory. Positioned between them are shields, each noting one of the 17 battles that were fought. The hall opened on Oct. 18, 1863, the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Nations (also known as the Battle of Leipzig).

Twenty people correctly identified the subject and location of the photo, and BETSY MAHONEY of Spearfish, South Dakota, won the drawing. We thank Donna Pyle of Boulder, Colorado, for submitting the picture.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Nanci Alexander, Lexington, KY; Dick Alvernaz, Lakeside, CA; Gary & Lajetta Atwood, Burien, WA; Paul H. Bass, Charlotte, NC; Lowell Bowie, Cincinnati, OH; Janet Brenneman, Grand Junction, CO; Ann Burk, Mechanicsburg, PA; David Davis, Phoenix, AZ; Richard Fox, Ventura, CA; Douglas Francefort, Cos Cob, CT; Marilyn Goeldner, Boone, IA; Gerald Gould, Cumming, GA; Irma Gurman, Smithtown, NY; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Vikki Johnson, Elbert, CO; Susan Kipp, Oyster Bay, NY; WINNER:  Betsy Mahoney, Spearfish, SD; Donald H. Osborne, Pittsfield, MA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Robert A. Siebert, Jamaica, NY; Joanne Stone, Tucson, AZ.
Hall of Liberation, Kelheim, Germany

Gregory of Nin (Grgur Ninski) in Split, Croatia

October 2014 Issue

Gregory of Nin (Grgur Ninski) in Split, Croatia



This statue of Gregory of Nin (Grgur Ninski in Croatian), a medieval bishop from Croatia who strongly opposed the Pope, stands just outside the Golden Gate of Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia. (The palace was built by a Roman emperor in the fourth century.)

Bishop Gregory introduced the national Croatian language into Catholic services in Croatia after the Great Assembly in AD 926, finally making it possible for everyone to know what was being said. Prior to that, services had been held only in Latin, which few people understood. As a result, Christianity grew stronger within the Croatian kingdom.

Sculptor Ivan Meštrović  created the 20-foot-tall statue in 1929 in commemoration of 1,000 years having passed since Croatian was first spoken in religious services. Because of the popular belief that rubbing the bishop’s toe brings good luck, the toe is now smooth and shiny. (Two smaller statues of the same bishop, with slightly different poses, also exist, one in Varaždin, the other in Nin.)

Sixty-four people correctly identified the location of the photo, and ROBIN ILARDI of Morgantown, West Virginia, won the drawing. We thank Wanda Bahde of Summerfield, Florida, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Herbert E. Allen, Bala Cynwyd, PA; Diane Baker, Corona del Mar, CA; Gerald M. Bishop, Merrillville, IN; Dorothy Bohan, Webster City, IA; James Brenneman, Grand Junction, CO; Patricia Bunyard, Cambria, CA; Diana Butler, El Sobrante, CA; Ida M. Cartwright, Grass Valley, CA; Julie Cassen, Charlotte, NC; Tamara Compton, Bellingham, WA; Eric J. Dalton, New Hudson, MI; Tuvshin Dashtseren, South Miami, FL; Marilou Dillehay, Stonewall, LA; Carol Eggers, Lake Forest, CA; David Fetyko, Stow, OH; Lucille Fjoslien, San Francisco, CA; Bill Flounders, Santa Fe, NM; Janice Gay, Vero Beach, FL; Margie Gerhardt, Lancaster, PA; Gerald & Sylvie Gould, Cumming, GA; Ada Green, New York, NY; Thomas Griffith, Vancouver, WA; George Guma, Vienna, VA; Ed Hall, Calera, AL; Kathleen Harrington, Stanwood, IA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Allan S. Hodgson, Lakeway, TX; Libby Hollombe, Sherman Oaks, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; WINNER: Robin Ilardi, Morgantown, WV; Leslie Jamison, Wilmington, DE; Chris Johnson, San Ramon, CA; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Len Kaufman, Merrick, NY; Kathy Kostrub, Landisville, PA; Sylvia Levi, Studio City, CA; Alan Levitan, Morristown, NJ; Jeremy Loeckler, Boston, MA; Loree Marcantonio, Vancouver, B.C., Canada; Bob McCarron, Cuyahoga Falls, OH; Sandra Spitzer McKelvey, Abington, PA; Eve Melton, Palo Alto, CA; Sherri Morgan, Denver, CO; Ira Nathan, Shreveport, LA; Ron Oakham, Tucson, AZ; David J. Patten, St. Petersburg, FL; Arne Pedersen, Little Silver, NJ; Donna Peterson, Patch Grove, WI; Beth Powell, Eureka, CA; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, CA; Meda Rebecca, Sacramento, CA; Jennifer Rowe, Aurora, CO; Mona Sage, Ponca City, OK; Jean Savage, San Juan Capistrano, CA; Kay Stevens, Santa Barbara, CA; Claire Troop, Wernersville, PA; Kathleen Vieth, Thousand Oaks, CA; Laurel Webb, Chandler, AZ; Jan Wigen, Spokane, WA; Kathy Wilhelm, Cary, NC; Linda Williams, Boise, ID; Margo Wilson, Scottsdale, AZ; Robert C. Wilson, Indian Head, MD; Roberta Wilson, Concord, CA.

