Where in the World Archives

The Memorial of Adshimushkay, near Kerch, Ukraine

April 2009 Issue

The Memorial of Adshimushkay, near Kerch, Ukraine



Tragedy told in mute stone. . . Beneath these carved limestone cliffs in Adzhimushkay, near Kerch, Ukraine, a series of natural catacombs was expanded by miners, starting in 1830, until a complex underground network was created.

In May 1942, after the Wehrmacht defeated the Red Army, which was defending the Kerch Peninsula and Sevastopol, remnants of the Soviet forces along with thousands of civilians fled to the catacombs, where they were besieged by the Germans. Although they had few supplies, the Soviets held out for 170 days until driven out by poison gas and explosives. Only 48 of the original 13,000 defenders survived the siege.

Today this sculpture, the Memorial of Adshimushkay, and a museum mark the site.

One reader sent in the correct answer by the deadline, PAUL E. WICKLUND of Wayzata, Minnesota. We thank Jill and Bob Sullivan of Waynesboro, Virginia, for sending in the picture. 

March 2009 Issue

"The Beehive" in Wellington, New Zealand


The Beehive

Staying right where it is, thank you very much!

January’s photo depicts “The Beehive,” the Executive Wing of New Zealand’s Parliament buildings, located in Wellington, North Island. Based on a sketch drawn on a napkin by Sir Basil Spence, it was built in the 1970s.

Twenty years later there was a proposal to move the entire structure in order to extend the building that houses Parliament, but public outcry nixed that plan and, for now, anyway, the busy Prime Minister and his Cabinet can keep buzzing away on the corner of Molesworth Street and Lambton Quay.

Forty readers sent in the correct answer and ROBERT T. PANDOLFO of Punta Gorda, Florida, won the drawing. We thank Marion Rafferty of Easton, Pennsylvania, for sending in the photo.
"The Beehive" in Wellington, New Zealand

Memorial to the Villages Overrun by the Soviets, Warsaw

February 2009 Issue

Memorial to the Villages Overrun by the Soviets, Warsaw


Memorial to the Villages Overrun by the Soviets

On Sept. 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland from the west. Sixteen days later, on Sept. 17, the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the east, annexed more than half the country and began a reign of repression and murder that would result in hundreds of thousands of Poles being shipped to Siberian labor camps, where uncounted thousands died.

Today in Warsaw, the Memorial to the Villages Overrun by the Soviets is located on Muranowska Street. The cart of crosses, seen in the photo sent by Thomas Elefant of San Jose, California, is only part of the memorial. A row of railroad ties, each bearing the name of a Polish village or city taken over by the Soviets, extends from the front of the cart.

Twenty-two readers sent in correct answers, and LESTER MOTYKA of Lake Zurich, Illinois, won the drawing.

January 2009 Issue

Six Banyan Tree Temple in Guangzhou, China


Six Banyan Tree Temple in Guangzhou, China

Mystery solved! Really, is there anywhere ITN readers haven’t been? (And, in this case, any when, too!)

Jo Ann Scott of Lacey, Washington, sent in this picture of two Buddhas taken on a trip to Asia in 1983, but she couldn’t recollect where she took it. (Note to self: label all those travel pictures ASAP.) 

Well, one reader, GARY YOST of Seattle, Washington, just happened upon the same site. . . in the same year (1983) as Jo Ann Scott. . . and took several shots from the same angle that Jo Ann’s picture was taken, complete with workers and building materials.

There are actually three Buddhas at the site, which is the Six Banyan Tree Temple in Guangzhou (formerly Canton), China. They are Amitabha, Sakyamuni and Maitreya, the Buddhas of the Past, Present and Future. (A statue on the far left is not shown in this picture.)

Don’t look for them behind the temple if you go to Guangzhou today. One year after the picture was taken, the main hall was rebuilt to enclose the Buddhas, which have been painted and refurbished. So it really is amazing that Mr. Yost was in just the right place at the right time. — J.A.
Six Banyan Tree Temple in Guangzhou, China

The Temple of Canova, Possagno, Italy

December 2008 Issue

The Temple of Canova, Possagno, Italy


The Temple of Canova

At age nine, he sculpted two shrines out of Carrara marble in his hometown of Possagno, Italy, that still can be seen today. At 12, his impromptu sculpture of a lion (made from the butter at a nobleman’s dinner party) won him a lifelong patron. And at 63, two years before his death, Antonio Canova (1757-1822) laid the fist stone of the neoclassical temple that was to bear his name and his tomb: the Temple of Canova, the subject of October’s photo. The temple, located in Possagno, also holds works by Canova and other Italian artists.

