Australia despite drought

By KT Porter
This item appears on page 49 of the March 2016 issue.
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If your heart is set on seeing waterfalls in Western Australia, as was the case with the Reeds during their dry-season trip (“Australia’s Kimberley Coast,” June ’15, pg. 30), you should make careful inquiries before booking a visit. Australia is experiencing drought conditions in many areas, and most of the waterfalls on the northwestern coast are often reduced to mere trickles. That’s how it was when I visited in late July-early August 2015.
During our Lindblad Expeditions (New York, NY; 800/397-3348, www.expeditions.com) cruise from Broome to Darwin, the coast was painfully dry. Regardless of the reduced water flow, I found Western Australia to be remarkably beautiful and well worth visiting.
Our ship, the National Geographic Orion, was bigger than the one the Reeds were on (337 feet long and holding up to 102 passengers versus 164 feet and 36 passengers), but in Zodiacs we were able to navigate up small rivers easily. We spent our days exploring breathtaking scenery and hiking to rock art shelters. Most of the passengers were Australians interested in seeing their country from a different point of view, and their warmth and friendliness added another dimension to make our experience special.
The National Geographic Orion currently has cruises scheduled in Europe and Antarctica, but other companies can provide the opportunity for an outstanding Australian travel experience.
KT PORTER
Slidell, LA

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If your heart is set on seeing waterfalls in Western Australia, as was the case with the Reeds during their dry-season trip (“Australia’s Kimberley Coast,” June ’15, pg. 30), you should make careful inquiries before booking a visit. Australia is experiencing drought conditions in many areas, and most of the waterfalls on the northwestern coast are often reduced to mere trickles. That’s how it was when I visited in late July-early August 2015.
During our Lindblad Expeditions (New York, NY; 800/397-3348, www.expeditions.com) cruise from Broome to Darwin, the coast was painfully dry. Regardless of the reduced water flow, I found Western Australia to be remarkably beautiful and well worth visiting.
Our ship, the National Geographic Orion, was bigger than the one the Reeds were on (337 feet long and holding up to 102 passengers versus 164 feet and 36 passengers), but in Zodiacs we were able to navigate up small rivers easily. We spent our days exploring breathtaking scenery and hiking to rock art shelters. Most of the passengers were Australians interested in seeing their country from a different point of view, and their warmth and friendliness added another dimension to make our experience special.
The National Geographic Orion currently has cruises scheduled in Europe and Antarctica, but other companies can provide the opportunity for an outstanding Australian travel experience.
KT PORTER
Slidell, LA