Protests in Chile

This item appears on page 18 of the January 2020 issue.
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Antigovernment protests in Chile, starting in early October 2019 after a proposed increase in public transportation fares, were ongoing at press time despite that proposal’s being rescinded. During the protests, at least 24 people were killed and more than 2,300 were injured, leading Chile’s president, Sebastián Piñera, to admit that security forces had committed “abuses” against protesters.

On Nov. 15, the Chilean government announced that the country would hold a referendum in April 2020 to decide whether or not to replace the nation’s constitution (which dates back to 1980, during the regime of Augusto Pinochet) and, if so, what body of officials shall be responsible for writing the new constitution.

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Antigovernment protests in Chile, starting in early October 2019 after a proposed increase in public transportation fares, were ongoing at press time despite that proposal’s being rescinded. During the protests, at least 24 people were killed and more than 2,300 were injured, leading Chile’s president, Sebastián Piñera, to admit that security forces had committed “abuses” against protesters.

On Nov. 15, the Chilean government announced that the country would hold a referendum in April 2020 to decide whether or not to replace the nation’s constitution (which dates back to 1980, during the regime of Augusto Pinochet) and, if so, what body of officials shall be responsible for writing the new constitution.