Australia park changes

This item appears on page 30 of the May 2021 issue.
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In Far North Queensland, Australia, in March, the Tip at Cape York (called Pajinka by the Aborigines who live there) was closed by the Traditional Owners, Gudang/Yahaykenu Aboriginal Corporation, due to visitor misbehavior and vandalism.

Pajinka is the country’s northernmost continental point of land. A week after the closure, on March 25, the chairman of the corporation agreed to a deal that would reopen Cape York to visitors, but each would be charged a fee of AUD10 (near $8).

Traditional Owners at another site, Kakadu National Park, have also threatened to close their park to visitors due to a dispute over upkeep of the land. Four of Kakadu’s attractions, including the Warradjan Aboriginal Cultural Centre, have been closed for more than a year due to maintenance issues.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In Far North Queensland, Australia, in March, the Tip at Cape York (called Pajinka by the Aborigines who live there) was closed by the Traditional Owners, Gudang/Yahaykenu Aboriginal Corporation, due to visitor misbehavior and vandalism.

Pajinka is the country’s northernmost continental point of land. A week after the closure, on March 25, the chairman of the corporation agreed to a deal that would reopen Cape York to visitors, but each would be charged a fee of AUD10 (near $8).

Traditional Owners at another site, Kakadu National Park, have also threatened to close their park to visitors due to a dispute over upkeep of the land. Four of Kakadu’s attractions, including the Warradjan Aboriginal Cultural Centre, have been closed for more than a year due to maintenance issues.