Where in the World Archives

Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England

February 2010 Issue

Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England


Stokesay Castle

One man’s home… became another man’s castle. 

The subject of December’s photo, Stokesay Castle, located near Craven Arms in southern Shropshire, England, is the oldest extant fortified manor house in England. Built by wealthy wool merchant Laurence of Ludlow in the 1280s, the house wasn’t referred to as a “castle” until the 16th century.

This was a toughie; only one reader sent in the correct answer by the deadline: CHRISTINE OWEN of Midland, Michigan. We thank Sol Gold of Las Vegas, Nevada, for contributing the photo.

January 2010 Issue

Mt. Torghatten on Torget Island, near Brønnøysund, Norway


DESCRIPTION

Norse shenanigans! The site of November’s photo is Mt. Torghatten on Torget Island, near Brønnøysund, Norway. Legend has it that one night the troll Hestmannen spied the beautiful troll Lekamøya and her seven sisters bathing and decided she was for him. But the girls fled and, although Hestmannen was on horseback, he couldn’t catch up.

Furious, he fired an arrow after Lekamøya. The troll king Sømna threw his hat up between her and the oncoming arrow just as the sun rose. As everyone knows, sunlight turns trolls into stone. The pierced hat turned to stone (Mt. Torghatten; note the natural tunnel, 553 feet long, in the center of the mountain), as did Hestmannen, the king and the Seven Sisters; they are nearby mountain peaks.

Forty-two readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline, and ALLYN BURKE of Diamond Springs, California, won the drawing. We thank Michelle Mellon of Rancho Palos Verdes, California, for contributing the photo.
Mt. Torghatten on Torget Island, near Brønnøysund, Norway

Wat Rong Khun in Chiang Rai, Thailand

December 2009 Issue

Wat Rong Khun in Chiang Rai, Thailand


Wat Rong Khun
The entrance of Wat Rong Khun, also known as the White Temple

Heaven and Hell. When visitors make their way to the entrance of Wat Rong Khun, also known as the White Temple, in Chiang Rai, Thailand, they pass the gruesome sculpture that was the subject of October’s photo (in the photo above, it’s at the far right in a pit beside the path). The hands represent souls in thrall to their cravings and desires burning in hell; to reach the Gate of Heaven, one must eliminate the cravings and cross the Bridge of Rebirth, seen in the temple photo.

Twelve readers sent in the correct answer by the dead- line, and MAUREEN BABULA of Phillipsburg, New Jersey, won the drawing. We thank Denny Thomas of Wando, South Carolina, for contributing the photo. 

November 2009 Issue

Alter Kranen (old crane) in Wurzburg, Germany


Alter Kranen (old crane), Würzburg, Germany

The crane on the Main: it could lift tons of grain.

The Alter Kranen (old crane) in Würzburg, Germany, was completed in 1773. Located conveniently next to the customs house in Würzburg, the crane was used until 1846 to unload cargo from ships on the Main River.

Six readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline, and SUSAN TARTAGLINO of Alwood, Texas, won the drawing. We thank Peter Klatt of Berkeley, California, for contributing the photo.
Alter Kranen (old crane) in Wurzburg, Germany

The set for “Shaka Zulu,” near Durban, South Africa

October 2009 Issue

The set for “Shaka Zulu,” near Durban, South Africa


Shakaland

Shaka, King of the Zulus (b. 1787- d. 1828), was the subject of epic poetry and song in Southern Africa and credited with uniting diverse tribes into the Zulu Nation.

For the 1986 South African Broadcasting Company TV series “Shaka Zulu,” the film company built a traditional Zulu umuzi (homestead) set in Nkwalini, near Durban, South Africa, complete with the impressive, elephant-tusk-bedecked gateway seen in August’s photo. The film set was bought by the Protea Hotel group and turned into Shakaland, where, today, visitors can see traditional tribal dancing, spear making and beer-drinking ceremonies, as well as stay in the adjacent 55-room hotel.

