Where in the World Archives

September 2011 Issue

Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco


Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco
Most every reader who sent in an answer this month had one comment: this place stinks! (Literally.)

July’s photo depicts the Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco. Barbara McIntosh of Roseville, California, who contributed the photo, wrote, “The tannery has been in use since medieval times. With the natural dyes in reds, yellows and blues, the mud-brick vats are beautiful.

Hides from sheep, goats, cows and camels are first treated in the white vats, which are filled with a solution of pigeon droppings and lime to remove the hair. Next, barefoot workers dye the skins. An adjoining shop sells leather goods, from handbags to bacouches (colorful slippers).”

This was a popular one. We had 295 correct answers, and JOAN OFFERLE of Austin, Texas, won the drawing.
Chouara Tannery in Fes, Morocco

"Mount Sumeru," a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife

August 2011 Issue

"Mount Sumeru," a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife


“Mount Sumeru,” is a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife.

Not a lot of room at the top! The piece shown in June’s photo, “Mount Sumeru,” is a depiction of the Buddhist afterlife.

The 1.5-meter-high, bronze, Ming Dynasty statue stands in front of the Yonghegong (Hall of Harmony and Peace), one of the five halls comprising the Yonghe Temple (aka the Lama Temple) in Beijing, China.

As legend has it, at the very top of Mount Sumeru is paradise, where those who have achieved nirvana dwell.

Beneath that are the realms for mankind and the heavenly kings, while at the bottom, below the sea waves, “evil spirits, devils and criminals abide in hell.”

One reader sent in the correct answer by the deadline, so JOE ROBERSON of Opelika, Alabama, is the winner. We thank Dave Bruels of Seattle, Washington, for contributing the photo.

July 2011 Issue

Statue outside Museu da Indústria Baleeira, Portugal


The statue of a whaler outside the Museu da Indústria Baleeira in São Roque, Pico, Azores, Portugal

Thar she blows! May’s photo depicts the statue of a whaler, in his tiny craft, outside the Museu da Indústria Baleeira in São Roque, Pico, Azores, Portugal.

In 1979, Portugal outlawed whaling and turned the waters around the Azores into a natural refuge. Today, visitors can go whale-watching and peaceably observe a plethora of cetacean species, including sperm whales, blue whales, fin whales, orcas and many varieties of dolphins.

Fourteen readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline, and BEVERLY CONGLETON of Lehigh Acres, Florida, won the drawing. We thank John and Jean Frazier of Scarborough, Maine, for sending the photo.
Statue outside Museu da Indústria Baleeira, Portugal

Huashan (Flowery Mountain), located just outside Xi’an, China

June 2011 Issue

Huashan (Flowery Mountain), located just outside Xi’an, China


Huashan (Flowery Mountain) is located just outside of Xi’an, China, in Shaanxi Province.

When climbing the “Stairway to Heaven,” watch your step. In fact, the climb up the side of Huashan, the sacred mountain pictured in April’s photo, is so precipitous that signs read “No watching when walking. When walking, no watching” (suggesting that you stop climbing before taking your eyes off the path to enjoy the view).

Located just outside of Xi’an, China, in Shaanxi Province, Huashan (Flowery Mountain) has had a climbing path to its peak since, at least, the third century AD.

Today, you can climb the 5,295 feet of paths and stairways to the temples at the top or take a cable car partway and climb the rest.

Seven readers sent in the correct answer by the deadline and SUBHADRA SURESH of Cincinnati, Ohio, won the drawing. We thank Dave Bruels of Seattle, Washington, for contributing the photo.

May 2011 Issue

Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka


The sun never sets on the (former) British Empire. March’s photo depicts the very Anglican-looking Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, located in Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka.
The very Anglican-looking Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, located in Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka

Although Sri Lanka achieved its independence in 1948, there remain many hints of its colonial past, such as this church, built in 1899 by tea growers. The gravestones bear the English names of the plantation owners and their families.

Four excellent guesses were sent in, but no correct answers were received by the deadline. DAVID PATTEN of Saint Petersburg, Florida, who sent us the photo, wins the prize for stumping the readers.
Holy Trinity Church and its graveyard, Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka

“Dromeas,” aka “The Runner,” in Athens, Greece

April 2011 Issue

“Dromeas,” aka “The Runner,” in Athens, Greece


Dromeas
Heart of glass… and head, arms, legs, etc. The subject of February’s photo is “Dromeas,” aka “The Runner,” a 30-foot-tall sculpture of glass stacked on iron by Kostas Varotsos.

Commissioned by the City of Athens, Greece, and built from 1988 to 1994, it was displayed in Omonia Square before concerns about vibrations from the metro beneath it encouraged city officials to move it to its present site in front of the Hilton Athens on Vassi­lissis Sofias Avenue.

Fifty-seven readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and BRIAN SANDS of New Orleans, Louisiana, won the drawing.

We thank Donald Schrock of Morton, Illinois, for contributing the photo.

March 2011 Issue

Trakošćan Castle, northern Croatia


Trakošćan Castle, near Krapina in northern Croatia
From business to pleasure… January’s photo depicts Trakošćan Castle, near Krapina in northern Croatia. Built more than seven centuries ago as an observation fortress to monitor the road from Ptuj to Bednja Valley, it underwent numerous changes of ownership and purpose and was restored in the 19th century in the Romantic tradition as a manor house surrounded by pleasure grounds.

No correct answers were sent in by the deadline, so for submitting a photo that stumped our readers, PATRICIA MINAMI of Rockville, Maryland, collects the prize.
Trakošćan Castle, northern Croatia

Minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.

February 2011 Issue

Minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.


A minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.

December’s photo was a real stumper. It depicts a minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.

Tunisia’s sixth-largest city, coastal Gabès is largely an industrial center; gas and oil wells are situated offshore, and cement and chemicals are manufactured there. Even so, Gabès is known for its traditional souks and is being considered for a spot on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List.

No guesses (correct or otherwise) were received by the deadline, so, for stumping our readers, the contributor of the photo, David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, is this month's winner of a year’s subscription to ITN.

January 2011 Issue

Plaque for Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway


 The plaque for the Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway

"What I did on my summer vacation." How about "Helped design a monument at 71º north latitude"?

November’s photo depicts the plaque for the Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway.

In June 1988, children from seven countries (Tanzania, Japan, Brazil, Thailand, Italy, the USSR and the USA) spent a week together on the island — which in the summer is also home to nomadic Sami herdsmen and some 4,000 to 5,000 reindeer — and celebrated their stay by each designing a plaque.

The monument comprises seven circular, freestanding plaques plus this one which shows them all and describes the project. The monument is “a symbol of cooperation, friendship, hope and joy.”

Twenty-three correct answers were sent in by the deadline, and NORMAN BENTON of Creswell, Oregon, won the drawing. We thank Carolyn Casperson of Banning, California, for contributing the photo.
Plaque for Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway

Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Parnell, New Zealand

December 2010 Issue

Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Parnell, New Zealand



To a seasoned traveler, a cathedral is a familiar sight, but the church that is the setting for October’s photo boasts an architectural style found nowhere else in the world.

The photo depicts the west window in the Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Parnell, a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand.

The modern stained-glass design portrays the risen Christ — a Polynesian risen Christ — surrounded by vividly colored Pacific motifs. (To see the colors, click the image to see the larger version.)

The cathedral, consecrated in 1888, has been described as “the world’s only example of the ‘Pacific Gothic’ style.”

One correct answer was received by the deadline, so CHAD PUTHOFF of Cookeville, Tennessee, is the winner. We thank Fred Lokay of Williamsburg, Virginia, for contributing the photo.