Making friends through travel

By Dolores (Loie) Maminski
This item appears on page 33 of the January 2018 issue.
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Several years ago, while having lunch in Rome, my husband, Bucky Edgett, and I struck up a conversation with a Norwegian couple at the table next to us. They were from Aurskog, Norway. We exchanged contact information and kept in touch by email and Christmas cards.

In 2016, we booked a trip to Nashville, Tennessee, to see the solar eclipse in August 2017. Among the photos of participants, we saw that there was a couple from Aurskog. 

Aurskog has a population of about 13,000, so I took a long shot and asked our friends if they knew this couple. Not only did they know them, they all were friends who lived within a few blocks of each other!

We met our “new” Norwegian friends the first night, and over five days we spent a lot of time with them, explaining what “Southern hospitality” means, finding out that their farm was the site of a decisive battle in Norwegian history, learning the Norwegian phrase “Takk for i dag,” which means “Thank you for today” (used when friends part) and doing our best to demonstrate American goodwill.

Isn’t travel a marvelous thing?

DOLORES (LOIE) MAMINSKI
Westminster, MD

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Several years ago, while having lunch in Rome, my husband, Bucky Edgett, and I struck up a conversation with a Norwegian couple at the table next to us. They were from Aurskog, Norway. We exchanged contact information and kept in touch by email and Christmas cards.

In 2016, we booked a trip to Nashville, Tennessee, to see the solar eclipse in August 2017. Among the photos of participants, we saw that there was a couple from Aurskog. 

Aurskog has a population of about 13,000, so I took a long shot and asked our friends if they knew this couple. Not only did they know them, they all were friends who lived within a few blocks of each other!

We met our “new” Norwegian friends the first night, and over five days we spent a lot of time with them, explaining what “Southern hospitality” means, finding out that their farm was the site of a decisive battle in Norwegian history, learning the Norwegian phrase “Takk for i dag,” which means “Thank you for today” (used when friends part) and doing our best to demonstrate American goodwill.

Isn’t travel a marvelous thing?

DOLORES (LOIE) MAMINSKI
Westminster, MD