Catalonia protests

This item appears on page 20 of the December 2019 issue.
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Ongoing pro-independence protests began in the provinces of Catalonia, Spain, on Oct. 14 after Spain’s Supreme Court ordered the imprisonment of independence leaders on the charge of sedition. The size of the protests forced a number of trains and airlines to cancel some services to the area.

Protests occasionally have become violent, with clashes between police and counter-protesters reported. Fires have also been set, and on Oct. 15, protesters attempted to storm government buildings in Barcelona.

Support for independence is high in Catalonia, with about 44% of the province’s citizens in favor of it. The current regional government is ruled by an independence party that has supported the protests.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Ongoing pro-independence protests began in the provinces of Catalonia, Spain, on Oct. 14 after Spain’s Supreme Court ordered the imprisonment of independence leaders on the charge of sedition. The size of the protests forced a number of trains and airlines to cancel some services to the area.

Protests occasionally have become violent, with clashes between police and counter-protesters reported. Fires have also been set, and on Oct. 15, protesters attempted to storm government buildings in Barcelona.

Support for independence is high in Catalonia, with about 44% of the province’s citizens in favor of it. The current regional government is ruled by an independence party that has supported the protests.