Countries reopening

This item appears on page 5 of the July 2020 issue.
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At press time, ITN could confirm that the countries listed below had reopened their borders to foreign travelers or had scheduled reopenings. This list may not be complete. Travel restrictions have been included here in each case, if known. Note that, though a country’s borders may have opened to travelers, flights may not yet be available from the US.

(Note: For updated information on border and travel restrictions worldwide, see the “Interactive Coronavirus [COVID-19] Travel Regulations Map,” managed by the International Air Transport Association, at www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm and click on any country or territory.)

 

• On May 15, Slovenia opened its borders to all European Union (EU) citizens, the first country on the Continent to reopen to regular travelers. Depending on the infection rate of their home country, some travelers will be required to observe a 14-day quarantine after entering Slovenia. Non-EU citizens still could not enter as of press time.

• On June 1, Montenegro opened its borders to travelers from countries where the active COVID-19 infection rate is less than 25 per 100,000 people. (For reference, the active case rate in the US was about 230 per 100,000 people at press time.

Italy was scheduled to open its borders on June 3 to travelers from the EU, Switzerland and the UK. All people in Italy must wear a mask when on public transport or in an enclosed public space. A decision on travel to Italy by non-Europeans was expected around June 14.

• The foreign minister of Portugal stated in late May that travelers arriving in the country by air will not face any quarantine but will be required to submit to “minimal health controls.” TAP Air Portugal confirmed that flights from North America to Portugal were scheduled to recommence, starting June 4, from Newark Liberty International Airport.

• The island of Antigua was scheduled to begin allowing travelers from the US on June 4. Each traveler must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival. At press time, there was no tourism infrastructure on the neighboring island of Barbuda due to the island having been completely depopulated after Hurricane Irma in 2018.

• The Caribbean nation of St. Lucia was scheduled to reopen to foreign travelers on June 4. Upon arrival, foreigners must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test administered within the last 48 hours. At press time, only flights from the US were allowed to land at the country’s airport.

Cyprus was scheduled to reopen its borders on June 9 to travelers coming from selected low- and mid-risk countries, primarily in the EU. Travelers arriving in Cyprus must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the last 72 hours. As an incentive for travelers, the Cypriot government said it would pay for any “accommodation, medication or food costs for the patients and families” of anyone who contracts COVID-19 while visiting Cyprus.

Iceland was scheduled to reopen its borders to foreign travelers on June 15. To enter, travelers have the option of bringing proof of a negative COVID-19 test, taking a test at the airport or spending 14 days in quarantine.

Belgium has scheduled the reopening of its borders to foreign travelers for June 15.

Greece was scheduled to reopen its borders to travelers from “approved countries” on June 15, pending COVID-19 tests done on arrival. Visitors will also be subject to health and safety protocols while in the country. Those traveling to Greece from within the EU may not be subject to all restrictions. International flights initially will only be allowed to arrive in or depart from Athens, but other airports were expected to begin accepting flights on July 1.

• The Dutch Caribbean island of Aruba announced that it would open its borders sometime between June 15 and July 1. No restrictions for travelers had been announced at press time.

Spain was scheduled to open its borders to foreign travelers on July 1. No restrictions for travelers had been announced.

• The Portuguese island of Madeira was scheduled to open for foreign travelers on July 1. Anyone traveling to Madeira must either show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the last 72 hours or be tested at the airport on arrival.

• The Maldives, an archipelago country in the Indian Ocean, was scheduled to open to travelers on July 1. Each visitor must be approved for a $100 tourist visa in advance, formerly available on arrival. In order to qualify for the visa, a traveler must submit proof of having arranged for at least 14 days of lodging and of having full-coverage travel insurance. Each visitor must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test, or a positive test for COVID-19 antibodies, taken within a week of arrival.

The Bahamas expected to open its borders to foreign travelers by July 1. No restrictions for travelers had been announced at press time.

• The British Caribbean territory Turks & Caicos is scheduled to open their borders to travelers on July 22. Incoming flights will be limited to those from the US, Canada and Europe. The territory’s cruise terminal will remain closed until at least Aug. 31.

Mexico will open its borders on a state-by-state basis, depending on the level of infection in each state. Some states were expected to open by mid-June. However, the US extended its ban on nonessential travel to Mexico until at least June 22.

 

The following countries have not closed their borders, but foreigners will face increased restrictions if traveling there.

The United Kingdom, including England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, continues to be open to foreign travelers. All travelers must submit to a mandatory 14-day quarantine upon arrival.

• The Republic of Ireland remains open to foreign travelers. Anyone arriving in Ireland, including those crossing the border from Northern Ireland, must submit to a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

The Netherlands’ land borders remain open to those traveling within the Schengen Zone, but arrival by plane is limited to Dutch citizens and essential workers. However, someone crossing a land border using a passport from a non-EU country may be denied entry.

