Great Barrier Reef recovery

This item appears on page 4 of the November 2018 issue.
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After widespread bleaching in some areas of Australia's Great Barrier Reef in 2016-2017 led to a mass die-off of corals (Dec. '16, pg. 63), a milder 2017-2018 summer, along with the success of new coral nurseries, resulted in a better-than-expected recovery. Surveys have shown that new and rejuvenated corals are showing vibrant colors in areas that had been widely bleached.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

After widespread bleaching in some areas of Australia's Great Barrier Reef in 2016-2017 led to a mass die-off of corals (Dec. '16, pg. 63), a milder 2017-2018 summer, along with the success of new coral nurseries, resulted in a better-than-expected recovery. Surveys have shown that new and rejuvenated corals are showing vibrant colors in areas that had been widely bleached.