Heat waves in Europe

This item appears on page 19 of the September 2019 issue.
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Temperatures in Western Europe rose above 100°F, starting on June 26, causing health warnings to be issued in Spain, France, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Czechia. In France, some cities canceled school during the hottest days, and the cities of Paris and Lyon limited traffic to the least-polluting cars and trucks to reduce smog, which can trap heat.

A second heat wave struck Central and Western Europe on July 24, with temperatures breaking all-time highs in Paris (108.7ºF), Germany 106.7ºF), Belgium (105ºF) and the Netherlands (105.3ºF). The temperatures in the UK were so high (100.6ºF) that the national rail system required trains to move slowly so as not to buckle the overheated rails.

At press time, no deaths or major health issues had been reported in Europe due to heat.

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Temperatures in Western Europe rose above 100°F, starting on June 26, causing health warnings to be issued in Spain, France, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Czechia. In France, some cities canceled school during the hottest days, and the cities of Paris and Lyon limited traffic to the least-polluting cars and trucks to reduce smog, which can trap heat.

A second heat wave struck Central and Western Europe on July 24, with temperatures breaking all-time highs in Paris (108.7ºF), Germany 106.7ºF), Belgium (105ºF) and the Netherlands (105.3ºF). The temperatures in the UK were so high (100.6ºF) that the national rail system required trains to move slowly so as not to buckle the overheated rails.

At press time, no deaths or major health issues had been reported in Europe due to heat.