Cyprus reunification talks

This item appears on page 19 of the January 2017 issue.
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The leaders of southern and northern Cyprus met in Geneva in November to negotiate the reunification of the nation, but on Nov. 21 it was announced that they were unable to come to an agreement. 

The Eastern Mediterranean island nation has been split since a pro-Greek coup in 1974 induced Turkey to occupy the northern portion of the country, creating a southern, Greek Cyprus and a northern, Turkish Cyprus, split at the capital, Nicosia. 

The government of the southern portion is internationally recognized as the legitimate Cyprian government. Ongoing talks are expected to take as long as 18 months.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The leaders of southern and northern Cyprus met in Geneva in November to negotiate the reunification of the nation, but on Nov. 21 it was announced that they were unable to come to an agreement. 

The Eastern Mediterranean island nation has been split since a pro-Greek coup in 1974 induced Turkey to occupy the northern portion of the country, creating a southern, Greek Cyprus and a northern, Turkish Cyprus, split at the capital, Nicosia. 

The government of the southern portion is internationally recognized as the legitimate Cyprian government. Ongoing talks are expected to take as long as 18 months.