Deadly assault in Nice

This item appears on page 20 of the September 2016 issue.
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In Nice, France, on July 14, a man drove a large freight-delivery truck more than a mile on the Promenade des Anglais, zigzagging to target clusters of people gathered to celebrate Bastille Day. Eighty-four were killed, including three Americans, and 303 others were injured before the driver was shot and killed by police. The promenade had been closed to vehicular traffic for the holiday.

The militant Islamist group Daesh (ISIL) claimed the driver as “one of our soldiers,” but it is not clear whether the driver was actually a member of the group or only inspired by them. The attacker, a Franco-Tunisian, was “unknown” to police before the attack. After the attack, five suspected accomplices, including the attacker’s ex-wife, were arrested. 

A state of emergency in France, begun due to threats of terrorist attacks in the country during both the Euro soccer tournament and the Tour de France in June and July, was set to expire at the end of July. The state of emergency was extended for three months.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In Nice, France, on July 14, a man drove a large freight-delivery truck more than a mile on the Promenade des Anglais, zigzagging to target clusters of people gathered to celebrate Bastille Day. Eighty-four were killed, including three Americans, and 303 others were injured before the driver was shot and killed by police. The promenade had been closed to vehicular traffic for the holiday.

The militant Islamist group Daesh (ISIL) claimed the driver as “one of our soldiers,” but it is not clear whether the driver was actually a member of the group or only inspired by them. The attacker, a Franco-Tunisian, was “unknown” to police before the attack. After the attack, five suspected accomplices, including the attacker’s ex-wife, were arrested. 

A state of emergency in France, begun due to threats of terrorist attacks in the country during both the Euro soccer tournament and the Tour de France in June and July, was set to expire at the end of July. The state of emergency was extended for three months.