Barcelona’s Poble Espanyol

By Victor Block
This item appears on page 52 of the December 2014 issue.
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Visitors to Barcelona who confine their sightseeing to the Gaudí architecture, Las Ramblas pedestrian mall, the Gothic Quarter and the inviting beach miss one of the city’s most enticing attractions.

El Poble Espanyol, or The Spanish Village, (Avda. Francesc Ferrer i Guardia, 13, 08038 Barcelona, Spain; phone +34 93 508 63 00, www.poble-espanyol.com/en), is an open-air museum that combines an introduction to that country’s architectural treasures and various cultures with an enjoyable shopping and dining experience.

During a visit to Barcelona, July 14-18, 2014, my wife, Fyllis, and I spent a very pleasant day wandering through the streets and squares of El Poble Espanyol checking out boutiques and craft workshops and enjoying the sounds of flamenco and other traditional Spanish music.

We bought our tickets at the entrance to the village, but you may also buy them in advance online (www.poble-espanyol.com/en/tickets-and-passes). Tickets cost 12 (near $15) for adults, 8.4 for seniors 65 and older and 7 ($9) for children ages 4-12.

The Spanish Village was built for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition and was supposed to be demolished after the 6-month exhibition ended. It proved to be so popular, however, that it was retained as a permanent attraction in the heart of the city.

Strolling along the winding streets and through squares occupied by outdoor cafés, visitors are immersed in the atmosphere of a Spanish town, one that brings together 117 outstanding architectural treasures from throughout the country.

While every reproduction in the 109-acre site is magnificent in its own right, Fyllis and I had a few favorites.

The entrance gate into El Poble Espanyol is an exact copy of one of nine gates in the wall surrounding Avila, a town dating back to the 11th century.

El Mirador Sigüenza, which replicates a 15th-century house in the La Mancha region, is adorned by the balconies from which people watched bullfights.

Calle Cuna is characteristic of the whitewashed houses set off by arches that abound in Andalucía.

In addition to its role as an outdoor museum, The Spanish Village introduces visitors to typical crafts from around Spain. Artisans in nearly two dozen workshops make and sell pottery, textiles, baskets, jewelry and other wares.

Adding to the realistic setting are more than 20 restaurants and cafés that offer fare ranging from traditional tapas dishes to several-course meals. In the evening, flamenco shows, concerts and other entertainment invite visitors to linger longer.

 

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Visitors to Barcelona who confine their sightseeing to the Gaudí architecture, Las Ramblas pedestrian mall, the Gothic Quarter and the inviting beach miss one of the city’s most enticing attractions.

El Poble Espanyol, or The Spanish Village, (Avda. Francesc Ferrer i Guardia, 13, 08038 Barcelona, Spain; phone +34 93 508 63 00, www.poble-espanyol.com/en), is an open-air museum that combines an introduction to that country’s architectural treasures and various cultures with an enjoyable shopping and dining experience.

During a visit to Barcelona, July 14-18, 2014, my wife, Fyllis, and I spent a very pleasant day wandering through the streets and squares of El Poble Espanyol checking out boutiques and craft workshops and enjoying the sounds of flamenco and other traditional Spanish music.

We bought our tickets at the entrance to the village, but you may also buy them in advance online (www.poble-espanyol.com/en/tickets-and-passes). Tickets cost 12 (near $15) for adults, 8.4 for seniors 65 and older and 7 ($9) for children ages 4-12.

The Spanish Village was built for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition and was supposed to be demolished after the 6-month exhibition ended. It proved to be so popular, however, that it was retained as a permanent attraction in the heart of the city.

Strolling along the winding streets and through squares occupied by outdoor cafés, visitors are immersed in the atmosphere of a Spanish town, one that brings together 117 outstanding architectural treasures from throughout the country.

While every reproduction in the 109-acre site is magnificent in its own right, Fyllis and I had a few favorites.

The entrance gate into El Poble Espanyol is an exact copy of one of nine gates in the wall surrounding Avila, a town dating back to the 11th century.

El Mirador Sigüenza, which replicates a 15th-century house in the La Mancha region, is adorned by the balconies from which people watched bullfights.

Calle Cuna is characteristic of the whitewashed houses set off by arches that abound in Andalucía.

In addition to its role as an outdoor museum, The Spanish Village introduces visitors to typical crafts from around Spain. Artisans in nearly two dozen workshops make and sell pottery, textiles, baskets, jewelry and other wares.

Adding to the realistic setting are more than 20 restaurants and cafés that offer fare ranging from traditional tapas dishes to several-course meals. In the evening, flamenco shows, concerts and other entertainment invite visitors to linger longer.