Protesting Charlie Hebdo

This item appears on page 16 of the March 2015 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

If you would like to read an issue from the archives that is free to nonsubscribers click here.

In spite of the Jan. 7 terrorist attack on the Charlie Hebdo magazine offices in Paris, the staff decided to release the next issue with a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad crying and holding a sign reading “Je Suis Charlie” (“I am Charlie”), a slogan that quickly spread after the attack.

In response to the Jan. 14 magazine cover, protests against the depiction of Muhammad occurred across the Muslim world, occasionally escalating into violence.

Violent protests in Niger led to the burning of Christian buildings, including churches and orphanages, on Jan 19. At least 10 people were killed and 170 injured in attacks throughout the country. Major protests against the cover were also staged in Karachi, Pakistan; Khartoum, Sudan, and Algiers, Algeria.

 

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In spite of the Jan. 7 terrorist attack on the Charlie Hebdo magazine offices in Paris, the staff decided to release the next issue with a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad crying and holding a sign reading “Je Suis Charlie” (“I am Charlie”), a slogan that quickly spread after the attack.

In response to the Jan. 14 magazine cover, protests against the depiction of Muhammad occurred across the Muslim world, occasionally escalating into violence.

Violent protests in Niger led to the burning of Christian buildings, including churches and orphanages, on Jan 19. At least 10 people were killed and 170 injured in attacks throughout the country. Major protests against the cover were also staged in Karachi, Pakistan; Khartoum, Sudan, and Algiers, Algeria.