A most captivating museum

By Michael J.E. Burge
This item appears on page 46 of the March 2015 issue.
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Tell us about the funniest thing that happened to you while traveling in a foreign country. (ITN prints no info on destinations in the United States.) There are no restrictions on length. ITN staff will choose each month’s winner, who will receive a free one-year subscription to ITN. Include your full mailing address. Entries not chosen cannot be acknowledged. 

This month’s winner is MICHAEL J.E. BURGE of Ventura, California:

 

While in Singapore a few years ago, I decided to go to the Changi Museum, where they had built a replica of the 1940s prison where Britons, Americans, New Zealanders and Australians all had been held during the Japanese occupation.

I boarded a public bus and asked the driver to let me know when to get off. When he called out “Changi,” I alighted and walked down a narrow road to the administration office. I signed the visitors’ book, and my day pack was examined, as is quite common at museums.

Then the officer wanted to fingerprint me and search my person. I commented that this was a lot of work just to visit a museum.

He replied, “Museum! You are in the Changi main jail. The museum is one more bus stop down the road.”

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Tell us about the funniest thing that happened to you while traveling in a foreign country. (ITN prints no info on destinations in the United States.) There are no restrictions on length. ITN staff will choose each month’s winner, who will receive a free one-year subscription to ITN. Include your full mailing address. Entries not chosen cannot be acknowledged. 

This month’s winner is MICHAEL J.E. BURGE of Ventura, California:

 

While in Singapore a few years ago, I decided to go to the Changi Museum, where they had built a replica of the 1940s prison where Britons, Americans, New Zealanders and Australians all had been held during the Japanese occupation.

I boarded a public bus and asked the driver to let me know when to get off. When he called out “Changi,” I alighted and walked down a narrow road to the administration office. I signed the visitors’ book, and my day pack was examined, as is quite common at museums.

Then the officer wanted to fingerprint me and search my person. I commented that this was a lot of work just to visit a museum.

He replied, “Museum! You are in the Changi main jail. The museum is one more bus stop down the road.”