Lion Air crash cause

This item appears on page 17 of the January 2019 issue.
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A preliminary report was released on Nov. 28 from the investigation of Lion Air flight 610, which crashed in the ocean on Oct. 29 while heading from Jakarta to Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board.

The report concluded that an automated anti-stall system installed by Boeing had malfunctioned, causing the system to try to point the plane's nose down, despite the pilots' repeated efforts to raise it, ultimately leading to the crash shortly after takeoff. In the report, the plane was described as "un-airworthy."

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

A preliminary report was released on Nov. 28 from the investigation of Lion Air flight 610, which crashed in the ocean on Oct. 29 while heading from Jakarta to Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board.

The report concluded that an automated anti-stall system installed by Boeing had malfunctioned, causing the system to try to point the plane's nose down, despite the pilots' repeated efforts to raise it, ultimately leading to the crash shortly after takeoff. In the report, the plane was described as "un-airworthy."