Fifteen readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and RITA VERA of Robstown, Texas, won the drawing. We thank Daissy P. Owen of Iowa City, Iowa, for contributing the photo.

September 2009 Issue

The Leviathan telescope in Parsontown, Ireland


The Leviathan in Parsontown, Ireland

Out of this world! The word “amateur” is derived from the Latin word “to love.” Irish amateur astronomer William Parsons, the third Earl of Rosse, truly showed his love of stellar science when he designed and constructed The Leviathan, a 72-inch reflector telescope, from 1840 to 1845.

Located at Birr Castle in Parsontown, in central Ireland, the telescope was for 75 years the largest in the world. Among the discoveries made by Lord Rosse was the galaxy M-51, aka the Whirlpool Galaxy.

Seven readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline, and JAMES OLIVER of Memphis, Tennessee, won the drawing. ITN’s stellar Assistant Editor Mary Beltran contributed the photo.
The Leviathan telescope in Parsontown, Ireland

Monument to the Discoveries in Belém, Portugal

August 2009 Issue

Monument to the Discoveries in Belém, Portugal


Monument to the Discoveries

Originally built out of temporary materials for the Portuguese World’s Fair in 1940, the subject of June’s photo, the Monument to the Discoveries, was recast in concrete in 1960 to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the death of Prince Henry the Navigator (the guy at the top holding a small sailing ship).

Located on the bank of the River Tagus in Belém, near Lisbon, Portugal, the monument was created by architect Cottinelli Telmo and sculptor Leopoldo de Almeida.

ITN readers set a record this month by sending in 395 (!!!) correct answers by the deadline. Congratulations to B.L. KUHLMANN of Corona del Mar, California, who won the drawing.

July 2009 Issue

Memorial for the Battle of Saipan


Memorial for the Battle of Saipan
The Battle of Saipan, June 15-July 9, 1944, was one of the fiercest battles of the Pacific war in World War II. When it became clear that they could not prevail, hundreds of Japanese soldiers and civilians, led by propaganda to believe the Allied troops would treat them barbarically, jumped to their deaths from two cliffs, known today as “Suicide Cliff” and “Banzai Cliff.”

Today, as a statue in a memorial park, Heiwa Kannon, Bodhisattva of Mercy and Peace, gives her blessing to the dead. The park is located four miles from San Roque on the northern tip of Saipan. Banzai Cliff is in the background to the north.

Eight readers sent in the correct answer, and ROBERT C. WILSON of Indian Head, Maryland, won the drawing. We thank Tressie Alvernaz of Lakeside, California, for sending in the photo.
Memorial for the Battle of Saipan

Chocolate Hills in Bohol province, Philippines

June 2009 Issue

Chocolate Hills in Bohol province, Philippines


Chocolate Hills in Bohol province, Philippines
The scenery is simply delicious!

Geologists debate how the more than 1,200 hills, each 30 to 50 meters high, were formed, but there’s no question that the Chocolate Hills in Bohol province, Philippines, pictured in the April issue, are the area’s most popular attraction.

By the end of the dry season the hills are brown, hence the name. However, many of you, like reader Evenyl Roemmich of Stockton, California, saw them when they were green, in what she termed their “Mint Hill” phase, during the rainy season.

Thirty-eight readers sent in correct answers, and MARJORIE KLINGAMAN of Mexico, Missouri, won the drawing. We thank Sandra and John Scott of Mexico, New York, for sending in the photo.

May 2009 Issue

Ichon-Qala in Khiva, Uzbekistan


The West Gate entrance to Ichon-Qala (the Old City) in Khiva, Uzbekistan
The photo in the March 2009 issue shows the West Gate entrance to Ichon-Qala (the Old City) in Khiva, Uzbekistan.

Six readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline, and VICTOR M. BECKER of Skokie, Illinois, won the drawing. We thank Rick Sinding of Princeton, New Jersey, for sending in the photo.
Ichon-Qala in Khiva, Uzbekistan