Where in the World Archives

“Dromeas,” aka “The Runner,” in Athens, Greece

April 2011 Issue

“Dromeas,” aka “The Runner,” in Athens, Greece


Dromeas
Heart of glass… and head, arms, legs, etc. The subject of February’s photo is “Dromeas,” aka “The Runner,” a 30-foot-tall sculpture of glass stacked on iron by Kostas Varotsos.

Commissioned by the City of Athens, Greece, and built from 1988 to 1994, it was displayed in Omonia Square before concerns about vibrations from the metro beneath it encouraged city officials to move it to its present site in front of the Hilton Athens on Vassi­lissis Sofias Avenue.

Fifty-seven readers sent in correct answers by the deadline, and BRIAN SANDS of New Orleans, Louisiana, won the drawing.

We thank Donald Schrock of Morton, Illinois, for contributing the photo.

March 2011 Issue

Trakošćan Castle, northern Croatia


Trakošćan Castle, near Krapina in northern Croatia
From business to pleasure… January’s photo depicts Trakošćan Castle, near Krapina in northern Croatia. Built more than seven centuries ago as an observation fortress to monitor the road from Ptuj to Bednja Valley, it underwent numerous changes of ownership and purpose and was restored in the 19th century in the Romantic tradition as a manor house surrounded by pleasure grounds.

No correct answers were sent in by the deadline, so for submitting a photo that stumped our readers, PATRICIA MINAMI of Rockville, Maryland, collects the prize.
Trakošćan Castle, northern Croatia

Minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.

February 2011 Issue

Minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.


A minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.

December’s photo was a real stumper. It depicts a minaret of the Great Mosque in Gabès, southern Tunisia.

Tunisia’s sixth-largest city, coastal Gabès is largely an industrial center; gas and oil wells are situated offshore, and cement and chemicals are manufactured there. Even so, Gabès is known for its traditional souks and is being considered for a spot on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List.

No guesses (correct or otherwise) were received by the deadline, so, for stumping our readers, the contributor of the photo, David J. Patten of St. Petersburg, Florida, is this month's winner of a year’s subscription to ITN.

January 2011 Issue

Plaque for Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway


 The plaque for the Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway

"What I did on my summer vacation." How about "Helped design a monument at 71º north latitude"?

November’s photo depicts the plaque for the Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway.

In June 1988, children from seven countries (Tanzania, Japan, Brazil, Thailand, Italy, the USSR and the USA) spent a week together on the island — which in the summer is also home to nomadic Sami herdsmen and some 4,000 to 5,000 reindeer — and celebrated their stay by each designing a plaque.

The monument comprises seven circular, freestanding plaques plus this one which shows them all and describes the project. The monument is “a symbol of cooperation, friendship, hope and joy.”

Twenty-three correct answers were sent in by the deadline, and NORMAN BENTON of Creswell, Oregon, won the drawing. We thank Carolyn Casperson of Banning, California, for contributing the photo.
Plaque for Children of the Earth monument at North Cape on Magerøya Island, Norway

Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Parnell, New Zealand

December 2010 Issue

Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Parnell, New Zealand



To a seasoned traveler, a cathedral is a familiar sight, but the church that is the setting for October’s photo boasts an architectural style found nowhere else in the world.

The photo depicts the west window in the Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Parnell, a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand.

The modern stained-glass design portrays the risen Christ — a Polynesian risen Christ — surrounded by vividly colored Pacific motifs. (To see the colors, click the image to see the larger version.)

The cathedral, consecrated in 1888, has been described as “the world’s only example of the ‘Pacific Gothic’ style.”

One correct answer was received by the deadline, so CHAD PUTHOFF of Cookeville, Tennessee, is the winner. We thank Fred Lokay of Williamsburg, Virginia, for contributing the photo.

November 2010 Issue

“Make Way for Ducklings," Moscow, Russia






Go east, young ducks! September’s photo depicts the sculpture “Make Way for Ducklings” by Nancy Schön, based on the popular children’s book by Robert McCloskey. The copy of the sculpture in the photo is located in Novodevichy Park, Moscow, Russia. It was a gift from Barbara Bush to Raisa Gorbechev for "the children of Moscow” in 1991. The original is in the Boston Public Gardens, one of the settings in the story (and, based on the many, many “Boston” answers ITN received, a favorite US destination for our readers).



