Deadly Sudan protests

This item appears on page 5 of the January 2022 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

If you would like to read an issue from the archives that is free to nonsubscribers click here.

Soldiers fired on protesters in Khartoum, Sudan, on Nov. 17, killing at least 10 people and wounding dozens of others. Many thousands of people had joined the protest against the military-appointed government that took power after a coup on Oct. 25. Since that date, there have been almost daily protests, many resulting in the military’s firing on civilians. Protests continued at press time.

On Nov. 21, Abdalla Hamdok, who had been the prime minister of the transitional government before being deposed by the military and arrested, was released from prison and reinstated to his former position, after which he announced a power-sharing deal with the military that he said will lead to democratic elections by July 2023. However, members of the civilian-led part of the former government rejected the terms, saying Hamdok had signed them under duress.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Soldiers fired on protesters in Khartoum, Sudan, on Nov. 17, killing at least 10 people and wounding dozens of others. Many thousands of people had joined the protest against the military-appointed government that took power after a coup on Oct. 25. Since that date, there have been almost daily protests, many resulting in the military’s firing on civilians. Protests continued at press time.

On Nov. 21, Abdalla Hamdok, who had been the prime minister of the transitional government before being deposed by the military and arrested, was released from prison and reinstated to his former position, after which he announced a power-sharing deal with the military that he said will lead to democratic elections by July 2023. However, members of the civilian-led part of the former government rejected the terms, saying Hamdok had signed them under duress.