Petroglyph trail in NW Australia

This item appears on page 35 of the March 2021 issue.
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At Murujuga National Park, on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, a new half-mile trail culminates at an elevated boardwalk that gives trekkers a close-up look at a group of petroglyphs (rock art) dating back 47,000 years.

The glyphs contain representations of humans and multiple extinct species of animals once present in Australia. Signage interprets the images and explains their significance.

Murujuga is maintained by the Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation, a collective of four Traditional Custodian groups that still live in the area: the Yindjibarndi, Yaburara, Mardudhunera and Woon-goo-tt-oo peoples. For info on the park and its history, visit parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/park/murujuga.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

At Murujuga National Park, on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, a new half-mile trail culminates at an elevated boardwalk that gives trekkers a close-up look at a group of petroglyphs (rock art) dating back 47,000 years.

The glyphs contain representations of humans and multiple extinct species of animals once present in Australia. Signage interprets the images and explains their significance.

Murujuga is maintained by the Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation, a collective of four Traditional Custodian groups that still live in the area: the Yindjibarndi, Yaburara, Mardudhunera and Woon-goo-tt-oo peoples. For info on the park and its history, visit parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/park/murujuga.