Egypt tomb open for visitors

This item appears on page 4 of the December 2018 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

If you would like to read an issue from the archives that is free to nonsubscribers click here.

The 4,000- year-old tomb of Mehu, located at the necropolis in Saqqara, south of Cairo, opened to the public on Sept. 17 after years of restoration work.

First discovered in 1940 and inaccessible to the public until now, the tomb has a colorful entryway that includes scenes of everyday life in ancient Egypt, depicting hunting, fishing, farming and dancing. Mehu was a high-ranking official under Pharaoh Pepi I. His son and grandson also were buried in the tomb.

The entry fee of EGP120 (near $6.70) allows access to the entire site, including the tomb of Mehu.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The 4,000- year-old tomb of Mehu, located at the necropolis in Saqqara, south of Cairo, opened to the public on Sept. 17 after years of restoration work.

First discovered in 1940 and inaccessible to the public until now, the tomb has a colorful entryway that includes scenes of everyday life in ancient Egypt, depicting hunting, fishing, farming and dancing. Mehu was a high-ranking official under Pharaoh Pepi I. His son and grandson also were buried in the tomb.

The entry fee of EGP120 (near $6.70) allows access to the entire site, including the tomb of Mehu.