Passport pages tip

By Philip Wagenaar
This item appears on page 49 of the August 2015 issue.
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When I handed my passport to the Immigration officer at Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands in May 2014, I requested he put a stamp on a page that had already been used.

“The page is full,” the agent said. “I can’t put a stamp on top of a stamp.” So he turned the leaf and put a stamp smack in the middle of one of the blank pages, taking up an entire page that also could have been used for a visa or other stamps.

I decided to try to beat the travel officials at their own game. I put rubber bands around pages that I didn’t want stamped.

In the six months that followed, in numerous ports with determined Immigration officials, none of them removed or even questioned the rubber bands. My passport has enough empty sheets now to make it usable for many upcoming visas.

You might want to give it a try.

PHILIP WAGENAAR, Contributing Editor

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

When I handed my passport to the Immigration officer at Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands in May 2014, I requested he put a stamp on a page that had already been used.

“The page is full,” the agent said. “I can’t put a stamp on top of a stamp.” So he turned the leaf and put a stamp smack in the middle of one of the blank pages, taking up an entire page that also could have been used for a visa or other stamps.

I decided to try to beat the travel officials at their own game. I put rubber bands around pages that I didn’t want stamped.

In the six months that followed, in numerous ports with determined Immigration officials, none of them removed or even questioned the rubber bands. My passport has enough empty sheets now to make it usable for many upcoming visas.

You might want to give it a try.

PHILIP WAGENAAR, Contributing Editor