Anyone been to Machu Picchu in June - weather????

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<p>I'm planning a trip to Peru/Ecuador for most of the month of June and I'm wondering about the weather. I see that the average is 2" of rain for June.<br /> I'll be up in the Andes and don't want to trudge thru snow or have freezing temps.<br /> Any info appreciated.<br /> Thanks </p>

According to Fodor's World Weather Guide (our Bible when scheduling trips), Cuzco gets two tenths of an inch of precipitation in June and the average number of wet days is 2 for the entire month. We spent 2 1/2 or 3 weeks in Peru in late May, early June and the weather was gloriously perfect every day. June, July and August are also the best months to visit Ecuador.

Many years ago I spent several days in Cuzco and Machu Picchu during May
and the weather was cool but very pleasant. I wore an alpaca cardigan that I bought locally and it was fine.
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Moderator note: posts combined

My trip was in May.

Thank you for your replies. Sounds like a picked a good time to go.
Now I am concerned about altitude sickness - any ideas on how to overcome that. I'll be on a tour and don't know that I will have the time to acclimate as I may need to.
Thanks

My doctor has given me a prescription for Diamox, a drug primarily used for glaucoma as I recall, but also effective at combating altitude sickness. It's worked well for me in Tibet, Bhutan, Bolivia, and elsewhere. (I didn't know about it when I went to Peru.) The only side-effect I noticed is some tingling in the hands and fingers, which has gone away after a day or two.
People react to altitude differently, so I can't know if I should thank Diamox or my genes for the fact that altitude hasn't bothered me. But I'll continue to take the pills when at altitude.
So I have two suggestions for you: first, consult your doctor or a travel medicine clinic if there's one near you; and second, try the coca tea when you get to Peru. If Peruvians and Bolivians have used it for generations, it probably does some good. Oh, and take it easy for the first day or so if you possibly can.
Hope this helps.