September 2014 Issue

Sigiriya (Lion Rock), Sri Lanka


Sigiriya, also known as Lion Rock, sits near the center of the island of Sri Lanka. Over 1,500 years ago, the 660-foot-tall column of rock was the centerpiece of a walled city complex measuring almost two miles wide and over half a mile long. On top of the rock plateau, a fortified palace was built by King Kasyapa, who ruled from AD 477 to 495. Partway up the rock, visitors entered the fortress through the mouth of an enormous lion constructed of bricks. Sigiriya and the grounds of the lower city featured advanced underground water conduits and landscaped gardens.

Kasyapa had risen to power by having his father put to death. He feared revenge from his half-brother, Moggallana, the rightful heir, who fled to southern India. He built the fortress for protection, but it wasn’t enough. Moggallana returned in AD 495, vanquishing Kasyapa and his army.

The palace became neglected and is no longer there. The lion’s head collapsed many years ago and all that remains are its paws, which were pictured in the July 2014 issue. To this day, during the rainy season, water fountains at the base of the rock are still functional.

Forty-nine people correctly identified the subject of the photo, and MICHAEL R. SHARON, M.D., of Ellington, Connecticut, won the drawing. We thank Dick Alvernaz of Lakeside, California, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Dottie & Bud Anderson, Concord, CA; Diana Butler, El Sobrante, CA; Steven Clift, North Little Rock, AR; Meg Coulter, Los Angeles, CA; Edwin Earl, Laguna Beach, CA; Bill Fagan, San Diego, CA; Femi Faminu, Los Angeles, CA; Diane Powell Ferguson, Scottsdale, AZ; Sherryl Frisch, Wimauma, FL; Deborah Futch, Winter Haven, FL; Norma & Steve Goldberger, Milford, OH; John Golden, Washington, D.C.; Susan Greek, Corona, CA; Freddi Hammerschlag, Highland, MD; Phil Haney, Laguna Beach, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Magali Hinojosa, Laredo, TX; Samuel Leon Hockman, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Conrad Houge, South Colby, WA; Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Diane Jarrett, Newport Beach, CA; Henry Kammerer, Grand Island, NY; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; George C. Kingston, East Longmeadow, MA; Robert Knox, Hollywood, CA; Janet Kolbaska, Mount Prospect, IL; Sylvia Levi, Studio City, CA; Herschell Gordon Lewis, Pompano Beach, FL; Allan Little III, Atlanta, GA; Lisa McCary, Laredo, TX; Nili Olay, New York, NY; James Oliver, Memphis, TN; Sherry Pate, Fort Myers, FL; Sharon Phillis, Kingwood, TX; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Lakshman Ratnapala, San Francisco, CA; Cliff Rhode; Dennis Rompasky, Kula, HI; Jo Ellen Ryan, Davis, CA; Kenneth Schwartz, Los Angeles, CA; WINNER: Michael R. Sharon, Ellington, CT; George Sonnichsen, The Villages, FL; Antonia Sparano, Los Angeles, CA; Edith H. Speir, Annandale, VA; James Stefan, Sarasota, FL; Neal Steinbrenner, Costa Mesa, CA; Phyllis & David Stolls, Riverside, CA; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Kathy Wilhelm, Cary, NC.
Sigiriya (Lion Rock), Sri Lanka

