Accessible transport in London

By Kathy Wilhelm
This item appears on page 45 of the March 2015 issue.
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I was very impressed by Kathryn Tisdale’s description of her Europe trip and her tips for the mobility impaired (Jan. ’15, pg. 18). However, I do have a couple of related suggestions for London, which I last visited in December 2014.

I avoid the hop-on, hop-off buses. They’re expensive, they have no shelter on the top deck and, from reports I’ve read, it sounds like you can sometimes wait a long time.

Instead, I recommend using the buses of Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk/transport-accessibility/). The city has made a lot of improvements in bus transport since I lived there in the late ’60s. They say all bus routes are now handicapped accessible. It has become much, much easier to navigate the bus system.

There are good maps and a travel planner on the website. And useful route information can be found at bus stops, many of which have electronic boards with information on the next few arrivals.

People using public transport would be able to use a London Travelcard (NOT a London Pass). Buying the Travelcard as a paper pass from an aboveground National Rail station (not at an underground station) gives you access to a number of two-for-one deals (www.daysoutguide.co.uk), besides the access to all modes of transport.

Since I travel solo, I don’t use the two-for-one deals, but Ms. Tisdale could have done so, since she was traveling with her husband.

KATHY WILHELM

Cary, NC

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I was very impressed by Kathryn Tisdale’s description of her Europe trip and her tips for the mobility impaired (Jan. ’15, pg. 18). However, I do have a couple of related suggestions for London, which I last visited in December 2014.

I avoid the hop-on, hop-off buses. They’re expensive, they have no shelter on the top deck and, from reports I’ve read, it sounds like you can sometimes wait a long time.

Instead, I recommend using the buses of Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk/transport-accessibility/). The city has made a lot of improvements in bus transport since I lived there in the late ’60s. They say all bus routes are now handicapped accessible. It has become much, much easier to navigate the bus system.

There are good maps and a travel planner on the website. And useful route information can be found at bus stops, many of which have electronic boards with information on the next few arrivals.

People using public transport would be able to use a London Travelcard (NOT a London Pass). Buying the Travelcard as a paper pass from an aboveground National Rail station (not at an underground station) gives you access to a number of two-for-one deals (www.daysoutguide.co.uk), besides the access to all modes of transport.

Since I travel solo, I don’t use the two-for-one deals, but Ms. Tisdale could have done so, since she was traveling with her husband.

KATHY WILHELM

Cary, NC