‘Cashless’ in Iceland

By Warren R. Moe
This item appears on page 47 of the May 2018 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

If you would like to read an issue from the archives that is free to nonsubscribers click here.

I read that Iceland had virtually become a cashless society, with even small transactions handled via credit or debit cards. For my one-week trip in June 2017, I decided to experiment and see if I truly could operate without any local currency.

I did all of the normal things — dining out, museum admissions, city bus tickets, coffee, drinks, etc. I charged it all, no matter how small the expense. (I used a card with which no foreign-transaction fees are charged.)

At the end of the week, I had not used a single Icelandic bill or coin.

WARREN R. MOE

Danbury, WI

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I read that Iceland had virtually become a cashless society, with even small transactions handled via credit or debit cards. For my one-week trip in June 2017, I decided to experiment and see if I truly could operate without any local currency.

I did all of the normal things — dining out, museum admissions, city bus tickets, coffee, drinks, etc. I charged it all, no matter how small the expense. (I used a card with which no foreign-transaction fees are charged.)

At the end of the week, I had not used a single Icelandic bill or coin.

WARREN R. MOE

Danbury, WI