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A bridge over a canal in Venice, Italy.

Dear Globetrotter:

Welcome to the 524th issue of your monthly foreign-travel magazine, the publication mostly written by its subscribers, people who find travel very rewarding. ITN also stands out from other travel publications because it only covers destinations outside of the United States and its territories. It’s for people not afraid to step out of their comfort zone.

If you’re just back from a trip and would like to share a discovery, a lesson learned...

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Chef Dwayne of <b><i>Ciao Jamaica</i></b> with a plate of Jamaican Goat Curry — Negril. Photos by Sandra Scott

In March I needed to get away from the cold and snow of Upstate New York, so I flew to Jamaica and stayed at the SamSara Cliff Resort (West End Road, Negril, Jamaica; phone, in the US, 876/957-4395 or 315/307-4395, negrilhotels.com).

The hotel is a couple hours from Montego Bay’s Sangster International Airport, but the hotel provides transportation for $87 one way.

The hotel is located on low cliffs, with several flights of steps down to or into the water. Guests enjoyed...

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Travelers can hop on and off Germany’s sleek InterCity Express trains easily with either a Eurail Global Pass or a German Rail Pass. Photo by Rick Steves

Once an economical and easy way to allow travel around Europe, railpasses over the years had become more of a headache-inducing puzzle. But in 2019, Europe’s railpasses underwent some sweeping changes that have made them an affordable option again and much less confusing to shop for, making me nostalgic for their glory days.

As of this year, “Select Passes” — where you could mix and match countries as you liked to suit your itinerary — are gone....

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Stone banquette with carvings of warriors and priests — Templo Mayor Museum, Mexico City. Photos by Julie Skurdenis

There is an old adage that “all roads lead to Rome.” It’s a statement with much truth in it, since most, if not all, roads in the early centuries of the Christian era did lead to Rome, then the center of a vast, far-flung empire.

The same adage could be applied to 14th-century Tenochtitlán, then the center of the Aztec empire in Mesoamerica. All roads seemed to lead to Tenochtitlán. Or at least they did from AD 1325 to 1521.

Before then, the Aztecs...

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In China, more than 92 million people share the family name Li, but those with the family name Wang number 92.8 million, or about 6.6% of the population.

Travelers can hop on and off Germany’s sleek InterCity Express trains easily with either a Eurail Global Pass or a German Rail Pass.

Once an economical and easy way to travel around Europe, rail passes over the years had become more of a headache-inducing puzzle. But in 2019, Europe's rail passes underwent some sweeping changes that have made them an affordable option again, and much less confusing to shop for -- and made me nostalgic for their glory days.

As of this year, "Select Passes" -- where you could mix and match countries as you like to suit your itinerary -- are gone....

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According to tradition, the colors of these Maltese fishing boats represent a fisherman’s home village. CREDIT: Gretchen Strauch, Rick Steves’ Europe.

Sailing into the stony harbor of the island of Malta, surrounded by ramparts and turrets, you realize that this strategic and much fought-over rock midway between Sicily and Africa has had a long and difficult history. But its parade of foreign rulers (Phoenician, Roman, Greek, Arab, Norman, Sicilian and British -- to name a few) make it a fascinating place to explore today.

The imposing capital city of Valletta is a monument to this hard-...

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A walk along Dublin’s O’Connell Street median is filled with history, though the 400-foot spike in the center — called The Spire — is a memorial to nothing.

A walk through the heart of north Dublin recalls Ireland's long fight for independence, and makes a fine introduction to the historical lay of the land.

Start at the O'Connell Bridge, which spans the River Liffey. The river has long divided the wealthy south side of town from the working-class north side. From the bridge, you can see modern Dublin evolving: A forest of cranes marks building sites all over town.

Leading from the...

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