Idyllic Flåmsdalen, Norway

By Marilyn Santiago
This item appears on page 49 of the July 2015 issue.
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Goats in Flåm Valley, Norway. Photo by Marilyn Santiago

A couple whom we know in Sweden, Roy and Karin, invited my husband, Ray, and me to go on a road trip with them through Norway in August 2012. With much emailing, skyping and phoning, we shaped a trip that included museums, waterfalls, hiking, fjords, ferries, waterfalls, trains, ocean, churches, waterfalls and homes of artists, poets, writers and musicians.

One morning, at the top of the road coming from Oslo, we stopped to look down on the Aurlandsfjord. The town of Flåm is at the end of the innermost corner of the fjord, which is a branch of the Sognefjord.

At the end of the Sognefjord is the Flåm Camping & Youth Hostel (www.flaam-camping.no), where a 2-bedroom cabin cost $96. After checking in, we explored the area around the pier and train station, bought supplies at the little shop and went home to the hostel to make stir-fry. After dinner, we went down to the pub and sat around the fire. 

The next morning we bought train tickets for the 20-kilometer ride up to Myrdal. We planned on hiking back down at least partway, and round-trip tickets gave us the freedom to get back on at any train station along the trail.

The ride up on the train was spectacular, with mountains, rivers and waterfalls everywhere we looked. At one point, the train stopped so we could get out and enjoy the massive Kjos waterfall. 

When the train reached the top, we split up. The others took off at a fast pace, and I slowly wandered down the old construction road, stopping to look and to take photos. (The road is rocky, which sometimes makes it difficult if you want to look. You just have to stop.)

Six kilometers down was a beautiful open valley with cascading waterfalls and grassy fields full of goats freely grazing plus a small farm where you could buy goat cheese and other products. (The cheese was delicious.) This was Kårdal, the highest point in Flåmsdalen (Flåm Valley). 

The funniest sight was two goats making themselves at home on the hood of an old blue Mercedes as others snuggled up around the tires. 

A few kilometers down the road, I joined the rest of my party lunching. We continued on to Berekvam (10.5 kilometeters from Myrdal), where we hopped on the train back down to Flåm.

Once home, we took off for the Stegastein viewpoint, about 30 minutes from Flåm up route 243, for a different look at the Aurlandsfjord. We were treated to a beautiful panoramic view.

MARILYN SANTIAGO

Port Angeles, WA

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Goats in Flåm Valley, Norway. Photo by Marilyn Santiago

A couple whom we know in Sweden, Roy and Karin, invited my husband, Ray, and me to go on a road trip with them through Norway in August 2012. With much emailing, skyping and phoning, we shaped a trip that included museums, waterfalls, hiking, fjords, ferries, waterfalls, trains, ocean, churches, waterfalls and homes of artists, poets, writers and musicians.

One morning, at the top of the road coming from Oslo, we stopped to look down on the Aurlandsfjord. The town of Flåm is at the end of the innermost corner of the fjord, which is a branch of the Sognefjord.

At the end of the Sognefjord is the Flåm Camping & Youth Hostel (www.flaam-camping.no), where a 2-bedroom cabin cost $96. After checking in, we explored the area around the pier and train station, bought supplies at the little shop and went home to the hostel to make stir-fry. After dinner, we went down to the pub and sat around the fire. 

The next morning we bought train tickets for the 20-kilometer ride up to Myrdal. We planned on hiking back down at least partway, and round-trip tickets gave us the freedom to get back on at any train station along the trail.

The ride up on the train was spectacular, with mountains, rivers and waterfalls everywhere we looked. At one point, the train stopped so we could get out and enjoy the massive Kjos waterfall. 

When the train reached the top, we split up. The others took off at a fast pace, and I slowly wandered down the old construction road, stopping to look and to take photos. (The road is rocky, which sometimes makes it difficult if you want to look. You just have to stop.)

Six kilometers down was a beautiful open valley with cascading waterfalls and grassy fields full of goats freely grazing plus a small farm where you could buy goat cheese and other products. (The cheese was delicious.) This was Kårdal, the highest point in Flåmsdalen (Flåm Valley). 

The funniest sight was two goats making themselves at home on the hood of an old blue Mercedes as others snuggled up around the tires. 

A few kilometers down the road, I joined the rest of my party lunching. We continued on to Berekvam (10.5 kilometeters from Myrdal), where we hopped on the train back down to Flåm.

Once home, we took off for the Stegastein viewpoint, about 30 minutes from Flåm up route 243, for a different look at the Aurlandsfjord. We were treated to a beautiful panoramic view.

MARILYN SANTIAGO

Port Angeles, WA