Multiple-entry China visa

By David Williams
This item appears on page 45 of the March 2015 issue.
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In January I picked up my new 10-year China visa, which has unlimited-entry privileges. It is my understanding that all 10-year visas allow multiple entries into China*.

Incidentally, my new visa was procured through Lisa O’Brian at Universal Passports & Visas (Dallas, TX; 800/831-2098, www.universalpassportsandvisas.com)

I have used them before, for a visa for India, and got very efficient and fast service. The cost of my China visa included a fee of $140 plus $50 to Universal for a total of $190. 

DAVID WILLIAMS

Dallas, TX

*Mr. Williams is correct. The Travel Brief “China visa extended” (Feb. ’15, pg. 4) might have caused some confusion about this issue. It should have read as follows: “A deal struck between the US and Chinese governments on Nov. 12 extends from one year to 10 years the maximum validity period of multiple-entry tourist and business visas for US citizens traveling to China. The application process and the visa fee of $140 remain the same. Any traveler continuing to Hong Kong or Macau must use a multiple-entry visa in order to reenter China.”

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In January I picked up my new 10-year China visa, which has unlimited-entry privileges. It is my understanding that all 10-year visas allow multiple entries into China*.

Incidentally, my new visa was procured through Lisa O’Brian at Universal Passports & Visas (Dallas, TX; 800/831-2098, www.universalpassportsandvisas.com)

I have used them before, for a visa for India, and got very efficient and fast service. The cost of my China visa included a fee of $140 plus $50 to Universal for a total of $190. 

DAVID WILLIAMS

Dallas, TX

*Mr. Williams is correct. The Travel Brief “China visa extended” (Feb. ’15, pg. 4) might have caused some confusion about this issue. It should have read as follows: “A deal struck between the US and Chinese governments on Nov. 12 extends from one year to 10 years the maximum validity period of multiple-entry tourist and business visas for US citizens traveling to China. The application process and the visa fee of $140 remain the same. Any traveler continuing to Hong Kong or Macau must use a multiple-entry visa in order to reenter China.”