Ethnobotanical culture outside the US

By Mary Light
This item appears on page 59 of the December 2018 issue.
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Mary Light of Ann Arbor, Michigan, has an information request. She wrote, “As a natural- and herbal-medicine practitioner and teacher, I have found that one of the most interesting and direct ways to connect with locals and their communities internationally is through their ethnobotanical culture. This could involve medicinal-plant trails, herbal botanical gardens and organic farms as well as encounters with various 'medicine men and women.'

“I would like to hear about any places outside of the US that offer these opportunities or about people who will share with visitors their knowledge of therapeutic, medicinal and nourishing botanicals, including their names, uses and cultural connections. 

“Where did you have such a visit and when (year) did it take place? Please include any available contact information or suggestions that will help in making arrangements. What did you learn about or take away from the experience or encounter? What costs were involved? What advice or thoughts can you add on this topic?”

Subscribers, email editor@intltravelnews.com or write to Ethnobotanical Explorations, c/o ITN, 2116 28th St., Sacramento, CA 95818. Include your mailing address. Photos are welcome; add captions. Responses will be printed in ITN.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Mary Light of Ann Arbor, Michigan, has an information request. She wrote, “As a natural- and herbal-medicine practitioner and teacher, I have found that one of the most interesting and direct ways to connect with locals and their communities internationally is through their ethnobotanical culture. This could involve medicinal-plant trails, herbal botanical gardens and organic farms as well as encounters with various 'medicine men and women.'

“I would like to hear about any places outside of the US that offer these opportunities or about people who will share with visitors their knowledge of therapeutic, medicinal and nourishing botanicals, including their names, uses and cultural connections. 

“Where did you have such a visit and when (year) did it take place? Please include any available contact information or suggestions that will help in making arrangements. What did you learn about or take away from the experience or encounter? What costs were involved? What advice or thoughts can you add on this topic?”

Subscribers, email editor@intltravelnews.com or write to Ethnobotanical Explorations, c/o ITN, 2116 28th St., Sacramento, CA 95818. Include your mailing address. Photos are welcome; add captions. Responses will be printed in ITN.