Cold War museum, Ontario

This item appears on page 4 of the November 2015 issue.
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Originally built in Canada in 1958 to house Prime Minister John Deifenbaker and key members of the government in case of a nuclear attack, The Diefenbunker (3929 Carp Rd., Carp, Ontario; 613/839-0007, http://diefenbunker.ca) is now a museum dedicated to preserving Canada’s role in the Cold War.

The 100,000-square-foot bunker and museum offers guided and self-guided tours through its restored rooms, including the government situation center, the Bank of Canada vault, the Prime Minister’s quarters and medical facilities. The museum also has temporary art exhibits.

Open daily 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. CAD14 (near $11) adult, CAD13 senior or CAD8 child 6-18. A free one-hour tour is available between 11 and 2 if booked in advance.

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Originally built in Canada in 1958 to house Prime Minister John Deifenbaker and key members of the government in case of a nuclear attack, The Diefenbunker (3929 Carp Rd., Carp, Ontario; 613/839-0007, http://diefenbunker.ca) is now a museum dedicated to preserving Canada’s role in the Cold War.

The 100,000-square-foot bunker and museum offers guided and self-guided tours through its restored rooms, including the government situation center, the Bank of Canada vault, the Prime Minister’s quarters and medical facilities. The museum also has temporary art exhibits.

Open daily 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. CAD14 (near $11) adult, CAD13 senior or CAD8 child 6-18. A free one-hour tour is available between 11 and 2 if booked in advance.