Fifty-five correct answers were sent in by the deadline, and ADAM PAUL of Liberty, Maine, won the drawing. We thank Colleen Simon of Villa Park, California, for contributing the photo.
“Make Way for Ducklings," Moscow, Russia

Grundtvigs Kirke in Copenhagen, Denmark

October 2010 Issue

Grundtvigs Kirke in Copenhagen, Denmark



The photo in the August issue depicts Grundtvigs Kirke in Copenhagen, Denmark, built 1921 to 1940 in honor of Danish clergyman, philosopher, author and composer Nicolai Frederik Severin Grundtvig (1783-1872).

Grundtvig must have taken to heart the exhortation in Psalms to “make a joyful noise unto the Lord”; he wrote 1,500 hymns, many of which are sung to this day. With Grundtvig’s musical gifts in mind, the church was designed to resemble a pipe organ.

Thirty-eight correct entries were sent in by the deadline, and ANNETTE SPEARS of Peoria, Arizona, won the drawing.

We thank Tom DeClaire of Webster, New York, for contributing the photo.

September 2010 Issue

Christchurch Arts Centre in Christchurch, New Zealand



You really have to be walking on air to live in this house. July’s photo depicts “Echo,” a three-dimensional sculpture of black fiberglass tubes installed over the Christchurch Arts Centre in Christchurch, New Zealand, by Ned Dawson in 1981. The “floating” house is suspended 26 feet above the building by thin wires.

Nine correct entries were sent in by the deadline, and ALAN LICHTENSTEIN of Commack, New York, won the drawing. We thank Lorenz Rychner of Denver, Colorado, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers to the puzzle were sent in by the following readers:

Patricia Daniloff, Coarsegold, CA; Donald Gillies, Santa Barbara, CA; Carol Horner, Lacy, WA; Patrick Kulisheck, Minneapolis, MN; Martha Lawlor, Georgetown, TX; WINNER: Alan Lichtenstein, Commack, NY; Janet Roubian, San Francisco, CA; Jo Ellen Ryan, Davis, CA, and Linda Williamson, Boise, ID.
Christchurch Arts Centre in Christchurch, New Zealand

Giant Swing near entrance to Wat Suthat in Bangkok, Thailand

August 2010 Issue

Giant Swing near entrance to Wat Suthat in Bangkok, Thailand


The Giant Swing near the entrance to Wat Suthat in Bangkok, Thailand

The photo in the June issue depicts the Giant Swing near the entrance to Wat Suthat in Bangkok, Thailand. The current structure is a replica of the original swing, built in 1784, which stood until 2006. (Timbers of the original swing are preserved in Bangkok’s National Museum.) In a ceremony that symbolically reenacted elements of the Hindu creation myth, monks would swing from the 80-foot-tall structure and attempt to grab a bag of coins atop one of the pillars. The ritual was halted in 1935 after several fatal accidents.

Thirteen correct entries were sent in by the deadline, and TASSANEE LEE of Seal Beach, California, won the drawing. We thank Mark Varnau of Indianapolis, Indiana, for contributing the photo.

Correct answers to the puzzle were sent in by the following readers:

Bruce Croft, Henderson, NV; Thomas DeClaire, Webster, NY; Joyce Gad, Cary, NC; John Haseman, Grand Junction, CO; Ron Hess, O'Fallon, MO; Pauline Ho, Albuquerque, NM; Lloyd Lapidow, Leivittown, NY; Kathie Larsen, Seattle, WA; WINNER: Tassanee Lee, Seal Beach, CA; Sondra Markman, Edison, NJ; John McAuliffe, Silverdale, WA; Patara Sinhaseni, Bangkok, Thailand, and Edith Speir, Annandale, VA.

July 2010 Issue

Penitentiary at Port Arthur, Tasmania



From 1787 to 1868, more than 160,000 prisoners were transported from Britain to Australia. Once they reached Australia, anyone who reoffended was sent to the subject of May’s photo, the Penitentiary at Port Arthur, Tasmania. It was nearly an “inescapable” prison.

One convict, George Hunt, famously attempted to gain his freedom by disguising himself as a kangaroo, only to throw off the pelt and give himself up when hungry guards tried to shoot him for dinner.

Thirty-four correct entries were sent by the deadline, and JACK ORR of Hot Springs, Arkansas, won the drawing. We thank Grace Newman of Ponte Vedra, Florida, for contributing the photo.
Penitentiary at Port Arthur, Tasmania