Crime, unrest in Venezuela

This item appears on page 61 of the September 2016 issue.
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The US Department of State warns that Venezuela has one of the world’s highest crime rates and that armed robberies and street crime take place throughout Caracas and other cities, including in areas generally presumed safe and frequented by tourists countrywide.

Shortages of food, water, medicine and other basic goods have led to violence and looting. Electricity is unreliable, and blackouts are frequent. In addition, political rallies and demonstrations can occur with little notice, and these were expected to occur with greater frequency in the coming months in Caracas and other regions throughout the country. 

The Venezuelan government sometimes fails to notify the US Embassy when US citizens are arrested, subsequently delaying or denying consular access to arrestees. 

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The US Department of State warns that Venezuela has one of the world’s highest crime rates and that armed robberies and street crime take place throughout Caracas and other cities, including in areas generally presumed safe and frequented by tourists countrywide.

Shortages of food, water, medicine and other basic goods have led to violence and looting. Electricity is unreliable, and blackouts are frequent. In addition, political rallies and demonstrations can occur with little notice, and these were expected to occur with greater frequency in the coming months in Caracas and other regions throughout the country. 

The Venezuelan government sometimes fails to notify the US Embassy when US citizens are arrested, subsequently delaying or denying consular access to arrestees.