Tumuli Park, Gyeongju, South Korea

August 2014 Issue

Tumuli Park, Gyeongju, South Korea


Unmistakable to those who have visited the site pictured here in the June 2014 issue are the royal burial mounds in Tumuli Park (also known as Daereungwon), located in Gyeongju (Kyongju), South Korea. There are 23 mounds in the park, each containing the ancient tomb of a king or nobleman from the Silla (Shilla) Kingdom, a dynasty that lasted almost 1,000 years, from 57 BC to AD 935.
Tumuli Park

Gyeongju is about 200 miles southeast of the country’s capital, Seoul, a 4-hour bus ride away. In the mid-1970s, houses were removed from the area and several tombs excavated. Visitors can walk to all of the tombs on paths winding through the park.

The most well-known tombs there are King Michu’s “Bamboo Tomb”; the double-humped tomb known as Hwangnam Daechong (believed to have belonged to a royal couple), and Cheonmachong (Heavenly Horse Tomb), where more than 10,000 artifacts were discovered in 1973. Cheonmachong is the only tomb open to visitors; it shows some of the artifacts and how they were arranged.

Nine correct answers were submitted, and ALLAN S. HODGSON of Lakeway, Texas, won the drawing. We thank Kathy Wilhelm of Cary, North Carolina, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Edna R.S. Alvarez, Los Angeles, CA; Terrell M. Emmons, Springfield, VA; Pauline Griffith, Los Angeles, CA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; WINNER: Allan Hodgson, Lakeway, TX; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Linda Huetinck, Alhambra, CA; Theodore Liebersfeld, Boynton Beach, FL; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA.

July 2014 Issue

Curvilinear Range, Irish National Botanic Gardens, in Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland


The mystery photo in the May 2014 issue was taken in the Irish National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin, a neighborhood in the Northside area of Dublin, Ireland. The row of greenhouses is part of a structure called the Curvilinear Range.

Most of those who submitted guesses, however, thought the picture was taken at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, England. There's no mystery why the structures are similar. Dublin-born ironmaster Richard Turner, who designed the Curvilinear Range, was also involved with the design and construction of the Victorian-style Palm Houses at Kew Gardens and in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

In the Glasnevin gardens (where admission is free), the oldest part of the Curvilinear Range is the East Wing, built in 1843. The remaining sections of the building were completed in 1869, when the size of each of the two extreme wings was doubled. Renovations done in 1995 used the structure’s original wrought iron.

Built between 1844 and 1848, the Victorian-style Palm House in London's Kew Gardens is 30 feet longer than Glasnevin’s Curvilinear Range, and, at its highest point, 32 feet taller than the central dome in Glasnevin’s row of greenhouses.

MARIANNE AYRES of Tucson, Arizona, provided the only correct answer. We thank Diane Harrison of Chesterfield, Missouri, for contributing the photo. Diane told ITN that she’s been to Kew Gardens as well and thinks the greenhouses at Glasnevin are more beautiful.
Curvilinear Range, Irish National Botanic Gardens, in Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland

Manaca-Iznaga Tower, Cuba

June 2014 Issue

Manaca-Iznaga Tower, Cuba


Manaca-Iznaga Tower

Looking down from the top of Manaca-Iznaga Tower over the Valle de Los Ingenios (Valley of the Sugar Mills), a UNESCO World Heritage Site in central Cuba, is an experience that was limited to only a few privileged individuals a couple of centuries ago.

