Sources of travel maps

By Robert A. Siebert
This item appears on page 48 of the November 2016 issue.
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I read with great enthusiasm the subscriber’s letter “Praise for City Maps 2 Go” (April ’16, pg. 16) about the app called City Maps 2 Go, found at www.ulmon.com.

Years ago, in order to obtain street maps and other information regarding cities in particular countries, I relied almost exclusively on those countries’ national tourist offices in New York City. However, most have closed, either for economic reasons or because of easy access to their sites on the Internet. Barnes & Noble in Manhattan has now become my source for purchasing city maps.

After I acquired a computer a few years ago, Google Maps (maps.google.com) became my primary reference for locating hotels, restaurants and major attractions. I enlarged maps as much as possible to show parts of particular cities on a large scale.

Through Google, street maps can be downloaded, showing walking directions between point A and point B as well as the travel time between them in minutes. 

Toms Port Guides (www.toms portguides.com), compiled by Tom Sheridan, provide information on dozens of worldwide destinations, including Copenhagen, where I traveled for several days in August 2016.

His guide for Copenhagen (click on “Port Guides,” then, on the right, on “Denmark - Copenhagen,” then scroll to “Denmark”), consisting of approximately 30 pages — including maps, photographs, bus routes and descriptions of a number of tourist attractions plus costs of admission as of publication — is an excellent source that travelers can download as a PDF at no cost.

ROBERT A. SIEBERT

Jamaica, NY

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I read with great enthusiasm the subscriber’s letter “Praise for City Maps 2 Go” (April ’16, pg. 16) about the app called City Maps 2 Go, found at www.ulmon.com.

Years ago, in order to obtain street maps and other information regarding cities in particular countries, I relied almost exclusively on those countries’ national tourist offices in New York City. However, most have closed, either for economic reasons or because of easy access to their sites on the Internet. Barnes & Noble in Manhattan has now become my source for purchasing city maps.

After I acquired a computer a few years ago, Google Maps (maps.google.com) became my primary reference for locating hotels, restaurants and major attractions. I enlarged maps as much as possible to show parts of particular cities on a large scale.

Through Google, street maps can be downloaded, showing walking directions between point A and point B as well as the travel time between them in minutes. 

Toms Port Guides (www.toms portguides.com), compiled by Tom Sheridan, provide information on dozens of worldwide destinations, including Copenhagen, where I traveled for several days in August 2016.

His guide for Copenhagen (click on “Port Guides,” then, on the right, on “Denmark - Copenhagen,” then scroll to “Denmark”), consisting of approximately 30 pages — including maps, photographs, bus routes and descriptions of a number of tourist attractions plus costs of admission as of publication — is an excellent source that travelers can download as a PDF at no cost.

ROBERT A. SIEBERT

Jamaica, NY