Travelers’ accessories

By Brooks Goddard
This item appears on page 46 of the May 2018 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

If you would like to read an issue from the archives that is free to nonsubscribers click here.

On a recent trip to India, I used to advantage the Simran SM-60 power strip and a 4-pack of Orei 2-in-1 USA-to-India adapter plugs (Type D), priced at $11.44 on Amazon.com. The Simran strip is indispensable and allows for the use of multiple devices, one of which, for me, is a CPAP machine.

While in India, I acquired a conversion plug by MX that I later found available on Amazon India (www.amazon.in). It was priced at INR297 (near $4.60). India is trying to standardize 3-point plugs, but there are various odd configurations of the three points, so I suggest you carry different versions.

On this trip, I also used a Hoodie­Pillow® on the plane and the train. The inflatable collar keeps my head comfortably erect, while the Hoodie gives me protection from light. This is available for $29.95 from the company’s website (www.hoodiepillow.com).

Instead of wearing a backpack, I’ve taken to using a wheeled carry-on that fits under my seat. Mine has multiple zipped sections. I got it at eBags.com. eBags has many versions of this type of luggage, ranging in cost from $37.99 to $399.99.

I gave my wife an Away suitcase, The Carry-On, which she absolutely loved ($225 at www.awaytravel.com). It’s strong and easy to use. Airlines are making users each remove the device-recharging battery from their Away bags, but the luggage is still very handy.

BROOKS GODDARD

Needham, MA

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

On a recent trip to India, I used to advantage the Simran SM-60 power strip and a 4-pack of Orei 2-in-1 USA-to-India adapter plugs (Type D), priced at $11.44 on Amazon.com. The Simran strip is indispensable and allows for the use of multiple devices, one of which, for me, is a CPAP machine.

While in India, I acquired a conversion plug by MX that I later found available on Amazon India (www.amazon.in). It was priced at INR297 (near $4.60). India is trying to standardize 3-point plugs, but there are various odd configurations of the three points, so I suggest you carry different versions.

On this trip, I also used a Hoodie­Pillow® on the plane and the train. The inflatable collar keeps my head comfortably erect, while the Hoodie gives me protection from light. This is available for $29.95 from the company’s website (www.hoodiepillow.com).

Instead of wearing a backpack, I’ve taken to using a wheeled carry-on that fits under my seat. Mine has multiple zipped sections. I got it at eBags.com. eBags has many versions of this type of luggage, ranging in cost from $37.99 to $399.99.

I gave my wife an Away suitcase, The Carry-On, which she absolutely loved ($225 at www.awaytravel.com). It’s strong and easy to use. Airlines are making users each remove the device-recharging battery from their Away bags, but the luggage is still very handy.

BROOKS GODDARD

Needham, MA