La Statue de Sainte-Genevieve (Paris, France)

La Statue de Sainte-Genevieve (Paris, France)

October 2021 Issue

La Statue de Sainte-Genevieve (Paris, France)


The story behind the statue in our August mystery photo begins with a woman named Geneviève. She was born in Nanterre, France, circa 423 and later moved to Paris. She was a young woman when Parisians feared an invasion by Attila the Hun. Genevieve refused to flee and urged others to remain in the city and pray. When Attila bypassed Paris, people believed a miracle had occurred. Geneviève was later declared the patroness saint of Paris.

In 1928, the 18-foot-tall La Statue de Sainte-Geneviève (atop a 46-foot-tall base) was built on the Pont de la Tournelle bridge, spanning the Seine in Paris. Sculptor Paul Landowski had wanted the statue to face west toward Notre Dame, but city officials preferred that it face the opposite direction, toward the enemy troops that never arrived.

Seventeen correct answers were submitted naming the location in the picture, and WILLIS FRICK of San Clemente, California, won the drawing. We thank Gordon Kitchens of Atlanta, Georgia, for submitting the photo.

Correct answers were submitted by:

Peter Beuret, Santa Barbara, CA; Cathy Briner, Eugene, OR; Mary Carlson, Mission Viejo, CA; Maria Cueto, Weehawken, NJ; WINNER: Willis Frick, San Clemente, CA; Sylvie Gould, Cumming, GA; Signe Haugen, San Carlos, CA; Jane & Clyde Holt, Hinesburg, VT; Karyn Kandell, Kyoto, Japan; Robin Parker, Little Rock, AR; Raymond Prince, Maple Valley, WA; Paula Prindle, Orient, OH; Lenny Lianne Resch, Peoria, AZ; Jean Schroeder, Redding, CT; Jennifer Schultz, Northbrook, IL; Jonathan van Bilsen, Port Perry, ON, Canada; Catherine Vernon, Osprey, FL.