Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, September 2016 -- Page 54

I’ve always felt that taxis are underrated, scenic time-savers that can zip you effortlessly from one sight to the next… except during rush-hour traffic, when they’re stuck like everyone else. 

In the past, cabs were expensive for a lone budget traveler but a good deal for a group of three or four. Now, with the advent of ride-sharing services like Uber, there are more deals than ever for getting around European cities.

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, August 2016 -- Page 55

After spending 30-plus springs and summers in Europe, it seems to me that, more and more, the culture is celebrated outdoors. Cities and towns everywhere are competing to attract visitors, and there is more than enough music, drink, theater and fun to keep these concerts and festivals going and growing. 

Make a point in your travels to enjoy the scene outdoors… by day and by night. Here are a few random examples of how to put this cultural sparkle into your next trip....

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, July 2016 -- Page 53

Eating in Europe is about more than just the food. The best dining experiences are sensory, where you’re not only eating tasty cuisine, you’re enjoying the patina of age, the colorful clientele and their chatter and the crunchy sound of knives cutting through freshly baked loaves of bread. 

After years of travel, I’ve found that just as important as museums and churches is experiencing culture through the hearth, through the kitchen and through the dining room...

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, June 2016 -- Page 0

In my quest to experience Europe as the locals do — intimately and on all fronts — I make it a point to eat well. My trip is always the better for it. (My challenge is broadening my perspective while leaving my waistline unchanged.)

These days, my job of eating well is getting easier all the time. Food tours and cooking classes have become a big deal all over Europe.

Most food tours have lunch or dinner versions, last about three hours, come with a...

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, May 2016 -- Page 55

Pablo Picasso was the most famous and — OK, I’ll say it — greatest artist of the 20th century. Before he was 30, Picasso had revolutionized the art world. And that was just the beginning.

A Spanish expatriate, cocreator of Cubism and devoted womanizer, Picasso left an amazing legacy in his wake. In the course of his long life (he died in 1973 at 91), Picasso moved from Spain to Paris to the south of France. Every locale that he called home has claimed him as a native...

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, April 2016 -- Page 53

In the Eastern Mediterranean, Greece, Croatia and Turkey remain popular with tourists and present some important transportation and sightseeing changes for 2016.

GREECE is one of Europe’s great destinations, but concern about its financial crisis and the thousands of Syrian refugees entering the country is impacting travelers’ vacation plans. While the country is digging out of a massive economic hole (and I wouldn’t want to be a Greek worker counting on a...

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, March 2016 -- Page 53

FRANCE has brought us so much culture and art and, at the same time, has championed the modern concept of a vacation. To get the most out of your next visit, be mindful of these changes and developments for 2016.

• In Paris, the Eiffel Tower’s first level — after a $38 million renovation — is decked out with new shops, eateries and a multimedia presentation about the tower’s construction, paint job, place in pop culture and more. The highlight is the breathtaking, vertigo-inducing...

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Rick Steves' Europe
This article appears in our Print Edition, January 2016 -- Page 52

For the past 30-plus years, whenever I’ve been asked to state my occupation at a border crossing, I’ve said, “Teacher.” People may find my TV shows to be entertaining or my guidebooks practical, but my passion has always been to teach, whether it’s about art, culture or nuts-and-bolts travel skills. My fundamental cause is that good travel teaches people to better understand the world they live in.

In order to be a good teacher, I need to be a good student. That’s why I frequently...

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