• The US government has banned travel to and from Canada until at least June 22 and has banned travel to and from Brazil indefinitely.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

At press time, ITN could confirm that the countries listed below had reopened their borders to foreign travelers or had scheduled reopenings. This list may not be complete. Travel restrictions have been included here in each case, if known. Note that, though a country’s borders may have opened to travelers, flights may not yet be available from the US.

(Note: For updated information on border and travel restrictions worldwide, see the “Interactive Coronavirus [COVID-19] Travel Regulations Map,” managed by the International Air Transport Association, at www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm and click on any country or territory.)

 

• On May 15, Slovenia opened its borders to all European Union (EU) citizens, the first country on the Continent to reopen to regular travelers. Depending on the infection rate of their home country, some travelers will be required to observe a 14-day quarantine after entering Slovenia. Non-EU citizens still could not enter as of press time.

• On June 1, Montenegro opened its borders to travelers from countries where the active COVID-19 infection rate is less than 25 per 100,000 people. (For reference, the active case rate in the US was about 230 per 100,000 people at press time.

Italy was scheduled to open its borders on June 3 to travelers from the EU, Switzerland and the UK. All people in Italy must wear a mask when on public transport or in an enclosed public space. A decision on travel to Italy by non-Europeans was expected around June 14.

• The foreign minister of Portugal stated in late May that travelers arriving in the country by air will not face any quarantine but will be required to submit to “minimal health controls.” TAP Air Portugal confirmed that flights from North America to Portugal were scheduled to recommence, starting June 4, from Newark Liberty International Airport.

• The island of Antigua was scheduled to begin allowing travelers from the US on June 4. Each traveler must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival. At press time, there was no tourism infrastructure on the neighboring island of Barbuda due to the island having been completely depopulated after Hurricane Irma in 2018.

• The Caribbean nation of St. Lucia was scheduled to reopen to foreign travelers on June 4. Upon arrival, foreigners must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test administered within the last 48 hours. At press time, only flights from the US were allowed to land at the country’s airport.

Cyprus was scheduled to reopen its borders on June 9 to travelers coming from selected low- and mid-risk countries, primarily in the EU. Travelers arriving in Cyprus must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the last 72 hours. As an incentive for travelers, the Cypriot government said it would pay for any “accommodation, medication or food costs for the patients and families” of anyone who contracts COVID-19 while visiting Cyprus.

Iceland was scheduled to reopen its borders to foreign travelers on June 15. To enter, travelers have the option of bringing proof of a negative COVID-19 test, taking a test at the airport or spending 14 days in quarantine.

Belgium has scheduled the reopening of its borders to foreign travelers for June 15.

Greece was scheduled to reopen its borders to travelers from “approved countries” on June 15, pending COVID-19 tests done on arrival. Visitors will also be subject to health and safety protocols while in the country. Those traveling to Greece from within the EU may not be subject to all restrictions. International flights initially will only be allowed to arrive in or depart from Athens, but other airports were expected to begin accepting flights on July 1.

• The Dutch Caribbean island of Aruba announced that it would open its borders sometime between June 15 and July 1. No restrictions for travelers had been announced at press time.

Spain was scheduled to open its borders to foreign travelers on July 1. No restrictions for travelers had been announced.

• The Portuguese island of Madeira was scheduled to open for foreign travelers on July 1. Anyone traveling to Madeira must either show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the last 72 hours or be tested at the airport on arrival.

• The Maldives, an archipelago country in the Indian Ocean, was scheduled to open to travelers on July 1. Each visitor must be approved for a $100 tourist visa in advance, formerly available on arrival. In order to qualify for the visa, a traveler must submit proof of having arranged for at least 14 days of lodging and of having full-coverage travel insurance. Each visitor must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test, or a positive test for COVID-19 antibodies, taken within a week of arrival.

The Bahamas expected to open its borders to foreign travelers by July 1. No restrictions for travelers had been announced at press time.

• The British Caribbean territory Turks & Caicos is scheduled to open their borders to travelers on July 22. Incoming flights will be limited to those from the US, Canada and Europe. The territory’s cruise terminal will remain closed until at least Aug. 31.

Mexico will open its borders on a state-by-state basis, depending on the level of infection in each state. Some states were expected to open by mid-June. However, the US extended its ban on nonessential travel to Mexico until at least June 22.

 

The following countries have not closed their borders, but foreigners will face increased restrictions if traveling there.

The United Kingdom, including England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, continues to be open to foreign travelers. All travelers must submit to a mandatory 14-day quarantine upon arrival.

• The Republic of Ireland remains open to foreign travelers. Anyone arriving in Ireland, including those crossing the border from Northern Ireland, must submit to a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

The Netherlands’ land borders remain open to those traveling within the Schengen Zone, but arrival by plane is limited to Dutch citizens and essential workers. However, someone crossing a land border using a passport from a non-EU country may be denied entry.

• The US government has banned travel to and from Canada until at least June 22 and has banned travel to and from Brazil indefinitely.