Pictured in the April 2014 issue, the tower was built in 1816 by Alejo Maria Iznaga y Borrell, a plantation owner who wanted to make sure others recognized his power and wealth. The bell that hung in the tower announced the start and end of each workday for slaves working in the sugar mills and plantations, but it also sounded an alarm should any of them escape. At one time, more than 30,000 slaves worked in cane sugar mills throughout the three valleys.

A 184-step stairway in the center of the 147-foot tower, 12 kilometers northwest of the town of Trinidad, takes visitors all the way to the top. Divided into seven levels of different geometric shapes, the tower is made of mud bricks and a mortar of lime and sand.

Five correct answers were submitted, and JOYCE RENEE LEWIS of Camano Island, Washington, won the drawing. We thank Diana Butler of El Sobrante, California, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

T.M. Elefant, San Jose, CA; Wendlandt Hasselle, Tunica, MS; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; WINNER: Joyce Renee Lewis, Camano Island, WA; Mark A. Varnau, Indianapolis, IN.

May 2014 Issue

Falkirk Wheel, Scotland


Just west of the town of Falkirk in central Scotland is where you’ll see the unusual structure shown in the photo in the March 2014 issue. The Falkirk Wheel is the only rotating boat lift in the world. It connects the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal near Falkirk, transporting narrowboats 115 feet between the different levels of water.
Falkirk Wheel

When the lift opened in 2002, it was the first time the two canals had been connected since the 1930s, when the locks were dismantled after the canals fell into disuse. Located halfway between Edinburgh and Glasgow, the lift also reopened the water route between the two cities. Prior to 1933, boats traveled through a series of 11 locks between the canals.

Actually, the picture shows the aqueduct that connects the Union Canal to the Falkirk Wheel’s upper gondola. (Karl Snepp of Redmond, WA, and the Lathens of Occidental, CA — who were among those who guessed correctly — pointed this out.)

Twenty-three correct answers were submitted, and MARIE T. MURR of Mooresville, NC, won the drawing. We thank Judy Spielman of Philadelphia, PA, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Stephen O. Addison, Jr., Charlotte, NC; Thomas Beam, Great Falls, MT; Jerry Coleman, Sebastopol, CA; Jan Foster, Seattle, WA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jeffrey Henn, Tinton Falls, NJ; Allan Hodgson, Lakeway, TX; Lee Lamond, North Wales, PA; Sue Larson, Mountain View, CA; Melanie & Gary Lathen, Occidental, CA; Nancy A. Logan, Jamestown, RI; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Cynthia E. Lyle, San Antonio, TX; Alexander McDonald, Dana Point, CA; WINNER: Marie T. Murr, Mooresville, NC; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Donna Pyle, Boulder, CO; David Riegert, Reno, NV; Karl Snepp, Redmond, WA; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Robert P. Townley, Columbia, CA; Dr. Joseph Whitehouse, Oakland, CA; Janet D. Sheridan & DeWitt (Dee) Whittington, Richmond, VA.
Falkirk Wheel, Scotland

Defenders of the Soviet Arctic

April 2014 Issue

Defenders of the Soviet Arctic


If the February “Where in the World?” photo looked familiar, it’s because a picture of the same monument was printed in this space in the April '12 issue. This time, however, you got to see the FRONT of the statue.
Alyosha

The massive monument “Defenders of the Soviet Arctic during the Great Patriotic War,” also known as Alyosha, stands in Murmansk, northwestern Russia, honoring the Soviet soldiers, sailors and airmen who defended their homeland against the Germans during World War II. In October of this year, it will have been 40 years since Alyosha was erected.