Three readers sent in correct answers, and MARTHA JO MOREHOUSE of Glendale, California, won the drawing. We thank Carol and Bert Vorchheimer of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for sending in the photo.

November 2008 Issue

The Elephant Tower building in Bangkok, Thailand


The Elephant Tower building in Bangkok, Thailand


At least it’s not pink. . . . September’s photo shows the 32-story Elephant Tower building in Bangkok, Thailand. (You don’t see an elephant? Check out the “tusk” on the front and the round “eye.”)

Twelve readers got the correct answer, and JO ELLEN RYAN of Davis, California, won the drawing. With her answer, she added, “My husband and I saw this amazing building last year while on an OAT tour of Thailand. Our wonderful guide, whose nickname was Joe, lives near ‘The Elephant’ and told us that not everyone in Bangkok loves it. We thought it was an amazing structure and would have liked to have seen it close up.”

We thank William J. Hurley of Princeton, New Jersey, for sending the photo.
The Elephant Tower building in Bangkok, Thailand

The National Library of Belarus

October 2008 Issue

The National Library of Belarus


The National Library of Belarus

Rhombicuboctahedron: just try saying that three times fast. It’s easier to describe the shape of August’s subject, the 23-story National Library of Belarus, by its more common name: a diamond. Completed in 2006 and located in Minsk, Belarus, this may be the world’s only library that doubles as a nightlight. By night, 4,646 colored LED fixtures on the structure sparkle in a computer-controlled light show that can be changed to suit any occasion.  

Six readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and GORDON & JAN KUGLER of San Diego, California, won the drawing. We thank Carolyn Tyssen of Clifton, Texas, for sending in the photo.

September 2008 Issue

Stalls outside the Roman stadium in Perge, Turkey


Stalls outside the Roman stadium in Perge, Turkey
What’s a day at the chariot races without a place to buy some refreshing pomegranate punch, larks’ tongues on a stick or souvenirs for the kiddies? July’s photo depicts the merchants’ stalls outside the Roman stadium in Perge, Turkey, an important harbor city at the height of the Roman Empire’s rule of Asia Minor.

Twenty-two readers got the correct answer, and DIANNE BROWN of Autaugaville, Alabama, won the drawing. We thank B.L. Kuhlmann of Corona del Mar, California, for sending us the photo.
Stalls outside the Roman stadium in Perge, Turkey

Fountain near the Pile Gate, Dubrovnik

August 2008 Issue

Fountain near the Pile Gate, Dubrovnik


Fountain near the Pile Gate, Dubrovnik

The pause that refreshed. . . if you were a 15th-century Dubrovniki, that is. It was in 1438 that the Italian Onofrio dell Cava built a fountain near the Pile Gate in Dubrovnik. It brought springwater from 12 kilometers away to the city’s thirsty inhabitants. Today the Big Onofrio fountain is one of the Croatian city’s major landmarks. (Onofrio built a smaller fountain in Dubrovnik as well; it is in Luza Square.)

Sixty-two readers sent in the correct answer, and RUSTI OSEN of Shoreline, Washington, was the second entry we drew and the winner. Why, you may ask, did the second entry win? The first entry we drew had the correct answer, but the sender didn’t include his or her name and address. Dear readers, please don’t forget that crucial information!

We thank Patricia Minami of Rockville, Maryland, for sending in the photo.

July 2008 Issue

Mahogany albatross, Midway Atoll


Mahogany albatross, Midway Atoll

How’d you like one of these hanging around your neck?!

May’s photo depicts the 12-foot-tall mahogany albatross (aka gooney bird) carved by Lt. Cmdr. Robert C. Cook during his tour of Midway. The gooney bird is next to the Battle Memorial on Sand Island, Midway Atoll.

Twenty-four of our readers guessed “Midway,” but only four pinpointed the specific island. (Details count for Where in the World?!) The winner of the drawing is CHARLES E. ALEXANDER (retired U.S. Navy Medical Corp) of Oxford, Pennsylvania. We thank Evelyn S. Burge of Ventura, California, for sending in the photo.

 
Mahogany albatross, Midway Atoll