Kangaroo Island

By Jackie Chase
This item appears on page 47 of the December 2018 issue.
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Being the frugal person I am, I opted not to pay $145 for a tour of Kangaroo Island's wildlife park — off the coast of South Australia — to see some kangaroos in February 2017.

Fortunately, the gray-haired volunteer at the visitors' center told me that if I hiked up to Baudin Conservation Park, I might find wallabies and kangaroos sleeping under trees.

The hike was along the beach for the first half hour, then it turned into wild bush country with millions of trees. Kangaroos number in the tens of thousands there.

Wallabies sprang out of nowhere and ran faster than I could even lift my camera and shoot. My eyes searched under every tree, looking for movement or staring eyes.

Wandering into an oasis of heavy foliage, I turned to check underneath a tree when up popped this huge kangaroo. His eyes met mine for only seconds and then he was off, bouncing like a rubber ball. My camera was still hanging around my neck and in the "off" position.

After finding "my" kangaroo, I felt free to begin the long climb down to the beach to search for shells.

Life doesn't get any better than tracking kangaroos and shells all in one day!

JACKIE CHASE

Lady Lake, FL

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Being the frugal person I am, I opted not to pay $145 for a tour of Kangaroo Island's wildlife park — off the coast of South Australia — to see some kangaroos in February 2017.

Fortunately, the gray-haired volunteer at the visitors' center told me that if I hiked up to Baudin Conservation Park, I might find wallabies and kangaroos sleeping under trees.

The hike was along the beach for the first half hour, then it turned into wild bush country with millions of trees. Kangaroos number in the tens of thousands there.

Wallabies sprang out of nowhere and ran faster than I could even lift my camera and shoot. My eyes searched under every tree, looking for movement or staring eyes.

Wandering into an oasis of heavy foliage, I turned to check underneath a tree when up popped this huge kangaroo. His eyes met mine for only seconds and then he was off, bouncing like a rubber ball. My camera was still hanging around my neck and in the "off" position.

After finding "my" kangaroo, I felt free to begin the long climb down to the beach to search for shells.

Life doesn't get any better than tracking kangaroos and shells all in one day!

JACKIE CHASE

Lady Lake, FL