Southern historic route

By Gene McPherson
This item appears on page 26 of the October 2021 issue.
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Stretching from Natchez, Mississippi, on the Mississippi River, northeast to Nashville, Tennessee, the Natchez Trace Parkway is a wonderful road maintained by the National Park Service.

Based on an ancient trail, its earliest users were buffalo, then Native Americans and then white settlers. Today it is a paved highway closed to commercial vehicles but open to other vehicles and bikers. There is no separate bike trail, but the traffic speed limit is 45. My wife, Barbara, and I drove some of it in 2020.

Cutting through Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee, it’s historic and scenic, and it’s a part of the National Park Service.

GENE McPHERSON
Sturgis, SD


ITN is temporarily accepting brief write-ups about the US. Information on independent travel, cultural and traditional sites and sources of handmade crafts plus little-known natural wonders are welcome. Avoid touting commercial theme parks, casinos or highly publicized touristy sites.

Email editor@intltravelnews.com or write to Travelers’ Intercom USA, c/o ITN, 2122 28th St., Sacramento, CA 95818.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Stretching from Natchez, Mississippi, on the Mississippi River, northeast to Nashville, Tennessee, the Natchez Trace Parkway is a wonderful road maintained by the National Park Service.

Based on an ancient trail, its earliest users were buffalo, then Native Americans and then white settlers. Today it is a paved highway closed to commercial vehicles but open to other vehicles and bikers. There is no separate bike trail, but the traffic speed limit is 45. My wife, Barbara, and I drove some of it in 2020.

Cutting through Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee, it’s historic and scenic, and it’s a part of the National Park Service.

GENE McPHERSON
Sturgis, SD


ITN is temporarily accepting brief write-ups about the US. Information on independent travel, cultural and traditional sites and sources of handmade crafts plus little-known natural wonders are welcome. Avoid touting commercial theme parks, casinos or highly publicized touristy sites.

Email editor@intltravelnews.com or write to Travelers’ Intercom USA, c/o ITN, 2122 28th St., Sacramento, CA 95818.