Motion sickness medication reminder

By Rod Smith
This item appears on page 15 of the August 2019 issue.
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Before we left Ushuaia, Argentina, for our expedition-ship cruise to Antarctica in December 2018, our guide Sebastian held a meeting with our group of 23. By that time, he had already made this trip many times, but he shared an experience with us that had occurred on his first trip.

The first night on the ship, his phone rang at 3 a.m. Reception said he needed to come deal with one of his tour group who was demanding they call for a taxi.

When he arrived, he found a woman standing in her nightgown and holding two suitcases. She gave the same message to Sebastian, who could not reason with her, so he called the ship’s doctor.

When the doctor arrived and heard the problem, he asked the woman to turn around. He quickly pulled off two seasickness patches, one from behind each of her ears. He then told the woman that she should return to her cabin and that he would call a taxi and let her know as soon as it arrived.

The next morning, the woman had no recollection of the experience.

After this story, Sebastian encouraged anyone planning to use a motion-sickness patch to be sure to follow the instructions and use only one patch. Hallucinations are one of several side effects that can occur when using more than the suggested dosage.

ROD SMITH
Oskaloosa, KS

 

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Before we left Ushuaia, Argentina, for our expedition-ship cruise to Antarctica in December 2018, our guide Sebastian held a meeting with our group of 23. By that time, he had already made this trip many times, but he shared an experience with us that had occurred on his first trip.

The first night on the ship, his phone rang at 3 a.m. Reception said he needed to come deal with one of his tour group who was demanding they call for a taxi.

When he arrived, he found a woman standing in her nightgown and holding two suitcases. She gave the same message to Sebastian, who could not reason with her, so he called the ship’s doctor.

When the doctor arrived and heard the problem, he asked the woman to turn around. He quickly pulled off two seasickness patches, one from behind each of her ears. He then told the woman that she should return to her cabin and that he would call a taxi and let her know as soon as it arrived.

The next morning, the woman had no recollection of the experience.

After this story, Sebastian encouraged anyone planning to use a motion-sickness patch to be sure to follow the instructions and use only one patch. Hallucinations are one of several side effects that can occur when using more than the suggested dosage.

ROD SMITH
Oskaloosa, KS