Thirty-three correct answers were submitted, and JOHN KIRCHGESNER of Demarest, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Pete Gandell of San Francisco, California, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Irina, Ontario, Canada; Patricia Bunyard, Cambria, CA; Janice Buxton, Huntington Beach, CA; Ron Dahl, Balboa, CA; Susan Darsey, La Selva Beach, CA; Tom & Linda DeChaine, Penn Valley, CA; Marilyn Drews, San Mateo, CA; Nan Hampton, Austin, TX; Stephen Jeffries, Centennial, CO; Leslie Jones, Oakland, CA; KR Kennedy, Portland, OR; WINNER: John Kirchgesner, Demarest, NJ; Lee Lamond, North Wales, PA; Sue Larson, Mountain View, CA; Kenneth Levine, Greenbelt, MD; Phil Lutzi, St. Pete Beach, FL; Sandra Lydahl, Temple, TX; Carol Ann Nulk, San Jose, CA; Anthony Osretkar, Frederick, MD; Sally Otto, Dunedin, FL; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; John Reading, Brookline, MA; Gerry Rollefson, St. Michaels, MD; Lorenz Rychner, Denver, CO; Mona Sage, Ponca City, OK; Barbara Skelly, Oakland, CA; Michael Tolle, Menlo Park, CA; Pamela Trucks, Mesa, AZ; Charles Twine, Durham, NC; Sharon VanDewark, San Diego, CA; Ronald Weddle, Golden, CO; Scott White, Durango, CO; Eilean D. Yates, Pittsboro, NC.

March 2014 Issue

Tomb of John Russell Colvin


The Red Fort of Agra, India, is where January’s photo was taken. It shows the tomb of John Russell Colvin, a British civil servant who served as lieutenant-governor of British India's North-West Frontier Provinces in the 1850s.
The tomb of John Russell Colvin.

Four years after Colvin was appointed to the post, mutiny (now known as India’s First War for Independence) erupted in India. In 1857, at the height of the rebellion, Colvin died of cholera at the age of 50. The rebellion signaled the end of India’s rule by Britain’s East India Company and the beginning of direct rule by the British crown. The British Raj (reign) lasted from 1857 to 1947, when the Indian Empire was split into two sovereign states: India and Pakistan.

Shortly before his death, Colvin issued a proclamation that recommended leniency for most of the rebels. Although this policy was criticized at the time, British authorities eventually adopted it.

The 94-acre Red Fort, a combination of Hindu and Islamic architecture, was rebuilt with red sandstone by Mughals in the 16th century. The original fort was made of brick as early as the 11th century.

Four correct answers were submitted, and WILLIAM RAFFEL of Savannah, Georgia, won the drawing. We thank David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Doranne Jacobson, Springfield, IL; Lavinia Marx, Portland, OR; WINNER: William Raffel, Savannah, GA; Pam Reimann, Evansville, IN.
Tomb of John Russell Colvin

Mausoleo di Teodorico, Italy

February 2014 Issue

Mausoleo di Teodorico, Italy


Planning ahead, Theoderic (sometimes spelled Theodoric) the Great, king of the Ostrogoths from AD 493 until his death in 526, built his tomb in 520 on the outskirts of Ravenna, Italy. Pictured in the December '13 issue, the Mausoleo di Teodorico, the only surviving example of a king's tomb from this period, is recognized for its style and decoration,* devoid of any Roman or Byzantine artwork. The lower story of the mausoleum is a decagon, while the upper story is circular, with a 36-foot-wide monolithic dome made of limestone imported from Istria (in modern-day Croatia).

Twelve correct answers were submitted, and D'NESE GRANGER of Princeville, Hawaii, won the drawing. We thank Solomon Gold of Las Vegas, Nevada, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Jack Brown, Chicago, IL; Yvonne Dixon, Washington, D.C.; Richard A. Foltz, Emmaus, PA; WINNER: D'nese Granger, Princeville, HI; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Karen Knish, Canton, OH; Margaret McCormick, Brookline, MA; Janet McGary, Sunnyvale, CA; Patricia Ove, Rio Rancho, NM; Jill Sullivan, Waynesboro, VA; Richard Taylor, Natchitoches, LA; Claire Wait, Sutter Creek, CA.

*In the February '14 issue, the answer stated that the Mausoleum of Theoderic the Great "has been recognized for its Gothic style and decoration." Reader David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, who has a master's degree in Art and Architectural History, pointed out, "Built in 520 CE, the mausoleum is difficult to identify stylistically. It's really not Byzantine, nor can one call it Early Christian. It's also too early to call Romanesque. I'd probably call it very late Roman." (Correction published in the March 2014 issue.)